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Country Gardens arr. improver level piano solo (Melody in played by Left Hand)

This is another improver level arrangement for piano or keyboard with the melody being played by the left hand whilst the right plays an accompaniment. The intention of the arrangement is to encourage balanced in the hands with the right hand playing quietly and the left hand playing out the melody so that it is clearly heard. It is an ideal piece of music for the improver level keyboards player as the melody is both familiar and quickly internalised. Do pay attention to the rhythmic detail and particularly the dotted notes. The realisation plays back at 66 half note or minim beats to the minute. There is suggested fingering in place on the sheet music score and keyboard players should be aiming for rhythmic playing with a legato touch. The time signature is 2/2 often referred to as “cut time” meaning that there are two half note or minim beats to the bar. Country Gardens is a traditional English folk tune that was collected (notated) by Cecil Sharp in 1899 from the concertina playing of William Kimber who was the musician for Headington Quarry Morris Men. The chords are also notated above the treble clef stave using letter symbols simply to get players used to understanding how these these symbols are used particularly in the playing of folk and popular music.

Added: 2020-07-09 12:36:43

Second Movement: Andante from Sonatina in C Opus 20 No.1

The second movement Andante from Kuhlau’s Sonatina in C is an intermediate level piano solo and an excellent piece to play for those seeking to develop their legato playing in the context of a slow movement. Playing a slow movement does require emotional range and they are often more difficult to play than musicians imagine when compared to say a minuet and trio and a moderate tempo. This slow movement needs to be played with a clear awareness of the 6/8 timing which needs to be communicated in the playing. The rhythmic detail requires particular attention whilst the melody clearly needs to sing out over the accompaniment. The repeats are played in the realisation. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended and has been notated in just the first line of the sheet music score although its use is required for the whole movement. The convention when playing a repeated note in classical music is often to change the finger used and keyboard players may wish to develop this technique in this movement. A plain score is appended to the edited sheet music score enabling players to edit in their own choice of fingering and pedal markings.

Added: 2020-07-08 11:44:19

Country Gardens arranged for improver level piano

Country Gardens is a traditional English folk tune that was collected (notated) by Cecil Sharp in 1899 from the concertina playing of William Kimber who was the musician for Headington Quarry Morris Men. There are many variants of the tune and this is an improver level two part arrangement for piano or keyboard. It is an ideal piece of music for the improver level keyboards player as the melody is both familiar and quickly internalised. Do pay attention to the rhythmic detail and particularly the dotted notes. The realisation plays back at 72 half note or minim beats to the minute. There is suggested fingering in place on the sheet music score and keyboard players should be aiming for rhythmic playing with a legato touch. The time signature is 2/2 often referred to as “cut time” meaning that there are two half note or minim beats to the bar.

Added: 2020-07-08 10:20:17

Après un rêve arr. organ

The piece has its origins as a song composed in the key of the key of C minor published in 1878 and is one of the composers most beautiful and popular melodies. In this arrangement a tempo of 58 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute has been used in the realisation. Two registrations are suggested for the playing of the melody which is best played on a swell or choir manual. Fauré as a pianist and accompanist was very much regarded as something of a metronome and not considered to be very sympathetic to singers of his songs particularly when they added subtlety and nuance at the end of phrases. It would be beneficial to spend time reading through the text for the song in translation to have an understanding of the music’s original context. As an organ piece this music is suited to being played on different occasions.

Added: 2020-07-08 10:12:02

Frankie and Johnnie arr. improver level piano

Frankie and Johnnie is an improver level piano solo exploring the 12 bar blues in a swing style requiring it to be played with a triplet feel. The convention as far as notating swing rhythm can vary and be confusing. Listen to the realisation score and understand the conventions involved in the notation of the rhythmic shapes. The original text of the song is about jealousy and murder and likely to be in part true. There are hundreds of recordings of the song representing a great range of musical styles. The realisation plays back at 120 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute although the closing section is played at a slightly slower tempo. The music needs to be played in a relaxed manner and there is opportunity to explore the articulation of the melody notes. The best advice when playing this type of music is to essentially make a performance your own.

Added: 2020-06-30 13:50:50

Arrival of the Queen of Sheba arr. piano and organ

The “Arrival of the Queen of Sheba” is a very popular piece and is often used as a wedding processional. This shortened version has just 36 bars and lasts for just over a minute which is often long enough for the purposes of most weddings. The sounding key of the organ arrangement is G major whilst the realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Three registrations are suggested and used in the realisation and are suggested for a performance. There is also a piano score attached to the organ score as the music can be quite satisfactorily played on the manuals. Playing the full version is quite a challenge because of the key changes which make closing off the music in the context of a wedding rather unpredictable and often not easy. The sinfonia was originally scored for two oboes and strings and comes from Act III of Handel’s oratorio “Solomon.” The title the was given to the Sinfonia by Sir Thomas Beecham possibly in the 1930’s.

Added: 2020-06-30 10:11:12

II. Largo from Organ Sonata in D minor

The Largo from the Organ Sonata in D minor is a binary form movement in 12/8. The realisation plays back at 42 dotted quarter note beats to the minute whilst the trills sound on the playing of the repeats. The sheet music comes with both a piano and organ score. This is a very good movement to transition piano players into playing the organ with two manuals and pedals. The music editor suggests playing through the music without ornamentation in the first instance then adding the trills on the repeat. The advice on the use or ornaments is that appropriateness and consistency should be the abiding criteria in a performance. Ornamentation is a complex issue particularly at this time in music history. Apart from the consideration of Italian style there is also the fact that Galuppi is one of those composers who links one musical age and with another in what was a time of much change in performance practice. He composed a great number of works for keyboard instruments and was highly regarded as a performer. He also composed operas and sacred music. Galuppi’s music is not particularly well represented by publishers and one of the reasons for this is because of Napoleon’s invasion of Venice in 1797. As a consequence of this many of the composer’s manuscripts were lost. Baldassare Galuppi (1706 – 1785) was born on the Venetian island of Burano and whilst he worked in Vienna, London and St. Petersburg he was mostly based in Venice where he held a number of important musical positions. He is one of an important group of composers that link the baroque with the classical age and is identified particularly with the style galant movement.

Added: 2020-06-25 09:16:44

I. Allegro from Organ Sonata in D minor

The First Movement from Baldassare Galuppi’s Organ Sonata in D minor is in AB binary form. For those who wish to have more information on how the ornaments are played then the music editor suggests referring to the video sheet music score on YouTube where the ornaments are written out in full. As an organ piece the movement can be effectively played on a one manual instrument with possibly a choice of 8’ stops. This is music composed in the transition period between the baroque and classical periods. The A section is just 10 bars long and essentially comprises has two contrasting musical ideas or strains a and b with each strain being 5 bars long. The section closes in the dominant key of A minor. The B section is 20 bars long and opens with the same shape and strain as the first section but in A minor. Some new material is introduced at bar 16 and then after a few passing modulations the movement returns to the home key and opening strain of Section A at bar 23. Baldassare Galuppi (1706 – 1785) was born on the Venetian island of Burano and whilst he worked in Vienna, London and St. Petersburg he was mostly based in Venice where he held a number of important musical positions. He is one of an important group of composers that link the baroque with the classical age and is identified particularly with the style galant movement.

Added: 2020-06-25 08:58:48

III. Allegro e spiritoso from Organ Sonata in D minor

The uplifting third movement from Baldassare Galuppi's Organ Sonata in D minor has strong rhythmic shapes and harmonic sequences. The video score plays back at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. A lightness in the registration is appropriate whilst the movement can be played the without repeats. There is a lovely exploration of space in this music with the rhythmic shapes being a strong feature of the musical content. Galuppi is one of an important group of composers that link the baroque with the classical age and is identified particularly with the “galant style” movement. Galuppi’s music is not particularly well represented by publishers and one of the reasons for this is because of Napoleon’s invasion of Venice in 1797. As a consequence of this many of the composers’ manuscripts misplaced and lost.

Added: 2020-06-25 08:30:11

Adagio from Sonata in A minor Wq 70/4, H 85

Carl Philip Emanuel Bach 1714 - 1788 is an important figure in music history and a composer that links the baroque with the classical era. He was an important influence on F.J.Haydn and L. van Beethoven who both held J. S. Bach’s composing son in high regard. This particular period in music history is a fascinating one and C.P.E Bach’s music is deserving of more attention both from the performance point of view and the need for well researched modern editions of his most popular music. This particular movement is in the “empfindsamer Stil” or sensitive style that is a feature in much of C.P.E.Bach’s music and other north German composers of the mid 18th century. It is approach that focuses on the expression of emotion in an intimate musical style that could be described as being declamatory or one that utilises both drama and dialogue. Whilst a movement with appeal there will be quite a challenge getting the piece to a performance standard. A realisation score with the ornaments all written out is appended to the sheet music score so that keyboard players can make a thorough study of the ornamentation of this work. This is an often complex and contradictory area but understandable because this composition comes from a time of great change in music. Keyboard players should have a sense of an eighth note quaver beat whilst the video score plays back at a tempo of 58 quaver beats to the minute. C.P.E. Bach’s favourite keyboard instrument was the in fact the clavichord and he was not really known to be an organ virtuoso like his father. He composed relatively little for the organ but did write some sonatas music for the sister of Frederick II, the Great, Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia. This movement which is part of a three movement sonata was composed sometime around 1755. C.P.E. Bach was known as the “Berlin Bach” whilst he worked in Berlin and then the “Hamburg Bach” when he moved there to replace his godfather Telemann as Kapellmeister. This distinguished him from his brother J.C. Bach who was known as the “London Bach”.

Added: 2020-06-24 20:57:13

Lascia chio pianga

The aria or song is taken from the opera Rinaldo which first appeared in 1711 and was revised in 1733. It is in ABA form and based on the sarabande rhythm which has the stress on the second beat of the three beats in the bar. When sung the Da Capo section would be an opportunity for the soloist to improvise and ornament the melody and this is option available to the organists although it is important to keep to the style and mood of the piece. This is very appropriate music for a solemn processional in an organ playing context. The use of three registrations is suggested and are indicated in the score. Rests have been indicated in all parts so that players have a clear understanding of the voicing. It is also a movement that invites interpretation and playing in different contexts. The arrangement is in the original key of F major although the tempo for the organ solo is more Larghetto than Largo which was the tempo indication in the opera. The video score plays back at a tempo of 66 half note or minim beats to the minute. Rests are indicated in the score enabling players to have a clear understanding of the voicing of the musical lines. Moskowski has also arranged the aria for piano.

Added: 2020-06-24 17:20:30

It Was A Lovely Holiday Improver Piano

It is intended to introduce keyboard players to “swing” playing. This slow blues has a simple two part texture. Whilst swing music has a triplet feel to it players need to appreciate that the conventions involved in the notation of the rhythm of swing style can vary and be confusing. Listen to the playback score and understand the conventions involved in the writing of swing music by studying the score notated in common time and the appended score in 12/8. Appreciate that swing music can be notated in more than one way. The notation convention in the edited music score with suggested fingering is how this music would normally be presented to the music reading musician. The form of the 32 piece can be represented by the letters A A B A with each section being 8 bars long. Keyboard players should be aiming for fluidity in their playing. The realisation plays back at 110 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. As a warm up to playing the piece the music editor suggests playing through through the following blues upwards and downwards slowly simply to become familiar with the sound of each scale. Eb major Eb F G Ab Bb C D Eb Eb blues Eb Gb Ab Bbb Bb Db Eb Eb minor Eb F Gb Ab Bb Cb D natural Eb Instrument players interested in this style of music will need to become familiar with terms like blue note and blues turnaround and spend time listening to blues style piano players particular from the New Orleans area.

Added: 2020-06-24 13:08:32

Für Elise for solo piano

A very familiar piano piece known as “Für Elise” and sometimes described as Bagatelle in A minor WoO 59 although it is actually in rondo form. Interestingly it is a piece that was not published until 40 years after the composer’s death. As a popular piece with some sections invitingly straightforward and others more challenging to play it is a movement that is frequently played badly. Counting and communicating the beats to the bar particularly in the tricky octave sections is essential if the timing is to be accurate. The realisation is lacking in tonal contrast. The movement needs to be played with a lightness in the hands which means that it shouldn’t be played too loudly. The performer needs to aim to communicate the simplicity of the music which actually is quite a rare quality in Beethoven’s music. The realisation is a little bit stiff and lacks fluidity especially in the statement and of the opening motif/shape and its many repetitions. The player has the opportunity to linger a little more than is demonstrated in the playback whilst always suggesting a one beat to the bar feel in the music. The music editor suggests the use the sustaining pedal and its use is indicated in the first section of the sheet music score. The bass line from bar 81 is an opportunity for pianists to use different fingers on the repeating notes and the music editor suggests the players write in their own fingering choices. For those wanting clarity on how to play the turn in bar 51 the music editor suggests looking at the video score on our YouTube channel. Click the link on the home page of the website. The music editor has not made use of repeat signs which is an option that could have been used in the first part of the movement Beethoven expanded the musical forms of the classical period. He also is an important link between the classical and the subsequent romantic age. As a composer he was especially interested in process and the exploration of musical ideas. Für Elise is also a romantic work in the sense that it invites a strong emotional response from both players and listeners.

Added: 2020-06-18 12:10:37

Rondo from Sonatina in C Opus 20 No. 1

The third movement from Kuhlau’s Sonatina in C is an intermediate level piano solo and an excellent piece to play for those seeking to acquire the piano technique needed to play classical music competently. This is a typical last movement of a sonatina or sonata in that it is light in mood and in rondo form. A rondo is a movement with a recurring theme and the structure can be represented by the letters ABACAB + a closing section or coda. For those who persevere in managing to play the movement competently there are many pieces waiting to be played from the classical repertoire. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Playing at this tempo does require lightness in the hands. This is perfect music for the piano with both themes and accompaniment perfectly suited to being articulated on the piano. The sustain pedal is may be used but its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. Friedrich Kuhlau (1786 – 1832) was a Danish composer and pianist of the late Classical and early Romantic time who along with a group of composers that includes Muzio Clementi (1752 -1832), Jan L. Dussek (1760 – 1812) and others composed piano music that is has become essential repertoire for the growing pianist.

Added: 2020-06-13 12:20:46

Duet 3 BWV 804 (organ)

Duet No.3 BWV 804 in G major is an appealing work with a light, dance like character. It is an intermediate level performance piece reminiscent of the composers Two Part Inventions. The Duet does present a number of score reading challenges for the player even though the music is conceived in two parts. The 4 Duets are part of Clavier-Übung III or the German Organ Mass and composed really at the zenith of the composer’s contrapuntal writing. The edited music score has suggested fingering which may serve as a useful guide to how the movement is studied in the first instance. The music editors concept is that once familiarised with the movement that players will make use of the plain score perhaps substituting their own choice of fingering where they feel it is appropriate. The time signature is in 12/8 and the piano realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many fine performances of this movement on several different types of keyboard instrument that are worth exploring.

Added: 2020-06-13 12:10:53

Duet No.3 BWV 804 (piano)

Duet No.3 BWV 804 in G major is an appealing work with a light, dance like character. It is an intermediate level performance piece reminiscent of the composers Two Part Inventions. The Duet does present a number of score reading challenges for the player even though the music is conceived in two parts. The 4 Duets are part of Clavier-Übung III or the German Organ Mass and composed really at the zenith of the composer’s contrapuntal writing. The edited music score has suggested fingering which may serve as a useful guide to how the movement is studied in the first instance. The music editors concept is that once familiarised with the movement that players will make use of the plain score perhaps substituting their own choice of fingering where they feel it is appropriate. The time signature is in 12/8 and the piano realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many fine performances of this movement on several different types of keyboard instrument that are worth exploring.

Added: 2020-06-13 11:59:40

It’s A Date

It's A Date is a beginner level piano/keyboard piece based on a 12 bar blues. As a beginner score the letter names of the notes appear in the note heads and suggested fingering is in place. The tempo of the playback on the video score is 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.Players need to take notice of the accent signs marked in the score and keep their hands as light as possible. Playing a blues structured piece of music does encourage fluent playing and the development of musical memory. The 12 bar blues forms the basis of much popular music of the 20th century.

Added: 2020-06-08 13:25:05

The One Ten Blues Piano Solo

The One Ten Blues is an improver level piano solo exploring the blues idiom at a medium tempo Formally it can be represented by the letters A B A with A having a standard 12 bar blues structure and B being a middle 8 bar section. A percussive approach to playing the keyboard is appropriate for this piece and the rhythm needs to be played in a straight manner. The realisation plays back at 110 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. As a warm up to playing the piece the music editor suggests playing through through the following three blues scales upwards and downwards slowly simply to become familiar with the sound of the scale. C Eb F Gb G Bb C F Ab Bb B (natural) C Eb F G Bb C Db D F G For those wishing to connect blues music with rock and roll and rhythm and blues spend time listening to recordings by Louis Prima, Big Joe Turner, Louis Jordan, Fats Domino and others.

Added: 2020-06-08 11:03:46

The Wild Horseman from Album for the Young Opus 68

The Wild Horseman is an improver level piano solo and an ideal piece to encourage fast playing. In ternary form ABA the music comes from the collection that Schumann composed in 1848 for his three daughters. It is in A minor and is an excellent piece for developing arpeggio playing. It should be played at a fast tempo whilst the realization plays back at 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. The Album for the Young is one of the great collections of piano literature for the young player.

Added: 2020-06-01 10:28:12

Canzona No.5

Froberger’s Canzona No.5 is a work performed on both the organ and harpsichord. It is composed in three section ABC each being independent of the other. The music is conceived in 4 lines and imitation is a featured compositional process. The realization plays back at 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the A section, 76 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the B section and 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the final C section. When playing through the movement some thought does need to be given to the sharing of the lines between the two hands. There are moments in the score when there is tonal/modal ambiguity in the score. False relation is in evidence in the writing. This movement is evidence that the tonal system was not fully established and in place. The thematic ideas in all three sections are of a lively and uplifting character. The tempo is much slower at the cadence points at the end of the three section. Cadence points also offer an opportunity for ornamentation that needs to be appropriate style. The music is conceived in 4 parts and where a part is not being sounded rests also indicated in the score. When played on a two manual organ the A+C section can be played on one manual and the B section on another. 8 ft stops would be an appropriate choice for the registration. Johann Jacob Froberger (1616 – 1667) was a German baroque composer, harpsichordist and organist particularly remembered for creating and developing the keyboard suite. The composer generally would not allow his music to be published so only his patrons and friends were familiar with his music. As recently as 2006 an autographed manuscript of his music was discovered. He was a pupil of Frescobaldi and spent time living and working in Vienna.

Added: 2020-05-31 12:11:44

Second Movement Vivace from Piano Sonatina in C major Opus 55 No.1

This is a short concentrated movement having a lightness of mood often associated with final movements of musical works in the classical period. The melodic material is both appealing and chromatic scale passages can be described as transition preparing the way for a return to the opening theme. The final 12 bars can be described as a coda or closing section. The realization plays back at a tempo of 80 dotted quarter notes beats (dotted crotchet) to the minute. A lightness in the hands is essential to play this music at tempo. As an adult player revisiting a student piece it becomes much clearer what two techniques need to be practiced in order to become a competent keyboard player. Firstly, thumb under technique and fourth finger over technique (encouraged by practice of scales). Secondly, changing the finger on a repeating note encourages a lightness in the hands when playing music at this tempo. There is an edited sheet music score available which has suggested fingering available as a free score from the PlentyMusic website. A plain sheet music score is also appended. This particular movement is also excellent for exploring the full range of the piano. Friedrich Kuhlau (1786 – 1832) was a Danish composer and pianist of the late Classical and early Romantic time who along with a group of composers that includes Muzio Clementi (1752 -1832), Jan L. Dussek (1760 – 1812) and others produced piano music that is has become valued repertoire for the developing pianist and much of it has been used for teaching purposes.

Added: 2020-05-31 10:58:09

Piano Sonatina in C Opus 20 No.1 First Movement

A quite charming and beautiful movement perfect for developing and combining legato playing with a sound piano playing technique. The repeat is not played in the realization. The music editor has been quite minimalist as far as score detail is concerned simply because too many edited copies of this sonatina have score detail that is irrelevant when playing on a modern piano or keyboard. There is an edited sheet music score available which has suggested fingering on the website. This also has a plain sheet music score attached. The principle of contrast so essential to the classical composition is evident in this movement. Friedrich Kuhlau (1786 – 1832) was a Danish composer and pianist of the late Classical and early Romantic time who along with a group of composers that includes Muzio Clementi (1752 -1832), Jan L. Dussek (1760 – 1812) and others produced piano music that is has become essential repertoire for the developing pianist.

Added: 2020-05-21 16:03:42

Fauré G. Le jardin de Dolly (from the Dolly Suite Opus 56) arr. piano duet (piano 4 hands)

Le jardin de Dolly is the third movement of the Dolly Suite Opus 56 and was originally published as a piano duet. The realization score plays back at a tempo of 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. When performing the music there is an opportunity to slow down at the ends of phrases and then return to a tempo at the start of the next phrase and this approach is featured in both the realisation and the accompaniments. Gabriel Fauré’s Le jardin de Dolly is a lovely piano duet to play. Once you notice the detail of the scoring then you begin to appreciate the beauty of the writing and scoring. Use of the sustaining pedal to communicate the range of the harmonic colour is recommended and but not indicated in the sheet music score. The movement technically is not difficult to play but it does require careful reading and understanding of the contexts of the parts particularly when the melody moves to one of the inner parts. Too many duettists play this music too quickly which makes it rather abrupt as such and some of the reflective quality is lost. There are many recordings from both recent times and the recording archive which are worth exploring. The music editor was particularly impressed with the recording by Beatrice and Walter Klein who play the movement in an almost hushed secretive manner. The modal element that features in so much of Fauré’s music stems back to the fact that the composer like many French musicians was trained in the traditions of church music which referenced the old scales used particularly in the singing of plainchant. The two piano parts Primo and Secondo can be downloaded separately as “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo part The Primo part sounds on the right channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the left channel. Accompaniment 1 plays at 69 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 76 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a 4 bar click beat before the music starts playing to give a clear pulse to players. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players

Added: 2020-05-12 13:30:02

Minuet in G WoO 10 No.2 arr. clarinet in A & piano

A very appealing and familiar movement from the treasure trove of Beethoven’s works WoO (Without Opus number) Originally composed for orchestra, the manuscript was lost and the music has essentially been reconstructed from a piano arrangement. It is a melodic piece full of character and humour and this arrangement is for clarinet in A with piano accompaniment. In performance the Minuet is played with repeats followed by the Trio section marked Più mosso again with repeats. Finally, the first Minuet is repeated but this time without repeats. A rit. (slowing down) at the end of the two main sections (minuet and trio) is appropriate. The music editor urges those auditioning this piece to listen to many performances featuring different soloists get a clear vision of how the movement can and should be played. It is a Beethoven piece that frequently is played badly. A tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the first Minuet section and a tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the Trio section marked Più mosso. Accompaniments are available for this score with a four bar count in played on a two sounds of the wood block. Because of the tempo changes and the upbeat in the solo part there is a two beat click between the sections. Wood block sounds are recorded on one side of the stereo channel so that the sound can be silenced. Accompaniment 1 has a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 110 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 2 has a tempo of 108 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 116 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 3 has a tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 120 for the Trio section. This score was reviewed, revised with accompaniments added in 2020. A clarinet in A part appropriately transposed is appended to the music score. Although not quite correct the title Minuet in G has been retained for this movement.

Added: 2020-05-06 09:59:44

Minuet in G WoO 10 No.2 arr. bassoon & piano

A very appealing and familiar movement from the treasure trove of Beethoven’s works WoO (Without Opus number) Originally composed for orchestra, the manuscript was lost and the music has essentially been reconstructed from a piano arrangement. It is a melodic piece full of character and humour and this arrangement is for bassoon with piano accompaniment. In performance the Minuet is played with repeats followed by the Trio section marked Più mosso again with repeats. Finally, the first Minuet is repeated but this time without repeats. A rit. (slowing down) at the end of the two main sections (minuet and trio) is appropriate. The music editor urges those auditioning this piece to listen to many performances featuring different soloists get a clear vision of how the movement can and should be played. It is a Beethoven piece that frequently is played badly. A tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the first Minuet section and a tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the Trio section marked Più mosso. Accompaniments are available for this score with a four bar count in played on a two sounds of the wood block. Because of the tempo changes and the upbeat in the solo part there is a two beat click between the sections. Wood block sounds are recorded on one side of the stereo channel so that the sound can be silenced. Accompaniment 1 has a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 110 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 2 has a tempo of 108 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 116 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 3 has a tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 120 for the Trio section. This score was reviewed, revised with accompaniments added in 2020. A bassoon part is appended to the music score.

Added: 2020-05-06 09:48:00

Fugue in E (originally in G) BuxWV 175 arranged for guitar trio

The three part Fugue in E BuxWV 175 originates as an organ work but readily transcribes as music that can be a guitar ensemble. It is a movement featuring much imitation in the three lines of music. It is also divided into three sections and is more canzona than fugue. The music needs to be played very evenly with a lightness of touch. Entries of the subject in the voices need to be stated clearly. The challenge in playing music in this style is creating space and communicating the intentions and formal shape of the music. The playback tempo in the realisation is 76 quarter note beats to the minute but the movement can be played at a quicker tempo if preferred. Individual guitar parts are appended to the full score. There is minimal score detail in the sheet music score as is the convention with music from this era. The music editor also suggests listening to some of the organ versions that exist readily accessible on streaming media. Buxtehude 1637 – 1707 was an important compose of the mid-baroque period and an important influence on J. S. Bach, G.F. Handel and G. P. Telemann. Whilst described as a German composer he considered to be Danish himself though the place he was born is now in Sweden! His place of work from 1668 was St. Mary’s Church, (Marienkirche) Lübeck and apart from his vocal music composed for church contexts there is a substantial amount of music for organ including preludes, toccatas and fugues, chorale settings and pieces based on repeating bass lines or ostinatos.

Added: 2020-04-28 06:28:51

Fugue in G BuxWV 175 piano/organ

The three part Fugue in G BuxWV 175 originates as an organ work but readily transcribes as music that can be played on the piano. It is a movement featuring much imitation in the three lines of music. It is also divided into three sections and is more canzona than fugue. The music needs to be played very evenly with a lightness of touch. Entries of the subject in the voices need to be stated clearly. The challenge in playing music in this style is creating space and communicating the intentions and formal shape of the music. The playback tempo in the realisation is 72 quarter note beats to the minute but the movement can be played at a quicker tempo if preferred. There is minimal score detail in the sheet music score as is the convention with music from this era. The music editor also suggests listening to some of the organ versions that exist readily accessible on streaming media. Buxtehude 1637 – 1707 was an important compose of the mid-baroque period and an important influence on J. S. Bach, G.F. Handel and G. P. Telemann. Whilst described as a German composer he considered to be Danish himself though the place he was born is now in Sweden! His place of work from 1668 was St. Mary’s Church, (Marienkirche) Lübeck and apart from his vocal music composed for church contexts there is a substantial amount of music for organ including preludes, toccatas and fugues, chorale settings and pieces based on repeating bass lines or ostinatos. It is worth exploring music originally intended for the organ and harpsichord performance on the piano. Alan Feinberg’s CD “Fugal State” and Francesco Tristano “Long Walk” are two contemporary collections that include the keyboard music of Buxtehude played on the piano.

Added: 2020-04-28 06:15:46

Variations on “Ich denke dein” WoO 74 for piano duet (piano 4 hands)

The 6 Variations with Coda “Ich denke dein” for piano duet (piano 4 hands) were composed in 1803 and published in 1805. A quite delightful set of variations based on a song melody with a text that roughly translates as “I think of you when the sun shimmers on the sea” which suggests that the composer belongs more to the romantic than the classical era. sf means suddenly loud and is one of Beethoven’s most used score markings as is not unsurprisingly fp meaning loud going to soft. In Beethoven’s music the surprise element is always strong particularly in respect to dynamics and rhythmic accents which are often placed on the weaker beats of the bar. Time signatures appear at the beginning of the theme and also the beginning of each variation. All movements apart from Variations 3 and 5 are in common time. Tempos in Variation 3 and 5 are more relaxed and slower with the music notated in 2/2 time. As his sketch books show, Beethoven was particular fond of re-working and revising his composition ideas but there is always purpose and a clear sense of direction in his music. Use of the sustaining pedal is recommended but has not been indicated in the score. The lines of music are rhythmically independent which makes playing the trills in Variation 4 challenging. Beethoven is always interested in developing piano technique and there is evidence of this particularly in Variation 4. This particular variation took the music editor as much time to prepare as the rest of the work put together! The music editor suggests omitting the ornaments particularly in this variation in the first instance. Any pianists/keyboard players not sure of how the ornaments should be played should refer to the video score on the YouTube channel to see a suggested solution. In the video score the ornaments written out in full and it sounds exactly as the realisation available as the mp3 from the website. The playing of ornaments is much more interesting and challenging in Beethoven’s time. The Primo and Secondo can be downloaded separately as “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. The tempos are as follows in quarter note beats to the bar with the second figure indicating the half note or minim beat tempos for variations 3 and 5. There are three accompaniments: Accompaniment 1 104/46 Accompaniment 2 108/48 Accompaniment 3 112/50. There is a four bar count in /click on the accompaniment mp3. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-04-18 12:14:31

Manchega arr. flute, acoustic guitar & violoncello

This music was published in 1860. This arrangement for flute, acoustic guitar and violoncello playing pizzicato has a playback tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. Gottschalk’s music is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal quality and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score The small ornamental notes in the flute part (acciaccaturas or crushed notes) should be omitted whilst the movement is being learnt. It is then up to the player’s own discretion as whether to play them or not. Accompaniments have not been prepared for this arrangement. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-08 11:01:35

Manchega arr. mandolin & two acoustic guitars

This music was published in 1860. This arrangement for mandolin and two acoustic guitars has a playback tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. Gottschalk’s music is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal quality and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score The small ornamental notes in the mandolin part (acciaccaturas or crushed notes) do not sound in the realization. The music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion as whether to play them or not. The two acoustic guitar parts are available as accompaniments and can be downloaded as mp3 files at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. The mandolin may want to explore playing some of the sections at a different octave and in respect to this the PlentyMusic team would appreciate feedback.

Added: 2020-04-08 09:55:03

Manchega arr. three marimba players

This music was published in 1860! This pitched percussion arrangement is or 3 marimba players has a plays back tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the realization. The music editor has left the articulations markings from his masterscore simply because they help players understand the music even though many of the markings do not have a context in this particular arrangement. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the Gb section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced byChopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulations and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. Marimba parts 2 and 3 are available as an accompaniment and can be downloaded as mp3 files at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts in what must have been a very challenging working life. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-08 09:28:53

Manchega arr. trumpet in Bb & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in the key of Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. If you do spend time listening to the music of Gottschalk one senses the underlying influence of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The small ornamental notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play them or not. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. The music editor worked from an old print copy of the work and there were several ambiguities in the score so any feedback on detail would be much appreciated.

Added: 2020-04-08 08:09:19

Manchega arr. trombone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in F and the B section in Ab. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. A trombone part is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion as whether to play them or not. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is the influence of Chopin in the compositional style of Gottschalk. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the articulation of the notes and both tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 21:50:01

Manchega arr. tenor horn & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not play in the playback, They are in the score but are an optional addition. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. If you do spend time listening to the music of Gottschalk one senses the underlying influence of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play them or not. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 18:47:35

Manchega arr. euphonium & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in F and the B section in Ab. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure A euphonium part in the treble clef appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play them or not in a performance. There is a strong influence of Chopin in the music of Gottschalk particularly in the harmonic writing and figuration. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulations, tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 17:40:02

Manchega arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate his virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk composition approach is influenced particularly by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the articulations, dynamics and tonal range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. The small ornamental notes sound in the realization although the music editor suggests leaving them out c during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play or them or not.A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. The music editor worked from an old print copy of the work and there were several ambiguities in the score so any feedback on detail would be much appreciated.

Added: 2020-04-07 17:15:06

Manchega arr. violoncello & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realisation and it is then up to the player’s own discretion either to play them or not. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended for the accompanist but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s music is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. The small ornamental notes excluding the appoggiaturas do not sound in the realization. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 14:20:16

Manchega arr. viola & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. A viola part is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes are probably best left out during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion either playing or not playing them. There is a strong influence of Chopin in the music of Gottschalk. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 11:39:37

Manchega arr. violin & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended for the accompanist but is not indicated in the score. The music of Gottschalk is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics, tonal range and articulation in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. A violin part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 11:24:31

Manchega arr. oboe & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The small ornamental notes can be omitted particularly when learning the piece where rhythmic accuracy and precision is needed. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. An oboe part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 07:11:11

Manchega arr. English horn & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the realization is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The small ornamental notes can be omitted particularly when learning the piece where rhythmic accuracy and precision are needed. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A flute part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 06:59:14

Manchega arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is strongly influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamic and tonal range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A clarinet in B appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 06:45:09

Manchega arr. bassoon & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended for the accompanist but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s composing approach was influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation as well as dynamic and tonal range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. A bassoon part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 17:27:00

Manchega arr. alto saxophone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate his virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore how notes are articulated and the tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 17:17:27

Manchega arr. intermediate level piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World” whilst Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate piano technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate his virtuoso playing. This is an intermediate level arrangement with the playback tempo of the realisation being 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns in and shared between the hands are secure. The use of the sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. In bar 34 players are required to play both a Cb and a C natural. Gottschalk’s piano writing more than suggests the influence of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal range and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music.

Added: 2020-04-06 11:43:37

Manchega arr. flute & two acoustic guitars

The music arranger is amazed that this piece of music was published in 1860! This arrangement for flute and two acoustic guitars has a plays back tempo of 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the realisation. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The writing of Gottschalk is strongly influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the tonal range and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. The small ornamental notes – acciaccaturas or crushed notes in the flute part but not the appoggiatura do not sound in the realization. The two acoustic guitar parts are available as accompaniments and can be downloaded as mp3 files at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts in what was a very hard working life. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 11:01:17

Manchega arr. baritone horn & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in F and the B section in Ab. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. A baritone part in the treble appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Players who would like the music notated in the bass clef please advise the PlentyMusic Office. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether or not to play them. There is a strong influence of Chopin in the music of Gottschalk. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 10:14:51

Manchega arr. flute & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the realization is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The small ornamental notes can be omitted particularly when learning the piece where rhythmic accuracy and precision are needed. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A flute part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 10:01:04

Manchega arr. soprano saxophone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. The writing of Gottschalk is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 57 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 08:32:38

Bolero from 5 Spanish Dances for piano duet (piano 4 hands)

Moritz Moszkowski (1854 – 1925) was a German composer of Polish – Jewish descent who was an exceptional pianist and well known at the end of the 19th century as a concert pianist, conductor, composer and teacher. He was also a competent violinist. He composed many small-scale piano works of which his 5 Spanish Dances Opus 12 set are probably the best known existing in several formats. After moving to Paris in 1897 his health deteriorated from 1908 and his career quickly went into decline. From being rich and famous he soon lost all his money as a result of exchanging the copyrights on his music for government bonds which became worthless at the outbreak of the war in 1914. The Spanish sound is referenced by use of the phrygian mode which has the semi-tones between the first and second and the fifth and sixth degree of the scale - D Eb F G A Bb C D. The rhythmic shapes are from patterns associated with the Bolero which originated in Spain during the C18th as a form of ballroom dance and became a template and form used by many composers of art music. Music associated with particular countries and regions of Europe particular on its fringes became very popular towards the end of the 19th century in a movement that was known as nationalism. Moszkowski was a very well known composer artist in his own time but after his death like many composers his music disappeared from concert programmes. Score detail is in place for the whole movement simply for clarity. The suggested tempo to play this movement advised by the music editor is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute but a realistic and equally satisfactory tempo is 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There are two options as to how to play the trills . Either as in the video score which can be viewed on our YouTube channel or by playing semi quavers. One of the characteristics of a Bolero is that it they speed up at the end and this feature has been retained in the realizations and accompaniments. This Bolero is a great ensemble piece offering plenty of contrast and pianistic in the sense that it quite playable. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 96 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 104 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a four bar count in that features the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players. One of the characteristics of a Bolero is that it they speed up at the end and this feature has been retained in the realizations and accompaniments. This Bolero is a great ensemble piece offering plenty of contrast and pianistic in the sense that it quite playable. For those who want to explore the music of Moszkowski Étincelles (Sparks) from the Opus 72 set of Études is quite a movement often played as an encore at the end of a concert.

Added: 2020-03-14 07:48:16

Study in Canon No.1 Opus 56 arr. piano duet (piano 4 hands)

A movement with beauty, shape and a sense of space. The imitation principle is understandably very strong in this work composed, the music editor understands, when Schumann was intent on restoring rigour and confidence to his own compositional process. For the players there is surprisingly intensity and discipline needed to play this relatively short movement. Whilst this music references the past there is a romantic twist or two in the harmonic language. A tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the realisation. Trills begin on the note and have been written out in the first section of the score in the ossia staves. Understand that the melodic and rhythmic shapes of the ornaments are constant throughout the whole movement. The French word for study is Etude and those who develop or have developed a keen interest in music will be very aware of the many musical challenges associated with this word! Schumann’s Canonic Studies were composed in 1845 for pedal piano and subsequently arranged for piano duet / piano four hands by Georges Bizet. There are also other versions for organ, two pianos and string quartet. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 72 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 80 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a two bar count in with the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-03-05 11:15:26

Berceuse (Dolly Suite) arr. piano Duet (piano 4 hands)

A charming and quite beautiful piece which has been arranged for many different instrument combinations although its origins are as a piano duet. A berceuse is a lullaby or cradle song so a gentle lilting approach is a required with nothing happening abruptly. The realisation plays at 69 quarter note beats to the minute. When performing this music there is an opportunity to slow down at the ends of phrases and then return to tempo at the start of the next phrase. Markings to indicate this are not included in the score. Pedalling has been indicated in the score. The sustaining pedal is put down as the first sound at the beginning of the bar is being played and lifted on the second beat of the bar. Additional pedalling can be added even though it might not be indicated on the score but it should never muddy the texture and lines of the music. The modal element that features in much of Faure’s music is also evident. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 76 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a four bar count in with the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-03-04 15:07:39

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. euphonium & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for euphonium accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Euphonium players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A euphonium part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 09:41:19

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. baritone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for baritone accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Baritone players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A baritone horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 09:36:01

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. tenor horn & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for tenor horn accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Tenor horn players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 09:32:31

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for horn in F (French horn) accompanied by the piano the sounding key is F. Horn in F (French horn) players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A horn in F (French horn) part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:55:38

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. trombone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for trombone accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Trombone players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A trombone part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:51:47

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. tuba & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for tuba accompanied by the piano the sounding key is F. Tuba players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A tuba part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:45:31

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. trumpet in Bb & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for trumpet in Bb accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Trumpet players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:35:33

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. violoncello & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for violoncello accompanied by the piano the sounding key is D. Violoncello players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 18:46:14

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. viola & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for viola accompanied by the piano the sounding key is F. Violists players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A viola part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 18:34:55

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. violin & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for violin accompanied by the piano the sounding key is D. Violin players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A violin part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 18:19:12

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for tenor saxophone accompanied by the piano the sounding key in Eb. Tenor saxophone players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a feature of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A tenor saxophone part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 17:21:53

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. alto saxophone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for alto saxophone accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Flute players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. An alto saxophone part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 17:11:04

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. soprano saxophone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for soprano saxophone accompanied by the piano sounding in the key of Eb, the soloist should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 16:57:54

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. English horn & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for English horn accompanied by the piano sounding in the key of F, soloists should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 16:06:24

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. bassoon & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for bassoon accompanied by the piano the sounding key in D. Bassoon players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A bassoon is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 11:18:47

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb accompanied by the piano sounding in the key of Eb, soloists should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 10:39:36

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. oboe & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for oboe accompanied by the piano the sounding key in D. Oboe players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. An oboe part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-02 17:35:23

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. flute & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for flute accompanied by the piano the sounding key in D. Flute players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A flute part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 120 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 128 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-02 16:50:39

Children’s March in G for Piano Duet D.928 (Piano 4 Hands)

The Children’s March is an intermediate level piano duet. The repeats are played in the realization and the formal pattern can be summarized as follows. March: A A B B Trio: A A B B March Da Capo (No repeats) AB. This is a template that appears in much classical and romantic music. As is the convention the repeats are not played in the Da Capo repeat of the March. There is a great range of tempo explored in the many performances available of this march. The realization playback at 96 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. This is a characterful and appealing piece with enough contrast and charm to make it an interesting performance piece for both performers and audiences. No sustaining pedal is indicated in the sheet music score although its (minimal) use is suggested. Musical ideas are shared between the parts and players need to be sensitive with regard to the dynamics that they use. Many of Schubert’s greatest works are composed for piano duet and he made a substantial contribution to the repertoire. The composing context often related to his circle of friends for whom he would often write music. Whilst the Children’s March is a short work there are some substantial and large scale works also waiting to be explored. In the Trio section the triplets require a lightness in of touch in the way they are played. It is also important to understand that the Primo and Secondo parts are rhythmically independent. The accompaniment downloads that are available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 84 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 96 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. If players are using a metronome in their preparation then it might be sensible to play to a half note or minim beat. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-03-02 10:00:00

March No. 1 of Three Marches Opus 45 for piano duet (piano 4 hands)

The Three Marches Opus 45 for piano duet (piano 4 hands) were composed in 1803 and published in 1804. The march form features strongly in 19th century music. In March No.1 the composer does not quite follow convention in the formal arrangement and symmetry of the typical March and Trio. March No. 1 can be represented as follows - March A B B Trio A A B March Da Capo (no repeats) A B. The realisation and music scores are presented as the movement is performed so repeats where indicated are played. The score detail in Beethoven’s music is always interesting particularly regarding dynamics. Accents for example, are often placed on the weaker beats of the bar and the surprise element in a score is always strong. The playback score plays back at a standard march tempo of 60 half note beats to the minute. The Trio is played at the same tempo as the March. Beethoven is particularly fond of adding closing sections often referred to as codas and there is a lovely example from bars 36 to 40. This is an excellent movement for understanding Beethoven’s approach to composition in his so called “middle” period. While many of the musical elements are straightforward the composer’s desire to expand and develop form, harmony and process are constantly evident. In addition, Beethoven’s music always has a strong rhythmic focus. All the way through the movement musical ideas are shared and developed creating what is a great ensemble piece. The ornaments in the music of Beethoven and his contemporaries also offer more challenges than those of the classical era. There are considerations as far starting notes and the number of notes played in trills - trills at important cadences can add to the dynamic and intensity of a performance. You might notice that the video score has a 6 note trill played at the end of the March although in the realization it is played as a four note shape. The Primo and Secondo parts can be downloaded as “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the right channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the left channel. The tempos are as follows in quarter note beats to the bar Accompaniment 1 1112 Accompaniment 2 120 Accompaniment 3 126 There is a four bar count in /click on the accompaniment mp3. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players. It is a good idea for players to use a metronome in their preparation.

Added: 2020-03-02 09:40:46

Third Movement Molto presto from Keyboard Sonata for piano duet in B Flat K.358

The Molto presto third movement of the Sonata for piano duet in B flat K. 358 is a positive, joyous and like much of the composer’s music uplifting. The realization plays back at a tempo of 108 half note (minim) beats to the minute. The first repeat is played in the realization whilst the second repeat indicated in the sheet music score is not played. Multi-rests have not been used in the sheet music score but there are numbers in place indicating the empty bars in the sheet music score. This is a movement that does need to be played quickly and some of the tempi available on recordings are actually very challenging to play. The best advice is to start at a manageable tempo and then gradually increase it. The tempo of the movement as it is being played does however always need to be consistent. The music editor suggests setting a metronome to a half note (minim) beat minim beat in practice routines. There is opportunity for developing the “changing finger on a repeating note” technique and the playing of trills played by two hands requires careful practice. In the early stages of learning the movement the music editor suggests omitting the trills. For those wanting to see how the trills are played they can refer to the video score on our YouTube channel by clicking the appropriate link on the homepage of the website. The movement has many melodic shapes, textures and compositional processes characteristic of the composer and the music editor suggests that much can be learnt about the composer’s musical style by playing and listening to the piano duets. Mozart’s music always has a great sense of ensemble and his musical language is always consistent across the many musical forms that he embraced. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 100 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 104 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 108 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute There is a four bar count in featuring two different sounds of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-02-15 12:42:01

First Movement Allegro from Sonata for Piano Duet in B Flat K.358

The First Movement from the Sonata for Piano Duet in Bb K.358 for piano 4 hands is an intermediate level piano duet. The realization plays back at a tempo of 144 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Mozart composed many piano duets which he would often perform with his elder sister Nannerl. A lightness of touch is required in a performance and all notes need to be clearly articulated. There is some lovely sharing of the melodic ideas in the ensemble. Playing Mozart requires a consistent and even approach and the avoidance of exaggerated playing. As far as the ornaments are concerned players should be imitating each other in their delivery. Trills played by both hands together do require careful practice The music editors view on the playing of ornaments is that they should be played simply, rhythmically and consistently. This is music that is very much about melody and accompaniment and it is important for players to communicate its charm and beauty. The first repeat is played in the realization and the second repeat marked in the sheet music score is typically omitted in a performance. There are not many crescendo markings evident in many of the piano duet scores available simply because much of Mozart’s keyboard music was written with the harpsichord in mind. The harpsichord is able to offer a contrasting range of dynamics but not a gradual increase (crescendo) or decrease in sound (diminuendo).The piano or more accurately the fortepiano invented by Christofori was work in progress during Mozart’s lifetime but essentially early pianos were much thinner toned instruments compared to the iron framed pianos familiar to modern ears. The fp indication loud going to soft is one more typically associated with both the instruments and piano music of Beethoven. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 120 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 132 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 144 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute There is a four bar count in featuring two different sounds of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-02-15 09:49:53

Second Movement Adagio from the Sonata for Piano duet in B Flat K.358.

The Second Movement: Adagio from W.A. Mozart’s Sonata for Piano duet in Bb K.358 is an intermediate level piano duet. The Sonata, composed in the period 1773-74 in Salzburg was most probably intended to played by Mozart and his older sister, Nannerl. The realisation score plays back at a tempo of 58 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The first repeat is usually played in a performance whilst the second indicated in the sheet music score is usually omitted. Pianists and keyboard players do need to approach the work with a lightness of touch in their hands. When playing the movement as part of an ensemble one of the performing challenges is to maintain clarity in the texture and to communicate the melodic ideas and how these are shared between the players. Whilst not indicated in the score minimal use of the sustaining pedal is suggested. The octave playing in the Secondo part needs careful practice and occasional use of the fourth finger is also suggested for this particular passage. The trills particularly in the Primo part when they are played by both hands also require attention. No repeats are played in the realization. The challenge when playing Mozart is actually to make it sound like Mozart with a lightness of touch and beauty of sound. The SECONDO mp3 sound files can be downloaded from this page as mp3 “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the Primo part. These accompaniment sound files have the first repeat marked in the score played. Accompaniment 1 plays at 54 half note (minim) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 56 half note (minim) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 58 half note (minim) beats to the minute. If you wish to play the Secondo part then you need to find the page on the website which allows you to download the Primo accompaniments. A useful tip when playing music in a performance context is to print the music two pages of music on to one A4 sheet.

Added: 2020-02-14 18:12:07

Second Movement Adagio from the Sonata for Piano Duet in B Flat K.358

The Second Movement: Adagio from W.A. Mozart’s Sonata for Piano duet in Bb K.358 is an intermediate level piano duet. The Sonata, composed in the period 1773-74 in Salzburg was most probably intended to played by Mozart and his older sister, Nannerl. The realisation score plays back at a tempo of 58 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The first repeat is usually played in a performance whilst the second indicated in the sheet music score is usually omitted. Pianists and keyboard players do need to approach the work with a lightness of touch in their hands. When playing the movement as part of an ensemble one of the performing challenges is to maintain clarity in the texture and to communicate the melodic ideas and how these are shared between the players. Whilst not indicated in the score minimal use of the sustaining pedal is suggested. The octave playing in the Secondo part needs careful practice and occasional use of the fourth finger is also suggested for this particular passage. The trills particularly in the Primo part when they are played by both hands also require attention. No repeats are played in the realization. The challenge when playing Mozart is actually to make it sound like Mozart with a lightness of touch and beauty of sound. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 54 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 56 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 58 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute There is a two bar count in featuring two different sounds of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-02-14 17:38:59

Tico-Tico arr. mandolin + TAB and acoustic guitar + TAB

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for mandolin and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. The appended parts for both mandolin and acoustic guitar have TAB charts to support the conventionally notated copy. This syncopated piece is structured into three sections and can be represented formally as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version it is a piece that has travelled widely in various different formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 80 (2) 84 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 17:01:12

Tico-Tico arr. mandolin and acoustic guitar

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for mandolin and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. This syncopated piece is structured into three sections and can be represented formally as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version it is a piece that has travelled widely in various different formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. Both players are required to play from the full score. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 80 (2) 84 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 15:55:12

Tico-Tico arr. marimba and acoustic guitar + TAB

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for marimba and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. The appended part for the acoustic guitar also has a TAB chart to support the conventionally notated copy. The piece is structured into three sections and formally can be represented as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version and is a piece that has travelled widely in various formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. There is understandably in this Brazilian piece a strong syncopated element. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 80 (2) 84 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 15:46:12

Tico-Tico arr. marimba and acoustic guitar

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for marimba and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. This syncopated piece is structured into three sections which can be represented formally as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version it is a piece that has travelled widely in various different formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. Both players are required to play from the full score. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 80 (2) 84 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 15:02:23

Over the Waves arr. flute & piano

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most familiar of Latin American melodies. The waltz is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground. This improver level (second year players) movement in ternary ABA form is an ideal ensemble piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. A flute part is appended to the full score and the sounding key is Bb. Piano accompaniments are available as an mp3 download at tempi of (1) 56 (2) 58 and (3) 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-07 21:58:52

Over the Waves arr. pitched percussion (two marimbas)

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most well known Latin American pieces. The waltz melody is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground organs and was used for the song "The Loveliest Night of the Year" from the MGM film "The Great Caruso." This improver level (second year players) movement in ternary ABA form is an ideal ensemble piece. The realisation which features two marimbas playsback at 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and pitched percussion players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. Piano accompaniments are available as an mp3 download at tempi of (1) 56 (2) 58 and (3) 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-07 19:55:21

Over the Waves arr. piano solo (Melody + Chords)

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most familiar of all Latin American pieces. The waltz melody is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground organs and was used for the song "The Loveliest Night of the Year" from the MGM film "The Great Caruso." This improver level (second year players) movement is a melody accompanied by vamped chords The realisation plays back at 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and keyboard players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. The movement is in ternary form

Added: 2020-01-07 19:45:44

Over the Waves arr. piano solo (Two Part)

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most well known Latin American pieces. The waltz melody is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground organs and was used for the song "The Loveliest Night of the Year" from the MGM film "The Great Caruso." This improver level (second year player) movement is a two part version. The realisation plays back at 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. The movement is in ternary form.

Added: 2020-01-07 19:13:26

None but the Lonely Heart arr. solo piano

Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. For the pianist the challenge is to communicate the melody of the song with as much of the intended accompaniment as possible. In the transcription there has been some necessary editing of the chords and the technique of crossing hands will need to be explored by the keyboard player to ensure legato playing of the melody. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which the pianist will need to take into consideration during a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. Pianists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Songs are understandably often arranged in different keys and two versions are available in the pdf download the first in Eb and the second in D.

Added: 2020-01-03 14:29:46

None but the Lonely Heart arr. flute, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for flute accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the flute player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprising marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adds both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 09:31:41

None but the Lonely Heart arr. oboe, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for oboe accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the oboe player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprises marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adds both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 09:04:37

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violin, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for violin accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the violin player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprises marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 08:37:52

None but the Lonely Heart arr. viola, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for viola accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the viola player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprises marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute as an mp3 download. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 08:24:13

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violin & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for violin and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the soloist to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music and the music editor suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 21:17:29

None but the Lonely Heart arr. viola & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for viola and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the soloist to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music and the music editor suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 21:10:28

None but the Lonely Heart arr. oboe & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for oboe and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the soloist to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music and the music editor suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 20:57:39

None but the Lonely Heart arr. flute & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for flute and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the flute soloist to develop both control and quality of tone. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a both considerable musical and emotional range which suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 19:39:25

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violin & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Violin players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2)88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A violin part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 18:55:21

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violoncello & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Cellists should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1)84 (2)88 (3)92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A violoncello part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 17:00:59

None but the Lonely Heart arr. viola & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Viola players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A viola part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 13:35:09

None but the Lonely Heart arr. tuba & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Tuba players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A tuba part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 13:25:02

None But The Lonely Heart Heart arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Trumpet players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 13:19:45

None but the Lonely Heart arr. trombone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Trombone players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A trombone part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 12:50:35

None but the Lonely Heart arr. tenor horn & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Tenor horn players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A tenor horn part notated in the treble clef and appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 12:28:52

None but the Lonely Heart arr. euphonium & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Euphonium players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1)84 (2)88 (3)92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A euphonium part notated in the treble clef and appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 12:03:51

None but the Lonely Heart arr. baritone saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Baritone saxophone players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A baritone saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 11:40:19

None but the Lonely Heart arr. English horn & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Oboe players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 11:19:35

None but the Lonely Heart arr. bassoon & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A bassoon part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 17:24:11

None but the Lonely Heart arr. soprano saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 17:12:46

None but the Lonely Heart arr. tenor saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 16:23:10

None but the Lonely Heart arr. alto saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 15:55:32

None but the Lonely Heart arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Clarinet players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 15:34:40

None but the Lonely Heart arr. oboe & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Oboe players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. An oboe part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2019-12-31 16:13:49

None but the Lonely Heart arr. flute & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Flute players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 84 (2) 88 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A flute part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2019-12-31 16:07:12

Keyboard Sonata in D R.84

This is a stunning piece and often played as an encore. There are many fine performances of this work some of them taken at speeds that could be described as frightening. For the sake of clarity in communication the sheet music score is the same as the realisation or playback score. A plain score is also appended to the edited music score. This work needs to be played with the fingers close to the keys control and a light touch as many notes are played staccatissimo and the changing fingers on a note technique will need to be used. Where appropriate look for opportunities to use sequential fingering. The cadences can and should be played with more fluidity than is demonstrated in the realisation particularly if additional ornaments are added in the repeats. A tempo of 76 dotted quarter notes to the minute is used in the realisation and the work should be played with a one in the bar feel. If you can manage a tempo of 80 dotted quarter notes to the minute then music does really come alive The advice on playing the ornaments is to be consistent, maintain rhythmic symmetry and explore options in the repeat sections. The music editor has yet to find two performers who have the same or at least a similar approach to the playing of the ornaments and suggests that players should listen to various performances of the work. Padre Antonio Soler was a Spanish Catalan composer whose work belongs to the late Baroque and early Classical times. His best known works are his one movement sonatas which show the influenced by Domenico Scarlatti. Soler also took Holy Orders in his early 20’s and working at the monastery known as EL Escorial near to Madrid in Spain combining his duties as a monk with composition and teaching. His music was catalogued by Rubio early in the 20th century. This music is played on the harpsichord and piano whilst there are arrangements of this sonata for the harp and classical guitar.

Added: 2019-12-13 12:31:04

Prelude in G BWV 902

This prelude possibly dates from 1730 and is composed in four voices or lines of music with some sections having all voices sounding, whilst in others three and sometimes only two. It opens with a section that is almost vocal in character before it transforms into a keyboard piece. There are no ornaments indicated in the score although there is an extraordinary amount of detail in the rhythmic figuration. The B section which begins at Bar 29 has some almost toccata like shapes whilst a four octave range is explored in the keyboard writing. The tempo of the realisation and playback is 72 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are not played. The repeat bar is indicated by a double bar at the end of bar 28 and there is also one at the end of the final bar in the sheet music score. One challenge for the performer is communicating the layers and lines that exist in the music with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. Another is to play the movement at a tempo that is appropriate and which can be maintained for the whole movement. Some of the figuration in the score can be a challenge to play if the tempo is too fast. The piece can be performed AB, AAB and even AABB the latter making it quite a long piece. The music editor when learning the movement started with the final section bars 41-56, before playing bars 29-56 and then the piece as a whole. The specified fingering is appropriate for someone who can manage a reach of a 9th with both hands. A plain score is also appended to the edited music score.

Added: 2019-12-13 10:48:27

Piccolo Valzer

Puccini’s Piccolo Valzer dates from 1894 and but was revisited by the composer becoming Musetta’s Waltz “Quando me n’vo” in Act II of the opera “La Boheme.” It is interesting to play this waltz melody as a piano piece and the music editor suggests a Moderato tempo rather than Lento. The composer was inspired to write the work after a boat trip fishing on the lake close to his home. The playing instruction con ondulazione is a reference to ripples on the water. Pianists need to avoid playing with too heavy a touch and the sustaining pedal needs to be used or else the playing may sound on the lumpy side. This is marked in the sheet music score and be ready for some rather quick pedalling changes. The realisation plays at 94 quarter note beats to the minute. There is opportunity for the music to ebb and flow in respect to the tempo and the tempo rubato is a reference to this type of playing. There is some wonderful harmonic writing in this ternary form ABA work but avoid any exaggerated playing and aim to communicate the simplicity and beauty of the melody.

Added: 2019-12-13 09:45:08

Down By The Riverside arr. alto saxophone & piano

Down By The Riverside is a song that dates back to before the American Civil War but was not published until 1918. It can be described as an African American spiritual. There are many recorded versions dating as far back as the 1920’s and It was also familiar as an anti-war protest song during the Vietnam war. There are many versions of the lyrics which include Old Testament bible references. There are fine performances to be discovered by traditional jazz bands and singers that explore traditional, gospel and contemporary popular music styles. This arrangement sounds in the key of Eb and features syncopation in a march style. It is as an excellent introduction for learning to play in the 20th century popular idiom. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There is one accompaniment available that plays back at a tempo of 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-13 09:35:28

Down By The Riverside arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Down By The Riverside is a song that dates back to before the American Civil War but was not published until 1918. It can be described as an African American spiritual. There are many recorded versions dating as far back as the 1920’s and It was also familiar as an anti-war protest song during the Vietnam war. There are many versions of the lyrics which include Old Testament bible references. There are fine performances to be discovered by traditional jazz bands and singers that explore traditional, gospel and contemporary popular music styles. This arrangement sounds in the key of F and features syncopation in a march style. It is as an excellent introduction for learning to play in the 20th century popular idiom. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There is one accompaniment available that plays back at a tempo of 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-13 09:06:15

Down By The Riverside arr. flute & piano

Down By The Riverside is a song that dates back to before the American Civil War but was not published until 1918. It can be described as an African American spiritual. There are many recorded versions dating as far back as the 1920’s and It was also familiar as an anti-war protest song during the Vietnam war. There are many versions of the lyrics which include Old Testament bible references. There are fine performances to be discovered by traditional jazz bands and singers that explore traditional, gospel and contemporary popular music styles. This arrangement sounds in the key of C and features syncopation in a march style. It is as an excellent introduction for learning to play in the 20th century popular idiom. A flute part is appended to the full score. There is one accompaniment available that plays back at a tempo of 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-13 08:28:38

Elite Syncopations arr. intermediate level piano

Elite Syncopations is one of Scott Joplin best ragtime compositions. If you are not sure how to approach the playing of Joplin’s music listen to the composers own whose remastered piano rolls which are an excellent source of clarifying how this style of music should be performed. A tempo of 78 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is recommended in this arrangement for intermediate level piano which also has suggested fingering in place. The music sounds key in the original key of C.

Added: 2019-12-12 22:23:28

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. violoncello with piano accompaniment

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo of the realisation in the realisation plays at 63quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. Accompanists need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A trombone part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 17:39:03

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. arr. trombone & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime known particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The music has been transposed to sound in the key of F and the tempo in the realisation plays at 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. Accompanists need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A trombone part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 17:16:24

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The sounding key is Eb and the tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The uses of the sustaining pedal by the piano accompanist is recommended and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A trumpet in Bb appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 17:02:00

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The approach to this arrangement has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the video score which is available to view on our YouTube channel the ornaments have been written out although symbols have been used in the sheet music score which is available from the website. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The accompanist does need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 16:38:42

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. violin & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The accompanist does need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A violin part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 16:27:18

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The sounding key is Eb and the tempo of the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The accompanist does need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A clarinet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 16:12:12

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. oboe & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which can be found on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The uses of the sustaining pedal by the piano accompanist is recommended and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! An oboe part is appended to the full score.There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 15:34:41

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. flute & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which can be found on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The uses of the sustaining pedal by the piano accompanist is recommended and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A flute part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 64 (2) 66 and (3) 68 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 15:19:51

Odeon arr. solo piano

Odeon originates as a piano piece and dates from 1909. It is a lively rhythmic movement with syncopated shapes that needs to be played at a consistent tempo. This is the piano version in its original key with the realisation playing at a tempo of 92 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin.

Added: 2019-12-12 09:32:44

Odeon arr. flute, acoustic guitar and string bass

This arrangement of Odeon for flute, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The three individual instrument parts are also appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling or swaying in a dance context. The acoustic guitar and string bass as accompanying instruments needs to be played quite percussively communicate the energy of the movement. There are accompaniments featuring acoustic guitar and string bass available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-12 09:20:52

Odeon arr. marimba, acoustic guitar and string bass

This arrangement of Odeon for marimba, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The three individual instrument parts are also appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling or swaying in a dance context. The acoustic guitar and string bass as accompanying instruments needs to be played quite percussively communicate the energy of the movement. There are accompaniments featuring acoustic guitar and string bass available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-12 09:07:23

Odeon arr. bass trombone & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for bass trombone and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A bass trombone part part appended to the full score The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girdling or swaying in a dance context. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 13:35:20

Odeon arr. violoncello & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for violoncello and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music is in its original key although where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The violoncello part is notated in the tenor and bass clef and there is a part appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girdling or swaying in a dance context. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 12:18:59

Odeon arr. trombone & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for trombone and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A trombone part appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 11:18:14

Odeon arr. bassoon & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for bassoon and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The bassoon part is notated in the tenor and bass clef and a bassoon part is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 10:51:45

Odeon arr. baritone saxophone & piano

Odeon originates as a piano piece and dates from 1909. It is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns and the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed down a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A baritone saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 09:12:04

Odeon arr. alto saxophone & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for alto saxophone and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 08:47:06

Odeon arr. clarinet in B flat & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for clarinet in Bb and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed down a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 08:40:18

Odeon arr. flute & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for flute and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 92 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A flute part is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 88, 92 and 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 08:19:16

Sweet Dreams arr. saxophone choir/ quintet

An arrangement for soprano, two alto, tenor and baritone saxophones – 5 parts in total of this improver level ternary form (ABA) work from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and tone quality in the melody playing. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The score and parts can be downloaded as a one document pdf file from the website.

Added: 2019-12-09 20:55:10

Sweet Dreams arr. clarinet choir/ quintet

An arrangement for four clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet – 5 parts in total of this improver level ternary form (ABA) work from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and tone quality in the melody playing. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The score and parts can be downloaded as a one document pdf file from the website.

Added: 2019-12-09 20:38:15

Sweet Dreams arr. violin & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for violin accompanied by acoustic guitar of this ternary form work (ABA) from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase requiring a singing legato tone when performed. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. Whilst described as an improver level piece the guitar player’s part is obviously harder than the flute players. There are three guitar accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 20:34:31

Sweet Dreams arr. oboe & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for oboeaccompanied by acoustic guitar of this ternary form work (ABA) from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase requiring a singing legato tone when performed. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. There are three guitar accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 19:04:34

Sweet Dreams arr. flute & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for flute accompanied by acoustic guitar of this ternary form work (ABA) from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase requiring a singing legato tone when performed. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. Whilst described as an improver level piece the guitar player’s part is obviously harder than the flute players. There are three guitar accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:52:38

Sweet Dreams arr. violoncello & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a plain score part is appended to the edited music score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:46:28

Sweet Dreams arr. violin & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. Violinists may wish to try performing with a mute. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a violin part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:39:14

Sweet Dreams arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a horn in F (French horn) part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:28:34

Sweet Dreams arr. trombone & piano

21-12-21 This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a trombone part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:04:58

Sweet Dreams arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a trumpet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 12:07:25

Sweet Dreams arr. bassoon & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a bassoon part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 11:20:08

Sweet Dreams arr. tenor saxophone & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute and the music sounds in Bb. A tenor saxophone appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 11:13:18

Sweet Dreams arr. soprano saxophone & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute and the music sounds in Bb. A soprano saxophone appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 11:07:20

Sweet Dreams arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such indicative score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The clarinet range is also explored in this particular arrangement. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a clarinet in Bb part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-08 08:31:07

Sweet Dreams arr. oboe & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such indicative score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst an oboe part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-08 08:21:24

Sweet Dreams arr. flute & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such indicative score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a flute part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 20:09:55

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. violoncello and piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for violoncello accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for instrument players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor has suggested pedalling for some parts of the movement but the guiding principle is that pedalling relates very much to changes in the bass note. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvo?ák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvo?ák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 13:20:40

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. violin & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this original version for violin accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for instrument players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor has suggested pedalling for some parts of the movement but the guiding principle is that pedalling relates very much to changes in the bass note. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A violin part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 13:16:50

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. alto saxophone & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for alto saxophone accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the alto saxophone within its range. Antonín Dvo?ák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvo?ák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:57:29

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. tenor horn & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for tenor horn accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A tenor horn part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:51:13

Romantic Piece No. 1 arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for horn in F (French horn) accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A horn in F (French horn) appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:43:32

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for trumpet in Bb accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the alto saxophone within its range. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A trumpet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:37:23

Romantic Piece No. 1 arr. soprano saxophone & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for soprano saxophone accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the video score is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the soprano saxophone within its range. Antonín Dvo?ák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvo?ák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:16:38

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for clarinet in B flat accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback of the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvo?ák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvo?ák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:02:34

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. oboe & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for oboe accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback of the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for oboe players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the clarinet within its range. Antonín Dvo?ák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvo?ák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. An oboe part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 11:52:49

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. flute & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for flute accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for flute players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling for the whole movement is in place with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the flute within its range. Antonín Dvo?ák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvo?ák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A flute part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 11:15:51

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. solo piano

An arrangement by the composer for solo piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions.

Added: 2019-12-05 12:17:11

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. flute & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for flute and acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the trumpet melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 12:04:18

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. oboe & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for oboe and acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 11:10:21

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. violin & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for violin and acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 10:43:21

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. two acoustic guitars

An arrangement two acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the acoustic guitar 1 melody. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar 2 accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 10:28:13

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. marimba & piano

An arrangement for pitched percussion (marimba) and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Accompanying pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A marimba part is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 10:13:05

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. violoncello & piano

An arrangement for violoncello and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Accompanying pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A violoncello part is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 18:52:40

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. violin & piano

An arrangement for violin and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Accompanying pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A violin part is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 18:41:15

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. trombone & piano

An arrangement for trombone and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the trombone melody. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A trombone part is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 18:08:26

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

An arrangement for trumpet in Bb and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the trumpet melody. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 17:45:09

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. bassoon & piano

An arrangement for bassoon and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the bassoon melody. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A bassoon part is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 17:21:42

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. tenor saxophone & piano

An arrangement for tenor saxophone and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the tenor saxophone melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 16:34:57

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. alto saxophone & piano

An arrangement for alto saxophone and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the alto saxophone melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 15:59:38

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. oboe & piano

An arrangement for oboe and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. An oboe part is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-04 15:36:13

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. flute & piano

An arrangement for flute and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a spirited sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Accompanying pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. Additionally, it is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The score detail relating to the use of the sustaining pedal possibly needs clarifying in that what is possibly required is not always indicated. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-03 19:54:57

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. marimba & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for marimba and acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-02 15:17:25

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

An arrangement for clarinet in Bb and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the clarinet melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-02 12:31:18

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. viola & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for viola with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 57 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A viola part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-11-16 11:00:08

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. violin & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for tuba with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 57 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A violin part transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-11-16 10:41:53

First Movement from Keyboard Sonata in C K.19d piano 4 hands

The First Movement from the Keyboard Sonata in C K.19d for piano 4 hands is an intermediate level piano duet. The realization plays back at a tempo of 60 half note (minim) beats to the minute. The music editor suggests 64 minim beats to the minute as an ideal tempo for playing the movement. A light touch is required in a performance and all notes need to be clearly articulated. Playing Mozart requires a very consistent and even approach and the avoidance of exaggeration. As far are ornaments are concerned players should be imitating each other in their delivery. The short trill is a simple 4 note shape. This is music that is very much about melody and accompaniment and it is important for players to communicate its charm and beauty. The music editor’s preference is for a dry acoustic which is appropriate for the music and instruments of the period. This sonata is likely to have been performed by the young Mozart with his elder sister Nannerl on a visit to London where the performing instrument was likely to have been a harpsichord. The music was only discovered in 1921 and whilst in the past it has been attributed to W.A Mozart the current view is that it was more probably composed by either his older sister Nannerl or his father Leopold. Suffice to say that much of Mozart's classical musical style is demonstrated in this sonata whichever one of the family composed it! The sonata has some very appealing musical content and as a work, most probably written by a child, it is interesting to play and compare to W.A. Mozart's later and more substantial piano 4 hands music such as the piano Sonata for Piano 4 hands in C K.521. There are several variants in terms of the scores available but the sheet music score and realisations are based on current performance practice. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 half note beats (minim) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 64 half note beats (minim) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 68 half note beats (minim) to the minute. There is a 4 bar count in featuring the sound of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2019-11-16 08:47:02

Tarantella arr. acoustic guitar + TAB and acoustic guitar + chord chart

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for acoustic guitar + TAB and acoustic guitar + chord chart has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and others have contributed music to the tarantella repertoire. Guitar accompaniments can also be downloaded to provide an ensemble experience. These are at tempi of (1) 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (2) 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and (3) 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-11-15 20:40:12

Tarantella arr. mandolin + TAB and acoustic guitar

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for mandolin + TAB and acoustic guitar has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and others have contributed music to the tarantella repertoire. Guitar accompaniments can also be downloaded to provide an ensemble experience. These are at tempi of (1) 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (2) 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and (3) 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-11-15 20:33:11

Tarantella arr. piano

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for solo piano has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and other serious composers have also contributed music to the tarantella repertoire.

Added: 2019-11-15 20:24:55

Tarantella arr. mandolin and acoustic guitar

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for mandolin and acoustic guitar has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and others have contributed music to the tarantella repertoire. Guitar accompaniments can also be downloaded to provide an ensemble experience. These are at tempi of (1) 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (2) 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and (3) 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-11-15 20:20:25

Tarantella arr. marimba & acoustic guitar

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for marimba and acoustic guitar has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and others have contributed music to the tarantella repertoire. Guitar accompaniments can also be downloaded to provide an ensemble experience. These are at tempi of (1) 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (2) 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and (3) 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-11-15 20:15:07

Tarantella arr. two acoustic guitars

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for two acoustic guitars has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and others have contributed music to the tarantella repertoire. Guitar accompaniments can also be downloaded to provide an ensemble experience. These are at tempi of (1) 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (2) 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and (3) 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-11-15 17:44:19

Tarantella arr. violin & acoustic guitar

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for violin and acoustic guitar has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and others have also contributed music to the tarantella repertoire. . Guitar accompaniments can also be downloaded to provide an ensemble experience. These are at tempi of (1) 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (2) 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and (3) 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-11-15 17:32:36

Tarantella arr. flute & acoustic guitar

A tarantella is a fast energetic traditional folk dance in 6/8 time. It has a characteristic upbeat and is associated with strong emotions and passions in the many forms of the dance that exist. Some examples of the dance explore the supernatural and others magic and spirituality. Its origins are a dance for couples from Southern Italy with tambourines frequently used to accompany the dancers. This particularly arrangement for flute and acoustic guitar has 4 strains of music ABCD with each strain repeated. The playback tempo is 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many melodic variants and arrangements of this music. Chopin, Gottschalk, Britten and others have contributed music to the tarantella repertoire. Guitar accompaniments can also be downloaded to provide an ensemble experience. These are at tempi of (1) 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (2) 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and (3) 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-11-15 17:17:55

Scriabin Piano Prelude in C# minor Opus 22 No.2

This piano prelude dates from 1897. Whilst Scriabin was famous and his importance recognised in his lifetime his music has been largely ignored and forgotten since his death. His musical language is frequently extremely chromatic and dissonant whilst his early works can be described as belonging to the late romantic period in music history and are essentially tonal works.Many of his preludes and short works are both beautiful and challenging pieces of music and are deserving of more attention and being played. This particularly piece has been popularised by the American group the Punch Brothers on their album Phosphorescent Blues. As a young composer Scriabin was influenced by Chopin but in his later life he became pre-occupied with mysticism and theosophy in time becoming identified as a symbolist composer.

Added: 2019-11-15 09:15:36

Norwegian Dance No. 2 arr. piano four hands

Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was very fortunate in that he was able to source several folk music collections on which to compose and arrange music. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and this is an excellent performance piece. There are also many arrangements of the piece to be explored for various combinations of instruments. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 64 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and 104 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute for the faster section, Accompaniment 2 at 66 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and 108 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute for the faster section, Accompaniment 3 at 68 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and 112quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute for the faster section There is a four bar count in featuring two different sounds of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2019-11-15 08:46:53

Military March No.1 (Marche Militaire) Opus 51 arr. piano 4 hands

The Military March No. 1 Opus 51 D.733 was published in 1826 along with two other marches although it was more than likely composed some years before this date. It was intended to be a teaching piece. The March is in the key of D with the Trio section in the sub-dominant key of G. This work for piano four hands or piano duet has become one of Schubert’s most popular works. There are many arrangements for a range of different instrument combinations. The music is both tuneful and rhythmic. The March and the succeeding Trio are both in AB binary form with the repeats being played. The March is repeated at the end of the Trio without repeats so the form in performance can be summarised by the letters AABBCCDDAB. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which is a tempo the music editor suggests the music really comes alive. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 116 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 120 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a four bar count in with a woodblock sound. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2019-11-15 08:29:24

Rondo Keyboard Sonata in C K.19d piano 4 hands

The Rondo from the Keyboard Sonata in C K.19d for piano 4 hands is an intermediate level piano duet. It is believed that this work dates from 1765 and was possibly played by Mozart and his sister on a visit to London when more than likely it was played on a harpsichord. A rondo is a piece with a recurring theme and the form of this movement can be represented by the letters A B A C A D A E A. The realization plays back at a tempo of 110 quarter note beats to the minute. Each section is played at the same tempo apart from the Adagio E section. The appoggiaturas marked in the score can be and are interpreted differently by different performers. The music was only discovered in 1921 and whilst in the past it has been attributed to W.A Mozart the current view is that it was more probably composed by either his older sister Nannerl or his father Leopold. Suffice to say there is much of Mozart's classical musical style in this sonata whichever one of the family composed it! The sonata has some very appealing musical content and as a work, most probably written by a child, it is interesting to play and compare to W.A. Mozart's later and more substantial piano 4 hands music such as the piano Sonata for Piano 4 hands in C K.521. There are several variants in terms of the scores available but the sheet music score and realisation are based on current performance practice. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 110 quarter note beats (crotchets) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 106 quarter note beats (crotchets) to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 110 quarter note beats (crotchets) to the minute There is a 4 bar count in featuring the sound of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2019-11-09 10:50:00

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. tuba & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for tuba with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A tuba part transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-30 13:55:25

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. trombone & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for trombone with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of F. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-30 13:35:57

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. tenor horn & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for tenor horn with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of F. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-30 13:17:51

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for trumpet in Bb with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-30 12:52:15

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for horn in F (French horn) with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A horn in F (French horn) appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-30 11:48:36

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. bassoon & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for bassoon with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A bassoon part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-30 11:24:11

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. tenor saxophone & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for tenor saxophone with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-29 17:21:14

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. alto saxophone & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for alto saxophone with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-29 17:00:38

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. soprano saxophone & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-29 16:07:24

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for clarinet in Bb with piano accompaniment sounds in the key of F. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-29 15:42:23

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. clarinet in A & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for clarinet in A with piano accompaniment is in the key of A. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A clarinet in A part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-29 13:26:40

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. English horn & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for English horn with piano accompaniment is in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-29 13:00:16

Pavane pour une infante défuncte arr. oboe & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both a legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for oboe with piano accompaniment is in the key of G. The pavane has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composer’s own language has also been retained in the language used in the score. The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. An oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-29 09:32:33

Pavan pour une infante défuncte arr. flute & piano

The origins of the music are as a piano piece composed in 1899 when Ravel was studying with Fauré. It exists in several arrangements and was popularised as a piano piece by the Spanish pianist Ricardo Viñes. Players should be aiming for both legato and beauty of tone in their playing. The music editor suggests an initial tempo of 63 quarter note beats to the minute in the first instance and as confidence and competence grows possibly slowing the tempo. The aspect of performing music at the correct tempo in a slow piece is quite challenging for players. This is quite a full arrangement for the solo player. However because of its sectional structure A (12 bars) B (7 bars) B’ (8 bars) A’ (12 bars) C (10 bars )C’ (10 bars) A’’ (13 bars). It becomes an easy matter to shorten the arrangement by simply omitting some of the repeating sections. Players may wish to advise the PlentyMusic Office of some fine tuning that the arrangement requires in respect to its playability. If there is a need for some cut down or shortened accompaniments please again advise the PlentyMusic Office and these will be made available. There are several arrangements of this music in existence and the intention of this one has been to keep as close to the original piano score as possible. This arrangement for flute with piano accompaniment is in the key of G. The Pavan has its origins as an Italian 16th century slow stately dance. Referencing past musical forms in their works became popular among Ravel’s contemporaries including Debussy. The cue sized decorative notes can be omitted whilst the piece in the early stages of studying the piece.The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and there are opportunities for give and take in the tempo particularly at the end of phrases. This is an ambitious and complete arrangement Ravel’s piece. Time does need to be spent understanding the musical texture and the lines of music. The composers own language has also been retained in the language used in the score The chromatic sections require careful study in terms of the notes to be played whilst the phrase endings often explore parallel movement in a characteristic sweep. Ravel frequently avoids the use of thirds in final chords of sections. The barring that is in place is to help the player to make the rhythmic connections in the movement. Performers should listen to a number of different performances played by different instruments to get a good overview of how the music can be best performed. The bold ending is a very characteristic feature of the original piano score and the suggestion is that it should be retained. The use of the piano sustaining pedal markings are not indicated in the score but its use is required. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 1=57, 2=60 and 3=63 quarter note beats to the minute. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-10-28 13:19:33

Minuet and Trio Keyboard Sonata in C K.19d piano 4 hands

The Minuet and Trio for piano 4 hands from the Keyboard Sonata in C K.19d is an intermediate level piano duet. It is believed that this work dates from 1765 and was possibly played by Mozart and his sister on a visit to London when more than likely it was played on a harpsichord. The music was only discovered in 1921 and whilst in the past it has been attributed to W.A Mozart the current view is that it was more probably composed by either his older sister Nannerl or his father Leopold. Suffice to say there is much of Mozart's classical musical style in this sonata whichever one of the family composed it. The sonata has some very appealing musical content and as a work, most probably written by a child, it is interesting to play and compare to W.A. Mozart's later and more substantial piano 4 hands music such as the piano Sonata for Piano 4 hands in C K.521. There are several variants in terms of the scores available but the sheet music score and realisation are based on current performance practice. The pattern that the of this music in performance is Minuet AABB Trio AABB followed by a repeat of the Minuet without repeats AB. The video score plays back at a tempo of 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The tempi of the minuet and trio sections are the same. Pianists and keyboard players do need to approach the work with a lightness of touch which is perhaps not suggested in the realisation. All notes need to be clearly articulated but duettists need to remember that the piece is very much about melody and accompaniment and it is the top line which needs to prevail. The music editor is keen to have feedback in respect to the accompaniment particularly in regard to the tempo that has been suggested. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 112 plays at quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 120 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute at beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 126 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a 2 bar count in featuring the sound of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2019-09-20 08:40:15

Shenandoah arr. brass quartet

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s.The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for a brass quartet comprising trumpet or cornet in Bb, tenor horn, baritone and tuba sounding in the key of Eb. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and individual parts appropriately transposed are appended to the full score. The music editor is quite happy to respond to requests for an arrangement that includes other brass instruments. Please advise the PlentyMusic office.

Added: 2019-09-20 07:49:38

Shenandoah arr. clarinet quartet

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for a clarinet quartet comprising 3 clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet sounding in the key of Eb. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and individual parts appropriately transposed are appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-20 07:43:43

Shenandoah arr. string quartet

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for a string quartet of 2 violins, viola and violoncello sounding in the key of D. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and individual parts are appended to the full score. The violin 1 has the option of playing the repeat at the octave.

Added: 2019-09-20 07:39:59

Shenandoah arr. saxophone quartet

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for a saxophone quartet of soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophones sounding in the key of Eb. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and individual parts appropriately transposed are appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-20 07:35:42

Shenadoah arr. violin & acoustic guitar

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for violin accompanied by acoustic guitar. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and violinist has the option of playing back the repeat at the octave.

Added: 2019-09-20 07:21:53

Shenadoah arr. flute & acoustic guitar

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for flute accompanied by acoustic guitar. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-09-20 07:09:20

Shenadoah arr. violin & acoustic guitar + TAB

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for violin accompanied by acoustic guitar. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and violinist has the option of playing back the repeat at the octave. This score has the acoustic guitar part in both conventional notation and TAB.

Added: 2019-09-20 06:58:48

Shenadoah arr. flute & acoustic guitar +TAB

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s.The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for flute accompanied by acoustic guitar. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute. This score has the acoustic guitar part in both conventional notation and TAB.

Added: 2019-09-20 06:53:55

Shenandoah arr. violoncello & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for violoncello accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a violoncello part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-19 12:22:20

Shenandoah arr. violin & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for violin accompanied by piano with the violinist having the option of playing the repeat at the octave. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a violin part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-19 12:18:05

Shenandoah arr. tuba & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s.The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in Eb is for tuba accompanied by piano. The tuba player also has the option of playing the repeat an octave higher. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a tuba part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-19 12:09:27

Shenandoah arr. trombone & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in F is for trombone accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-19 11:44:26

Shenandoah arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in Eb is for trumpet in Bb accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-19 11:13:03

Shenandoah arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in F is for a Horn in F (French horn) accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a horn in F (French horn) part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-19 10:55:03

Shenandoah arr. baritone saxophone & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in Eb is for baritone saxophone accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a baritone saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 16:13:53

Shenandoah arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in Eb is for tenor saxophone accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 15:46:04

Shenandoah arr. alto saxophone & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. This arrangement sounding in Eb is for alto saxophone accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and an alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 15:36:51

Shenandoah arr. soprano saxophone & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in Eb is for soprano saxophone accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 15:20:09

Shenandoah arr. clarinet in B flat & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s.The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in Eb is for clarinet in Bb accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 11:58:26

Shenandoah arr. English horn & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement sounding in D is for English horn accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and an English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 11:40:50

Shenandoah arr. oboe & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for oboe accompanied by piano. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and an oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 11:20:29

Shenandoah arr. flute & piano

Shenandoah is a traditional American folk song dating from the 19th century. The song exists in many forms and arrangements becoming popular as a sea shanty in the 1800’s. The beautiful yet powerful melody is suited to being both sung and played as an instrumental. The melody is also quite expansive and clearly open to different interpretations. This arrangement is for flute accompanied by piano with the flautist having the option of playing the repeat an octave higher. The playback tempo is 84 quarter note beats to the minute and a flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-09-18 09:55:29

La biondina in gondoleta arr. solo piano or keyboard

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement for solo keyboard or piano sounding in the key of G with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. The first verse is a fairly straightforward two part version of the song and then in the second version or repeat the texture is more complicated intending to stretch the player. The music editor is keen on keyboard and piano players returning to a piece of music that can clearly demonstrate evidence of progression.

Added: 2019-09-01 20:41:49

La biondina in gondoleta arr. violin & acoustic guitar

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement for violin accompanied by acoustic guitar sounding in the key of G with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. The violin player has the option of playing the repeat at the octave although this is not indicated in the score. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-08-30 09:29:16

La biondina in gondoleta arr. oboe & acoustic guitar

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement for oboe accompanied by acoustic guitar sounding in the key of G with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar.. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-08-30 09:17:38

La biondina in gondoleta arr. two acoustic guitars + TAB

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement for two acoustic guitars sounding in the key of G with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The appended guitar parts also notated in both conventional music notation and TAB. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments (Guitar 2) are available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-08-30 09:05:12

La biondina in gondoleta arr. two acoustic guitars

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement for two acoustic guitars sounding in the key of G with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments (Guitar 2) are available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-08-30 08:42:56

La biondina in gondoleta arr. flute & acoustic guitar

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement for flute accompanied by acoustic guitar sounding in the key of G with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet)beats to the minute. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. The flute player has the option of playing the repeat at the octave. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-08-30 07:59:10

La biondina in gondoleta arr. mandolin & acoustic guitar

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement for mandolin accompanied by acoustic guitar sounding in the key of G with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. The mandolin player may wish to edit the suggested tremolo playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-08-30 07:32:19

La biondina in gondoleta arr. horn in F & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The word barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for horn in F with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A horn in F part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 20:19:19

La biondina in gondoleta arr.trumpet in Flat & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The word barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for trumpet in Bb with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 19:09:23

La biondina in gondoleta arr. arr. baritone & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for baritone with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A baritone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 18:50:21

La biondina in gondoleta arr. trombone & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The word barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for trombone with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 18:02:10

La biondina in gondoleta arr. tuba & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for tuba with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A tuba part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 17:49:35

La biondina in gondoleta arr. tenor horn & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for tenor horn with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 16:48:27

La biondina in gondoleta arr. arr. violoncello & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for violoncello with piano accompaniment the sounding key is G. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A violoncello part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 16:35:57

La biondina in gondoleta arr. viola & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” feature several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for viola with piano accompaniment the sounding key is D. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A viola part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 15:53:33

La biondina in gondoleta arr. violin & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for tenor horn with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A violin part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 15:26:35

La biondina in gondoleta arr. bassoon & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for bassoon with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A bassoon part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 11:13:34

La biondina in gondoleta arr. baritone saxophone & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet)beats to the minute. In this arrangement for alto saxophone with piano accompaniment the sounding key is Eb. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A baritone saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 10:22:13

La biondina in gondoleta arr. tenor saxophone & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for tenor saxophone with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 10:10:15

La biondina in gondoleta arr. alto saxophone & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The word barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for alto saxophone with piano accompaniment the sounding key is Eb. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 09:50:30

La biondina in gondoleta arr. soprano saxophone & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 09:46:24

La biondina in gondoleta arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb with piano accompaniment the sounding key is F. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should be aiming for a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. An clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-29 08:37:28

La biondina in gondoleta arr. English horn & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for flute with piano accompaniment the sounding key is D. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should aim to play with both a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-28 16:27:43

La biondina in gondoleta arr. oboe & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement for flute with piano accompaniment the sounding key is G. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should aim to play with both a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. An oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-28 12:58:18

La biondina in gondoleta arr. flute & piano

The origins of this piece are as a Venetian song about gondolas (boats) and gondoliers (those steering and propelling the boats). Themes often expressed by gondoliers do tend to be about the romantic side of life. The words barcarola or barcarolle are used to describe the folk songs sung by Venetian gondoliers and they are usually in 6/8 time and played at a moderate (lilting) tempo featuring a rhythmic pattern reminiscent of the gondolier’s oar stroke. Romantic composers were particularly fond of composing barcarolles and Mendelssohn’s “Song without Words” features several. This is an improver level arrangement with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The repeat is played sounding an octave higher. In this arrangement for flute with piano accompaniment the sounding key is G. This is an excellent performance piece because the melody is appealing and familiar. Players should aim to play with both a lightness in their approach and a legato in their playing. Time spent listening to recordings of this melody particularly by singers will help players learn how to approach a musical performance. Accompaniments are also available at tempos of 60, 63 and 66 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-28 12:44:46

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. two guitars and bass guitar with TAB

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for two guitars (electric or acoustic) and bass guitar in the key of D. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the bass player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. There are TAB scores for the Guitar 1 part and bass guitarist whilst chord shapes are indicated in the Guitar 2 part.These are appended to the full score. The accompaniment mp3 features a string bass in the playback.

Added: 2019-08-14 08:47:51

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. flute, acoustic guitar and bass guitar

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for flute, acoustic guitar and string bass in the key of D. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the bass player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. The flute has the option of playing the repeat at the octave as indicated in the score. Chords have also been indicated in the guitar score and there is a TAB score for the bass guitarist. Individual parts are also appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-14 08:39:00

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. marimba, acoustic guitar and bass guitar

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for pitched percussion (marimba), acoustic guitar and bass guitar in the key of D. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the bass player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. The marimba player has the option of playing the repeats an octave higher whilst chords shapes have been indicated in the guitar score and the bass guitar is notated both conventionally and TAB. Individual parts are appended to the full score. The accompaniment mp3 features a string bass in the playback.

Added: 2019-08-14 08:19:51

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. banjo, acoustic guitar and bass guitar

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for banjo, acoustic guitar and bass guitar in the key of D. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the bass player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. There are conventionally notatated and TAB scores for the banjo and bass guitar parts whilst chords have also been indicated in the guitar score. Individual parts are appended to the full score. The accompaniment mp3 features a string bass in the playback.

Added: 2019-08-14 07:50:47

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. violin, acoustic guitar and bass guitar (with TAB)

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for violin, acoustic guitar and bass guitar in the key of D. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the bass player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. The violinist has the option of playing the repeat at the octave as indicated in the score. Chords have also been indicated in the guitar score and there is a TAB score for the bass guitarist. Individual parts are also appended to the full score. The accompaniment mp3 features a string bass in the playback.

Added: 2019-08-14 07:39:02

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. saxophone quintet

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for saxophone quintet sounding in the key of F. There are parts for parts for soprano, 2 x alto, tenor and baritone saxophones. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist keyboard player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. Individual parts for the five instruments are appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 17:32:37

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. clarinet in B Flat choir

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for clarinet choir sounding in the key of F. There are parts for 4 clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist keyboard player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. Individual parts for the five instruments are appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 17:25:18

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. piano in D

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for solo piano or keyboard in the key of D. The challenge for the piano/keyboard player is to keep the melody line singing out over the accompaniment. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist keyboard player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. Chords have also been indicated in the score as is the convention in popular music.

Added: 2019-08-13 17:19:42

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. piano in C

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for solo piano or keyboard in the key of C. The challenge for the piano/keyboard player is to keep the melody line singing out over the accompaniment. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist keyboard player is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. Chords have also been indicated in the score as is the convention in popular music.

Added: 2019-08-13 17:12:49

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. violin & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for violin and piano in the key of D. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A violin part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 17:04:57

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. marimba & piano in C

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for pitched percussion (a marimba sounds in the realisation) and piano in the key of C. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A marimba part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 16:46:19

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. marimba & piano in D

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for pitched percussion (a marimba sounds in the realisation) and piano in the key of D. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A marimba part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 16:30:46

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. trombone & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for trombone and piano sounding in the key of F. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 16:22:05

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. baritone & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for baritone and piano sounding in the key of F. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A baritone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 16:04:41

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. trumpet in Bb & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for trombone and piano sounding in the key of F. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 08:45:20

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. tenor saxophone & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for tenor saxophone and piano sounding in the key of F. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 08:37:27

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. alto saxophone & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for clarinet in Bb and piano in the key of F. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 08:11:12

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. soprano saxophone & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for clarinet in Bb and piano in the key of F. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 08:01:48

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for clarinet in Bb and piano in the key of F. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A clarinet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 07:54:00

When The Saints Go Marching In arr. flute & piano

When The Saints Go Marching In arranged for flute and piano in the key of C. The playback tempo is 100 half note or minim beats to the minute whilst the music is notated in cut time. Traditional American music songs such as “When The Saints Go Marching In” are excellent pieces for developing an understanding of the style elements associated with the performance of 20th century popular music. There is opportunity for players to explore the arrangement - the bass line played by the pianist is open to being played with some rhythmic variation particularly during the playing of the repeat sections. Many melodies and lyrics that are recognised as spirituals are often a synthesis of several songs that had their origins as work songs before, during and after the American Civil War. Songs sung from the 1850’s and onwards were perhaps published around 1918 and then first recorded in the 1920’s. The history of the song is well documented and many there are performances to be discovered embracing a range of styles and different types of performing group. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-13 07:24:15

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. violoncello & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A violoncello part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 18:31:15

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. viola & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A viola part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 17:35:17

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. arr. violin & piano

Paisiello was an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A violin part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 16:59:56

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. arr. tuba & piano

Paisiello was an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A tuba part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 16:45:43

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. arr. tenor horn & piano

Paisiello was an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 15:26:27

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. baritone & piano

Paisiello was an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A baritone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 15:08:48

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. arr. trombone & piano

Paisiello was an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 14:54:05

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. arr. trumpet in Bb & piano

Paisiello was an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A trumpet part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 14:40:58

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. horn in F & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A horn in F (French horn) part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 14:05:09

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. baritone saxophone & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicia The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. ns playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A baritone saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 13:40:39

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. bassoon & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A bassoon part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 13:23:05

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicia The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. ns playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 13:14:08

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. soprano saxophone & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores . Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 12:41:46

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. alto saxophone & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores . Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 12:28:50

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 11:47:00

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. English horn & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 11:17:29

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. oboe & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is not played in the playback score but is in the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores. Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. An oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 10:59:12

Nel cor più non mi sento arr. flute & piano

Paisiello was known as an opera composer and his best known melody “Nel cor più mi sento” is from his opera La Molinara. Beethoven used the melody as a theme for a set of piano variations in his Works without opus number 70 (WoO70). Paisiello became a Naples based composer contemporary with Cimararosa and Piccini although he was always very jealous of any rivals work wherever he worked and this included Paris, for Napoleon and St. Petersburg for Catherine II. Naples in the 18th and early 19th century was an important musical centre with the San Carlo Opera Theatre opening in 1737. There are many tunes from the past that are worthy of being re-discovered and this arrangement is intended for improver level instrumentalists. Bar 26 has been re written as a 9/8 bar simply to clarify how the ornaments should be played. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 54 dotted quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and accompaniments are available at this and two other tempi (1 = 54, 2 = 52 and 3 = 56 dotted quarter note beats to the bar). The repeat is played at the octave in the playback score and alsoin the accompaniment track. The Italian term Adagio has been used to describe the tempo in the sheet music scores . Note that the pause markings are ignored in the accompaniments but for those musicians playing with a pianist there is an opportunity to pause on the indicated sheet music markings and even create a break in the music. The movement does need to be played with a clear sense of pulse and rhythmic awareness whilst ornaments need to be played with rhythmic clarity. Aspiring composers may well be challenged to compose some variations as a composition study. You are always welcome to send a copy of your work to the PlentyMusic office for an opinion! This piece of music can competently played by an improver level student and is suited to being played by most instruments. The music editor also suggests listening to performances by singers who often approach the repeat with great freedom and further embellish the music. This is not necessarily to imitate but to learn about how to perform music. The advice to any young performer is to always have the confidence to make the piece your own. The accompanist also has the option of experimenting with the articulations particularly if the intention is to create the sound of pizzicato strings. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-08-12 10:37:37

The Happy Farmer arr. tuba & piano

A movement from Schumann’s “Album for the Young” Opus 68 (1848) which was composed at a very happy time in his life. This is a very uplifting movement with a tempo of 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute used in this arrangement for tuba accompanied by the piano. The solo part is appended to the piano score. There is a two bar click count in on the accompaniment track.

Added: 2019-08-04 14:36:16

The Happy Farmer arr. viola & piano

A movement from Schumann’s “Album for the Young” Opus 68 (1848) which was composed at a very happy time in his life. This is a very uplifting movement with a tempo of 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute used in this arrangement for viola accompanied by the piano. The solo part is appended to the piano score. There is a two bar click count in on the accompaniment track.

Added: 2019-08-04 14:28:48

The Happy Farmer arr. violoncello & piano

A movement from Schumann’s “Album for the Young” Opus 68 (1848) which was composed at a very happy time in his life. This is a very uplifting movement with a tempo of 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute used in this arrangement for violoncello accompanied by the piano. The solo part is also appended to the piano score. There is a two bar click count in on the accompaniment track.

Added: 2019-08-04 14:20:03

The Happy Farmer arr. alto saxophone & piano

A movement from Schumann’s “Album for the Young” Opus 68 (1848) which was composed at a very happy time in his life. This is a very uplifting movement with a tempo of 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute used in this arrangement for alto saxophone accompanied by the piano. The solo part is appended to the piano score. There is a two bar click introduction to the accompaniment.

Added: 2019-08-03 07:08:28

The Happy Farmer

A movement from Schumann’s “Album for the Young” Opus 68 (1848) for improver level piano. The piano collection which was composed at a very happy time in his life has many delightful pieces of music to discover. The edited music score has clearly specified fingering. This is an excellent piece for developing a singing legato line in the left hand. The realization plays at a tempo of 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. It is also the ideal movement for developing two important piano /keyboard techniques: i) slipping the thumb down from one note to another (bar 4 left hand) and also changing the finger on a note. Both techniques encourage good legato playing.

Added: 2019-08-02 12:21:12

The Happy Farmer arr. violin, acoustic guitar & string bass

A movement from Schumann’s “Album for the Young” Opus 68 (1848) which was composed at a very happy time in his life. This is a very uplifting movement with a tempo of 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute used in this arrangement for violin accompanied by acoustic guitar and string bass. There is a two bar click count in on the accompaniment track. A bass guitar can be used if available.

Added: 2019-08-02 12:00:35

The Happy Farmer arr. flute, acoustic guitar & string bass

A movement from Schumann’s “Album for the Young” Opus 68 (1848) which was composed at a very happy time in his life. This is a very uplifting with a tempo of 110 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute used in this arrangement for flute accompanied by acoustic guitar and upright or string bass. There is a two bar click count in on the accompaniment track. A bass guitar can be substituted for the string bass.

Added: 2019-08-02 11:44:46

The Last Rose of Summer arr. improver piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played as a concert piece. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many also melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Pianists need to aim for legato and singing tone and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes as they learn the piece.

Added: 2019-07-25 17:26:36

The Last Rose of Summer arr. flute & acoustic guitar + TAB

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A guitar accompaniment is also available for this score and for the guitarist there is a both a TAB and notated music score.

Added: 2019-07-25 16:44:33

The Last Rose of Summer arr. violin & acoustic guitar

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A guitar accompaniment is also available for this score.

Added: 2019-07-25 15:15:51

The Last Rose of Summer arr. mandolin & acoustic guitar

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A guitar accompaniment is also available for this score.

Added: 2019-07-25 14:52:35

The Last Rose of Summer arr. flute & acoustic guitar

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A guitar accompaniment is also available for this score.

Added: 2019-07-25 14:37:50

The Last Rose of Summer arr. tin whistle & acoustic guitar

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A guitar accompaniment is also available for this score.

Added: 2019-07-25 14:28:25

The Last Rose of Summer arr. violoncello & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A violoncello part is appended to the full score and a piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-25 08:02:28

The Last Rose of Summer arr. viola & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A viola part is appended to the full score and a piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-25 07:48:20

The Last Rose of Summer arr. violin & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A violin part is appended to the full score and a piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-25 07:43:17

The Last Rose of Summer arr. tenor horn & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A tenor horn part is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 16:22:40

The Last Rose of Summer arr. baritone & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A baritone horn part is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 16:09:06

The Last Rose of Summer arr. trombone & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A trombone part is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 14:56:30

The Last Rose of Summer arr. trumpet in Bb & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A trumpet in Bb part is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 14:52:55

The Last Rose of Summer arr. horn in F & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A horn in F (French horn) appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 14:08:36

The Last Rose of Summer arr. bassoon & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A bassoon part is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is also available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 10:59:32

The Last Rose of Summer arr. tenor saxophone & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. An tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-07-24 10:08:36

The Last Rose of Summer arr. alto saxophone & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 10:04:09

The Last Rose of Summer arr. soprano saxophone & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 07:34:35

The Last Rose of Summer arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 07:21:55

The Last Rose of Summer arr. English horn & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 07:11:45

The Last Rose of Summer arr. oboe & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. An oboe part is appended to the full score. A piano accompaniment is available for this arrangement.

Added: 2019-07-24 07:02:53

The Last Rose of Summer arr. flute & piano

This traditional Irish melody associated with the early 19th poem written by Thomas Moore is suited to being played by a solo instrument with an accompaniment as a concert item. The melody is quite evocative and needs to be played with sensitivity and an awareness of phrasing. There are many melodic variants as often is the case with folk music. Players need to aim for a beautiful legato and may wish to omit the small ornamental notes. There is the option of playing the repeat at the octave. A flute part is appended to the full score. A piano and also a guitar accompaniment are also available for this score.

Added: 2019-07-24 06:49:58

The Prophet Bird arr. violin & piano

This piece comes from Robert Schumann’s piano collection Waldscenen Opus 82 and dates from 1849. The title “Vogel als Prophet” translates as “Bird of Prophet” or “The Prophet Bird.” It is an impressive piece in ABA (ternary form) and has been arranged for violin and piano. The tempo indication in German is Langsam, sehr zart which translates as Slowly, very tenderly. The music has a haunting quality and offers challenges for both for the violinist and accompanist making it a very good test piece. The playback in the realisation is a little on the tense side and does not explore tempo rubato which at this time was an aspect of performance practice. Poise and control are needed in a performance whilst all the shapes need to be practiced for accuracy and shape. This is a music score that offers many challenges to players. The tempo in the realisation is 60 quarter note beats although there is opportunity to slow down at the end of phrases. The trill has been written out on an ossia stave in the sheet music score. The sustaining pedal has been indicated in the score but minimal use is suggested. This is a work that challenges the performers to make it their own in the sense that from the first note to the last both the players and the listeners must be captivated. It is a piece where it very easy for the music to be lost on the journey of a performance. It is important for players have a clear understanding of the rhythmic notation and intention - 3 thirty-second notes (demisemiquavers) are to be played in the time of one sixteenth note (or semiquaver). The music editor suggests that at the end of bar 18 the tempo is slowed and again at the end of bar 23 before the return to Tempo I at bar 25. This arrangement keeps as close to Schumann’s score copy as possible. A violin part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-04-26 08:28:53

The Prophet Bird arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

This piece comes from Robert Schumann’s piano collection Waldscenen Opus 82 and dates from 1849. The title “Vogel als Prophet” translates as “Bird of Prophet” or “The Prophet Bird.” It is an impressive piece in ABA (Ternary form) and has been arranged for clarinet in Bb and piano sounding in C minor. There are a few octave transpositions in the piano part. The tempo indication in German is Langsam, sehr zart which translates as Slowly, very tenderly. The music has a haunting quality and offers challenges for both for the clarinet player and accompanist making it a very good test piece. The playback in the realisation is a little on the tense side and does not explore tempo rubato which at this time was an aspect of performance practice. Poise and control are needed in a performance whilst all the shapes need to be practiced for accuracy and shape. This is a music score that offers many challenges to players. The tempo in the realisation is 60 quarter note beats although there is opportunity to slow down at the end of phrases. The trill has been written out on an ossia stave in the sheet music score. The sustaining pedal has been indicated in the score but minimal use is suggested. This is a work that challenges the performers to make it their own in the sense that from the first note to the last both the players and the listeners must be captivated. It is a piece where it very easy for the music to be lost on the journey of a performance. It is important for players have a clear understanding of the rhythmic notation and intention - 3 thirty-second notes (demisemiquavers) are to be played in the time of one sixteenth note (or semiquaver). The music editor suggests that at the end of bar 18 the tempo is slowed and again at the end of bar 23 before the return to Tempo I at bar 25. This arrangement keeps as close to Schumann’s score copy as possible. A clarinet in Bb part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-04-26 08:06:19

The Prophet Bird arr. flute & piano

This piece comes from Robert Schumann’s piano collection Waldscenen Opus 82 and dates from 1849. The title “Vogel als Prophet” translates as “Bird of Prophet” or “The Prophet Bird.” It is an impressive piece in ABA (Ternary form) and has been arranged for flute and piano. There are a few octave transpositions in the flute part simply needed to keep the melody within the instrument’s range. The tempo indication in German is Langsam, sehr zart which translates as Slowly, very tenderly. The music has a haunting quality and offers challenges for both for the flautist and accompanist making it a very good test piece. The playback in the realisation is a little on the tense side and does not explore tempo rubato which at this time was an aspect of performance practice. Poise and control are needed in a performance whilst all the shapes need to be practiced for accuracy and shape. This is a music score that offers many challenges to players. The tempo in the realisation is 60 quarter note beats although there is opportunity to slow down at the end of phrases. The trill has been written out on an ossia stave in the sheet music score. The sustaining pedal has been indicated in the score but minimal use is suggested. This is a work that challenges the performers to make it their own in the sense that from the first note to the last both the players and the listeners must be captivated. It is a piece where it very easy for the music to be lost on the journey of a performance. It is important for players have a clear understanding of the rhythmic notation and intention - 3 thirty-second notes (demisemiquavers) are to be played in the time of one sixteenth note (or semiquaver). The music editor suggests that at the end of bar 18 the tempo is slowed and again at the end of bar 23 before the return to Tempo I at bar 25. This arrangement keeps as close to Schumann’s score copy as possible. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-04-26 07:52:19

Sonata in G minor C.61 arr. flute and classical/acoustic guitar

Domenico Cimarosa 1749-1801 was an Italian composer who whilst a widely travelled musician belongs to the Neapolitan (Naples) school and he is remembered particularly for his operas. His keyboard music is played on both the piano and the harpsichord and several pieces in more recent times have been transcribed for the classical guitar. In this arrangement for flute and classical guitar of his Sonata in G minor C.61 marked Adagio ma non troppo the flute melody need to be played legato. Players need to have a keen awareness of the eighth note or quaver pulse whilst the realisation plays at 42 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. The repetitive element in the music is strong and the ornaments have been written out in this video score. There is the opportunity to linger at the end of phrases but any exaggeration of the music whether in respect to rhythm, dynamic and melody needs to be avoided.

Added: 2019-04-20 05:23:37

Keyboard Sonata in G Minor (C.61)

Domenico Cimarosa 1749-1801 was an Italian composer who whilst a widely travelled musician belongs to the Neapolitan (Naples) school and he is remembered particularly for his operas. His keyboard music is played on both the piano and the harpsichord and several pieces in more recent times have been transcribed for the classical guitar. The movement marked Adagio ma non troppo requires a legato touch while the realisation plays at a steady 42 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. The score has been prepared for performance on a piano and the ossia stave has an interpretation provided for the playing of the ornaments in bar 2 although there is option to modify these suggestions which possibly lack some rhythmic flexibility. The repeat of the ornaments in bar 15 should be played as in bar 2. Keyboard players need to have a keen awareness of the eighth note or quaver pulse when they are playing. The repetitive element in the music is strong whilst there is the opportunity to linger at the end of phrases but any exaggeration of the music whether in respect to rhythm, dynamic and melody needs to be avoided. The keyboard sonatas attributed to Cimarosa are short one movement works and any groupings of works in the same key found in recordings are editorial. They are works with appeal and consistent in their quality. The composer’s music is deserving of more attention and the keyboard sonatas are excellent performance pieces. A plain music score is appended to the edited music score.

Added: 2019-04-20 05:15:45

Pieds-en-l’air arr. baritone & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a duo to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A baritone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full music score although it is a tuba sound heard in the recording. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 14:21:54

Pieds-en-l’air arr. tenor horn & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a duo to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full music score although it is a tuba sound heard in the recording. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 14:15:11

Pieds-en-l’air arr. violin & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a duo to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realization is played at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A violin part is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 13:54:23

Pieds-en-l’air arr. violoncello & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a duo to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realization is played at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A violoncello part is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 13:45:17

Pieds-en-l’air arr. mandolin, acoustic guitar and string bass

This is an excellent ensemble piece although there are challenges for the guitar player. It is a challenging piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a trio to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realization is played at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 13:31:47

Pieds-en-l’air arr string group

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone and the arrangement is for violins divided into parts I and II viola and violoncellos. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a string group to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realization is played at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. Individual string parts are appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 12:59:07

Pieds-en-l’air arr saxophone ensemble

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone and this arrangement is for soprano, alto, tenor with possibly two instruments playing each line and baritone saxophone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a saxophone ensemble to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realization is played at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. Individual saxophone parts are appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 12:48:53

Pieds-en-l’air arr clarinet choir

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone and this arrangement is for clarinets divided into parts I, II and III (ideally two instruments or more on each line) and bass clarinet. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a clarinet group to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realization is played at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. Individual clarinet parts are appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 12:40:25

Pieds-en-l’air arr. trombone & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a duo to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A trombone part is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 09:28:44

Pieds-en-l’air arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a duo to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A horn in F (French horn) part is appended to the full music score and there is an alternative ending on the ossia stave. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 09:18:58

Pieds-en-l’air arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a duo to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A trumpet in Bb part is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 09:11:07

Pieds-en-l’air arr. bassoon & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For an ensemble to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A bassoon part is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 08:43:18

Pieds-en-l’air arr. tenor saxophone & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For an ensemble to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 08:28:04

Pieds-en-l’air arr. alto saxophone & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For an ensemble to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 08:05:51

Pieds-en-l’air arr. English horn & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For an ensemble to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 07:35:02

Pieds-en-l’air arr. oboe & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For an ensemble to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. An oboe part is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 07:24:14

Pieds-en-l’air arr. flute & piano

This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and instrument tone. It is also a good test piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For an ensemble to play this piece perfectly in tune is quite a challenge because it requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realisation is 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Rhythmically there are one or two moments that need attention particularly in the inner parts and the voice leading is at times quite challenging to follow. A flute part is appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-15 07:08:07

Pieds-en-l’air arr flute acoustic guitar and string bass

This is an excellent ensemble piece although there are particular challenges for the guitar player playing the inner lines. It is a challenging piece because a successful performance requires an awareness of the modal influence that exists in the lines of the music evident in the conflicting accidentals that feature in the score. For a trio to play this piece perfectly in tune requires the participants to be aware of each other’s part and rôle. The time signature is also a bit unusual but think of it as three groups of 3 whilst the tempo of the realization is played at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full music score. Peter Warlock’s career was sadly a short lived one but he did make some important contributions to the repertoire including the Capriol Suite from which this particular movement is taken. He was very interested in folk and Elizabethan music and used the name Warlock as a pseudonym for his composition work. He was a close friend of Delius and also worked as a music journalist using his real name which was Philip Heseltine. Warlock’s particular interest in music was in discovering and exploring the modal quality of English music through its folk song and its Elizabethan vocal music. The Capriol Suite captures what could be described as a neo-Elizabethan idiom and spirit quite perfectly and it is well worth listening to the whole work played in its orchestral arrangement. Warlock’s was in many ways an unfulfilled life but it is evident in both his instrumental and vocal music that he had a quite exceptional musical ear and a true understanding of English music.

Added: 2019-04-06 10:07:16

Evening in Transylvania arr. Horn in F (French horn) & piano

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village (Este a székelyeknél) is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces. It has been transposed down a tone from the original version. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bártok remains loyal to the classical principles of contrast in music by exploring two different ideas. Bártok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in all clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music it nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 132 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections. The realisation lacks a little rhythmic flexibility at the ends of phrases in the rubato sections and the music editor suggests that listening to a number of performances will be helpful in coming to an understanding of how this music should be performed. Accompanists will want to make use of the sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated through the entirety of the score although the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composers own time. Bártok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument as a composer and many of his folk music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and his accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Bártok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bártok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works. Rubato is defined as the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slowing down, usually without altering the overall pace. It is a playing approach particularly associated with the music of Chopin. A horn in F part (French horn) appropriately transposed is appended to the music score.

Added: 2019-03-29 12:41:51

Evening in Transylvania arr. viola & piano

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village (Este a székelyeknél) is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bártok remains loyal to the classical principles of contrast in music by exploring two different ideas. Bártok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in all clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music it nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 132 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections. The realisation lacks a little rhythmic flexibility at the ends of phrases in the rubato sections and the music editor suggests that listening to a number of performances will be helpful in coming to an understanding of how this music should be performed. Accompanists will want to make use of the sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated through the entirety of the score although the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composer’s own time. Bártok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument as a composer and many of his folk style music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and his accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Bártok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bártok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works. Rubato is defined as the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slowing down, usually without altering the overall pace. It is a playing approach particularly associated with the music of Chopin. A viola part is appended to the music score.

Added: 2019-03-29 12:34:53

Evening in Transylvania arr. violin & piano

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village (Este a székelyeknél) is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bártok remains loyal to the classical principles of contrast in music by exploring two different ideas. Bártok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in all clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music it nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 132 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections. The realisation lacks a little rhythmic flexibility at the ends of phrases in the rubato sections and the music editor suggests that listening to a number of performances will be helpful in coming to an understanding of how this music should be performed. Accompanists will want to make use of the sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated through the entirety of the score although the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composer’s own time. Bártok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument as a composer and many of his folk style music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and his accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Bártok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bártok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works. Rubato is defined as the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slowing down, usually without altering the overall pace. It is a playing approach particularly associated with the music of Chopin. A violin part is appended to the music score.

Added: 2019-03-29 12:27:48

Evening in Transylvania arr. baritone & piano

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village (Este a székelyeknél) is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces. It is a tone lower than the piano original and the Vivo sections have been transposed down an octave. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bártok remains loyal to the classical principles of contrast in music by exploring two different ideas. Bártok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in all clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music it nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 132 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections. The realisation lacks a little rhythmic flexibility at the ends of phrases and the music editor suggests that listening to a number of performances will be helpful in coming to an understanding of how this music should be performed. Accompanists will want to make use of the sustaining pedal but this has not been indicated through the entirety of the score although the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composers own time. Bártok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument as a composer and many of his folk music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and his accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Bártok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bártok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works. Rubato is defined as the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slowing down, usually without altering the overall pace. It is a playing approach particularly associated with the music of Chopin. A baritone part is appropriately transposed is appended to the music score.

Added: 2019-03-29 11:42:43

Evening in Transylvania arr. alto saxophone & piano

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village (Este a székelyeknél) is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bártok remains loyal to the classical principles of contrast in music by exploring two different ideas. Bártok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in all clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music it nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 132 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections.In the Vivo, non rubato sections the music has been transposed down an octave. The realisation lacks a little rhythmic flexibility at the ends of phrases and the music editor suggests that listening to a number of performances will be helpful in coming to an understanding of how this music should be performed. Accompanists will want to make use of the sustaining pedal but this has not been indicated through the entirety of the score although the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composers own time. Bártok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument as a composer and many of his folk music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and his accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Bártok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bártok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works. Rubato is defined as the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slowing down, usually without altering the overall pace. It is a playing approach particularly associated with the music of Chopin. An alto saxophone part is appropriately transposed is appended to the music score. The music editor is aware that the range of the piece is right at the top end of the register for the alto saxophone and would be very interested in receiving feedback about the arrangements practicality and suitability in performance. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the music score.

Added: 2019-03-29 11:34:18

Evening in Transylvania arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village (Este a székelyeknél) is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces although it has been transposed down a tone. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bártok remains loyal to the classical principles of contrast in music by exploring two different ideas. Bártok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in all clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music it nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 132 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections. The realisation lacks a little rhythmic flexibility at the ends of phrases in the rubato sections and the music editor suggests that listening to a number of performances will be helpful in coming to an understanding of how this music should be performed. Accompanists will want to make use of the sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated through the entirety of the score although the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composer’s own time. Bártok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument as a composer and many of his folk music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and his accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Bártok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bártok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works. Rubato is defined as the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slowing down, usually without altering the overall pace. It is a playing approach particularly associated with the music of Chopin. A clarinet on Bb appropriately transposed is appended to the music score.

Added: 2019-03-29 11:26:50

Evening in the Transylvania arr. flute & piano

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village (Este a székelyeknél) is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bártok remains loyal to the classical principles of contrast in music exploring two different ideas. Bártok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in both clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong and whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 144 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections. Accompanists will want to make use of the sustaining pedal but this has not been indicated in the score although the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composers own time. Bártok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument as a composer and many of his folk music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and his accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Bártok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bártok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works. Rubato is defined as the temporary disregarding of strict tempo to allow an expressive quickening or slowing down, usually without altering the overall pace. It is a playing approach particularly associated with the music of Chopin. A flute part is appended to the music score

Added: 2019-03-29 11:14:35

Evening in Transylvania

This piece known as Evening in Transylvania and also Evening in the Village is from the composer’s piano collection Ten Easy Pieces. There are two original melodies one played slowly with rubato and the other played quickly and in strict time. Essentially whilst working in the folk music idiom Bartok remains loyal to the principle of contrast in music exploring two different ideas. Bartok is always very precise about the articulations that he requires in his music and players need to take notice of the dynamics which are notated in both clefs. The rhythmic purpose of his music is always very strong and whilst delivery of the melody needs to be quite fluid in the rubato section the music nevertheless needs to be delivered with a strong sense of pulse. From bar 42 the music texturally is notated and conceived in four parts. In the realisation the tempo is 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats in the lento rubato sections and 132 quarter note (crotchet beats) beats in the Vivo, non rubato sections. Some pedalling has been indicated in the score but the music editor suggests minimal use as modern instruments are tonally much stronger that those of the composers own time. Bartok considered the piano to be a percussion instrument and as a composer many of his folk music arrangements explore the modal element that is so characteristic of folk music and accompaniments make use of ostinatos. Much of his piano music was composed for teaching purposes and collections such as For Children and Mikrokosmos are well worth exploring. Bartok is one of the greatest 20th century composers and made a significant contribution to the repertoire. As a composer he worked on small canvasses as well as large ones and frequently ideas were transferred from the small to the large. This particular piece was transcribed by the composer into the first of his Hungarian Sketches for orchestra. He was Hungarian by birth and was important collector of folk music and one of the founders of the relatively new subject of ethnomusicology. He has something in common with Schubert in that both of them were very creative towards the end of their lives. Bartok left Europe in 1940 to settle in the U.S.A. but his health declined and he died from leukaemia in 1945 sadly before many of his concert hall works had become well known and recognised as great works.

Added: 2019-03-25 11:32:53

Neapolitan Song arr. violin & acoustic guitar

This is an improver level arrangement for violin and acoustic guitar of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is based on the version found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album Opus 39 for piano that dates from 1878. The tempo of the first section Andantino in the realisation is 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and for the Vivace section the tempo is 120 quarter note beats to the minute. The voicing of the chord shapes for the acoustic guitar have been edited.

Added: 2019-03-18 13:51:31

Neapolitan Song Piano Solo

This charming and tuneful piece is from Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album Opus 39 which dates from 1878. The first section is played at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the faster section at 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The melodic line needs to clearly articulated and the accompaniment played with a lightness and bounce. The melody also features in Act 3 of the composer’s ballet Swan Lake.

Added: 2019-03-18 13:38:10

Neapolitan Song arr. mandolin & acoustic guitar

This is an improver level arrangement for mandolin and acoustic guitar of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is based on the version found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album Opus 39 for piano that dates from 1878. The tempo of the first section Andantino in the realisation is 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and for the Vivace section the tempo is 120 quarter note beats to the minute. The voicing of the chord shapes for the acoustic guitar have been edited. There is an alternative ending provided for the mandolin player.

Added: 2019-03-18 13:18:06

Neapolitan Song arr. two acoustic guitars

This is an improver level arrangement for two acoustic guitars of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is based on the version found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album Opus 39 for piano that dates from 1878. The tempo of the first section Andantino in the realisation is 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and for the Vivace section the tempo is 120 quarter note beats to the minute. The voicing of the chord shapes for the acoustic guitar have been edited. There is an alternative ending provided for Acoustic Guitar 1.

Added: 2019-03-18 13:15:27

Neapolitan Song arr. flute & acoustic guitar

This is an improver level arrangement for flute and guitar of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is based on the version found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album Opus 39 for piano that dates from 1878. The tempo of the first section Andantino in the realisation is 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and for the Vivace section the tempo is 120 quarter note beats to the minutes. The voicing of the chord shapes for the acoustic guitar have been edited. For flute players who need an additional challenge there is an intermediate arrangement for the instrument with a piano accompaniment.

Added: 2019-03-17 16:54:45

Neapolitan Song arr. soprano saxophone & piano

This is an arrangement for soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realization is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the soprano saxophone part is only sounded on the repeat and some performers also cut out 4 beats in the link between bars 10 and 11. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A soprano saxophone part is appended to the full music score in the pdf download.

Added: 2019-03-17 15:22:16

Neapolitan Song arr. tenor saxophone & piano

This is an arrangement for tenor saxophone with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realization is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the tenor saxophone part is only sounded on the repeat and some performers cut out 4 beats in the link between bars 10 and 11. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A tenor saxophone part is appended to the full music score in the pdf download.

Added: 2019-03-17 08:45:25

Neapolitan Song arr. alto saxophone & piano

This is an arrangement for alto saxophone with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realization is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the alto saxophone part is only sounded on the repeat and some performers cut out 4 beats in the link between bars 10 and 11. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. An alto saxophone part is appended to the full music score in the pdf download.

Added: 2019-03-17 08:33:40

Neapolitan Song arr. tenor horn & piano

This is an arrangement for tenor horn with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realisation is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the tenor horn part is only sounded on the repeat and some performers cut out 4 beats in the link between bars 9 and 10. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A tenor horn part is appended to the full music score in the pdf download.

Added: 2019-03-16 14:20:39

Neapolitan Song arr. flute & piano

This is an arrangement for flute with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realisation is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. There is the option of playing the repeat an octave higher than written and the first note of the flute part is only sounded on the repeat. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A flute part is appended to the full music score in the pdf download.

Added: 2019-03-16 14:08:11

Neapolitan Song arr. bassoon & piano

This is an arrangement for bassoon with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realisation is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the bassoon part is only sounded on the repeat. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A bassoon part is appended to the full music score in the pdf download.

Added: 2019-03-16 14:03:19

Neapolitan Song arr. trombone & piano

This is an arrangement for trombone with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realization is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the trombone part is only sounded on the repeat. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A trombone part is appended to the full music score in the pdf download.

Added: 2019-03-16 13:45:39

Neapolitan Song arr. tuba & piano

This is an arrangement for tuba with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realization is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the tuba part is only sounded on the repeat and some performers cut out 4 beats in the link between bars 9 and 10. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A tuba part is appended to the full music score in the pdf downloaded a piano accompaniment is also available.

Added: 2019-03-16 13:31:44

Neapolitan Song arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

This is an arrangement for trumpet in Bb with piano accompaniment of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat whilst the piano accompaniment includes of some of the orchestral music countermelodies from Swan Lake. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realization is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the trumpet part is only sounded on the repeat and some performers cut out 4 beats in the link between bars 9 and 10. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the soloist and well rehearsed with the accompanist. The accompanist may wish to edit the playing of the introduction by omitting the left hand chords and playing the octave lead in with separate hands or even more simply by starting at bar 5. A trumpet part is appended to the full music score and a piano accompaniment is available to download.

Added: 2019-03-15 11:22:56

Neapolitan Song arr. brass quintet

This is an arrangement for brass quintet comprising two trumpets in Bb, horn in F (French horn), trombone and tuba of Tchaikovsky’s Neapolitan Dance also familiar as a theme from one of the dances in Act III of Swan Lake. The musical material is very similar to that found in Tchaikovsky’s Children’s Album although the music has been arranged in 4/4 time and has a repeat. The tempo of the first section Allegro moderato in the realization is at 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minutes and for the Molto piu mosso section the tempo is 110 quarter note beats to the minutes. Often performers choose a slower tempo for the slower section and a faster one for the faster section. The first note of the trumpet part is only sounded on the repeat. In the repeat there is additional instruction to accelerate towards the end of the movement but the music editor advises against this until the piece is known thoroughly by the players and has been well rehearsed. Individual parts for each of the instruments are appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-03-15 10:56:27

Sonata in D for Keyboard/Piano

The Sonata in D by Mateo Albéniz is a binary form (AB) work that is essentially in 6/8 but explores the characteristic 3/4 v 6/8 rhythmic shapes of Spanish music. Often these are explored in adjoining bars and sometimes even in the same bar. It is music of joy and energy more baroque than classical as one would expect from a composer working at a distance from the main centres of European music. As a piano piece it does have something of the lightness of a Mozart movement but coloured with reference to the phyrgian mode that help give the music its Spanish character. The music editor prefers a consistent approach to the playing of the ornaments which have been written out in full in the score and a lightness of touch is essential if rhythmic accuracy is to be communicated. The realisation plays at a tempo of 124 dotted quarter (crotchet) notes to the minute and the repeats are played. Some score detail in respect to phrasing has been indicated in the edited music score whilst a plain score is also attached enabling to add score details as they wish. There are one or two alternative options indicated by the ossia staves and they are in place essentially to draw awareness to inconsistencies that exist in the score. In addition, the music editor could suggest that bars 9 and 13 be mirrored in the closing section at bar 85 and 90 although pianists play the music as notated in the score. Sometimes the left hand is required to play notes that have been notated in the treble clef. Keyboard players who do their listening research will discover that there are options as far as adding additional ornaments in their performances which is perfectly permissible in the repeat sections. Again as in most music of this time it is difficult to find two performers approaching the playing of ornaments in the same way. There are versions of this music for classical guitar and also harp.

Added: 2019-03-03 18:05:28

Sururú na Cidade arr. 2 marimba & string/upright bass

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chôrinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. In this arrangement for flute, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass individual parts are appended to the full score. There are particularly instruments associated with the performance of this style of music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar originally from Portugal with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may play either a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. In this arrangement for two marimba players and upright/string bass individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-21 08:36:45

Sururú na Cidade arr. flute, acoustic guitar & string/upright bass

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chôrinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. In this arrangement for flute, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass individual parts are appended to the full score. There are particularly instruments associated with the performance of this style of music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar originally from Portugal with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may play either a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. In this arrangement for flute, acoustic guitar and upright/string bass individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. The acoustic guitar part plays a combination of countermelodies and chords.

Added: 2019-02-21 08:34:15

Sururú na Cidade arr. mandolin, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chôrinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. In this arrangement for mandolin, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass individual parts are appended to the full score. There are particularly instruments associated with the performance of this style of music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar originally from Portugal with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may play either a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. In this arrangement for mandolin, acoustic guitar and upright/string bass individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. The acoustic guitar part plays a combination of countermelodies and chords.

Added: 2019-02-21 08:31:09

Sururú na Cidade arr. marimba, acoustic guitar & string/upright bass

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chôrinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. In this arrangement for mandolin, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass individual parts are appended to the full score. There are particularly instruments associated with the performance of this style of music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar originally from Portugal with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may play either a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. In this arrangement for marimba, acoustic guitar and upright/string bass individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. The acoustic guitar part plays a combination of countermelodies and chords.

Added: 2019-02-21 08:16:45

Sururú na Cidade arr. two acoustic guitars with TAB and string/upright bass

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. In this arrangement for two acoustic guitars and upright/string bass individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score with the guitar parts notated conventionally and with TAB. The acoustic guitar 2 part plays a combination of countermelodies and chords.

Added: 2019-02-21 08:13:03

Sururú na Cidade arr. two acoustic guitars and string/upright bass

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. In this arrangement for two acoustic guitars and upright/string bass individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. The acoustic guitar 2 part plays a combination of countermelodies and chords.

Added: 2019-02-21 08:04:15

Sururú na Cidade arr. violin, acoustic guitar & string/upright bass

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century Rio de Janeiro (Chôrinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. In this arrangement for mandolin, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass individual parts are appended to the full score. There are particularly instruments associated with the performance of this style of music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar originally from Portugal with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may play either a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. In this arrangement for violin, acoustic guitar and upright/string bass individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. The acoustic guitar part plays a combination of countermelodies and chords.

Added: 2019-02-20 17:28:12

Sururú na Cidade arr. marimba with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. A marimba part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-20 16:43:22

Sururú na Cidade arr. violoncello with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chôrinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this style of music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar originally from Portugal with 4 strings known as the cavaquino or Portuguese ukulele which may play either a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. Some performers play the repeat of the C section at the octave as indicated in the score but this is optional.

Added: 2019-02-20 15:55:24

Sururú na Cidade arr. violin with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A and understood to be in rondo form. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece of music. A violin part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-20 13:17:52

Sururú na Cidade arr. bassoon with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. A bassoon part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-19 19:07:03

Sururú na Cidade arr. soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. Some performers play the repeat of the C section at the octave as indicated in the score but this is optional. An soprano saxophone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-19 18:42:12

Sururú na Cidade arr. tenor saxophone with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. A tenor saxophone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-19 18:36:05

Sururú na Cidade arr. alto saxophone with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. Some performers play the repeat of the C section at the octave as indicated in the score but this is optional. An alto saxophone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-19 15:03:49

Sururú na Cidade arr. oboe with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. An oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-19 15:00:21

Sururú na Cidade arr. flute with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. Some performers play the repeat of the C section at the octave as indicated in the score but this is optional. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-19 10:05:51

Sururú na Cidade arr. clarinet in B Flat with piano accompaniment

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in 19th century urban Rio de Janeiro (Chorinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may have either play a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. From bar 38 there is the option of playing the repeat of the C section at the octave as indicated in the score. A clarinet part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-02-18 10:53:10

Keyboard Sonata in A Minor (C.55)

Domenico Cimarosa 1749-1801 was an Italian composer who whilst a widely travelled musician belongs to the Neapolitan (Naples) school and he is remembered particularly for his operas. His keyboard music was played on both the piano and the harpsichord and several pieces have been transcribed for the classical guitar. This short movement requires a legato touch and the realisation plays at 42 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. The ornaments are played quickly and start on the beat and whilst not indicated in the score some limited use of the sustaining pedal is suggested. From the performance point of view the rhythmic shape of the left hand part needs to be constant. The Siciliana rhythmic shape is best described as a slow lilting pattern in 6/8 or 12/8 time and has proved a popular template since baroque times. It can described as a slow jig. Cimarosa’s keyboard music is well worth investigating although his work still needs to be authenticated. The keyboard sonatas attributed to Cimarosa are short one movement works and any groupings of works in the same key found in recordings are editorial. They are works with appeal and consistent in their quality. There is some suggested fingering on the edited music score whilst a plain score is also appended.

Added: 2019-02-10 16:56:40

Sururú na Cidade arr. solo piano

Zequinha Abreu was a Brazilian musician and composer and Sururú na Cidade translates as Sururú in the City. The rondo form of Sururú na Cidade can be summarised as Intro A B B A C C A. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are played. The music of Brazil is a fascinating mix of European and African cultures with the Choro or Lament instrumental style having its origins in C19th Rio de Janeiro (Chôrinho = Little Lament). Whilst the inference of the title suggests a style that is sad, pieces can often have a fast and happy rhythms with syncopation, modulations and counterpoint. There are also particularly instruments associated with the performance of this music namely the flute, guitar and a small type of guitar originally from Portugal with 4 strings known as the cavaquino which may play either a melody or a chord rhythm. From the sheet music point of view this is a very concisely notated piece. Some performers play the repeat of the C section at the octave as indicated in the score but this is optional.

Added: 2019-02-04 15:24:31

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. bassoon with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of F and plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A bassoon part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 19:15:28

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. tenor saxophone with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of Eb and plays at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 19:13:13

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. alto saxophone with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of Eb and plays at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 19:09:49

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of F and plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 17:32:21

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. English horn with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 17:26:03

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. oboe with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847 who had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst the realisation sounds in the key of F and plays at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. An oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 17:12:11

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. flute with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847 who had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb and the realisation sounds in the key of G and plays at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. An individual flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 16:38:46

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. tuba with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation also sounds in the key of Eb and plays at a tempo of 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A tuba part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 16:12:47

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. trombone with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation also sounds in the key of Eb and plays at a tempo of 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 16:10:29

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. horn in F (French horn) with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation also sounds in the key of Eb and plays at a tempo of 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A horn in F (French horn) part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 16:08:33

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. trumpet in Bb with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation also sounds in the key of Eb and plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 16:04:14

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. violoncello with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A violoncello part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 15:51:36

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. violin with piano accompaniment

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A violin part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-27 15:39:30

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More)

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst the realisation plays at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A piano version in the key of F is is appended to the Eb score to encourage playing in a range of keys.

Added: 2019-01-27 15:36:07

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. mandolin, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass

This is an arrangement for mandolin, acoustic guitars and upright or string bass with the score formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts for the three instruments appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly in this sunny piece.

Added: 2019-01-27 14:59:47

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. two acoustic guitars and string/upright bass

This is an arrangement for two acoustic guitars and string or upright bass with the score formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts for the three instruments appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly in this sunny piece.

Added: 2019-01-27 14:06:22

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. brass quartet

In this arrangement for clarinet quartet the specified instruments are three clarinets in Bb and a bass clarinet. The score is formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts appropriately transposed for the four clarinets appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D it plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape also features strongly.

Added: 2019-01-27 08:03:52

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. clarinet quartet

In this arrangement for clarinet quartet the specified instruments are three clarinets in Bb and a bass clarinet. The score is formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts appropriately transposed for the four clarinets appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D it plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape also features strongly.

Added: 2019-01-27 08:01:51

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. string quartet

In this arrangement for string quartet the specified instruments are 2 violins, viola, tenor and violoncello. The score is formatted as a one document pdf file with Individual parts for the four string instruments appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D it plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape also features strongly.

Added: 2019-01-27 07:56:06

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. pitched percussion

In this arrangement conceived for 4 marimba players with two instruments available. Marimba parts 1 and 2 are scored in the treble clef and parts 3 and 4 in the bass clef. The score is formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts for the marimba players appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D it plays at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape also features strongly.

Added: 2019-01-27 07:52:28

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. marimba, acoustic guitar & string/upright bass

This is an arrangement for marimba, acoustic guitar and upright often described as string bass with the score formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts for the three instruments appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly in what is a sunny piece.

Added: 2019-01-26 16:00:36

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of Eb and plays at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2019-01-26 14:21:03

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. three acoustic guitars

This is an arrangement for three acoustic guitars with the score formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts for the three acoustic guitars appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly in this sunny piece.

Added: 2019-01-26 14:05:59

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. saxophone quartet

In this arrangement for saxophone quartet the specified instruments are soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophones. The score is formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts for the four saxophones appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb which is the sounding key of this realisation playing at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape also features strongly in this sunny piece.

Added: 2019-01-26 13:41:02

No Bailes Más! (Dance No More) arr. three acoustic guitars + TAB

This is an arrangement for three acoustic guitars with the score formatted as a one document pdf file with individual parts for the three acoustic guitars with TAB appended to the full score. Ignacio Cervantes was a Cuban composer born in the capital city of Havana in 1847. He had piano lessons with Louis Moreau Gottschalk before travelling to Paris to further his music studies with Charles Valentin Alkan amongst others. This piece originates as a piano solo in the key of Eb whilst this realisation sounds in the key of D and plays back at a tempo of 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many performers play through the piece twice although no repeat signs are indicated in the score. Much of Cervantes piano music is well suited to being played by a variety of instrument combinations as they are well crafted and have great musical appeal. The habanera rhythmic shape features strongly in this sunny piece.

Added: 2019-01-26 13:06:02

Scherzino Mexicano

One of the jewels of music originating as a guitar solo and composed in 1909 by the Mexican composer Manuel Ponce. This is simply beautiful music exploring the three in a bar, two in a bar rhythmic pattern so characteristicic of Spanish and South American music. Whilst the melody is predominantly diatonic the harmony is chromatic particularly at the start of the second section. The melodic line does need to predominate particularly in the chromatic section from bar 10. There are some ambiguities in the score in respect to tied notes although the music editor has been guided by the guitar copy of the score. The tempo of the realisation is 110 dotted quarter notes (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst there is opportunity for the tempo to ebb and flow as if the performance is being sung.

Added: 2019-01-18 16:39:40

Off To California arr. flute & acoustic guitar

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as dance sets. In this two part arrangement for flute and acoustic guitar, the flute plays the melody and the guitarist accompanies with chords. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed as such by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three guitar accompaniments are available, with repeats, playing chords at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 20:52:31

Off To California arr. tin whistle in G & acoustic guitar

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. In this two part arrangement for tin whistle in G and acoustic guitar, the tin whistle plays the melody and the guitarist accompanies with chords. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three guitar accompaniments are available, with repeats, playing chords at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 20:23:11

Off To California arr. tenor recorder & acoustic guitar

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. In this two part arrangement for tenor recorder and acoustic guitar, the recorder plays the melody and the guitarist accompanies with chords. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three guitar accompaniments are available, with repeats, playing chords at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 19:38:24

Off To California arr. mandolin & acoustic guitar

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. In this two part arrangement for mandolin and acoustic guitar conventionally notated players should try and develop their memory and ensemble playing. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the acoustic guitar playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 19:09:11

Off To California arr. mandolin & acoustic guitar + TAB

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. In this two part arrangement for mandolin and acoustic guitar with TAB players should try and play from memory and develop their ensemble playing. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three guitar accompaniments are available, with repeats, playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 19:03:08

Off To California arr. two acoustic guitars

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. In this two part arrangement for two acoustic guitars performers should try and play from memory and develop their ensemble playing. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the acoustic guitar playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 11:12:06

Off To California arr. two acoustic guitars with TAB

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. In this two part arrangement for two acoustic guitars with TAB players should try and play from memory and develop their ensemble playing. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the second acoustic guitar playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 11:03:10

Off To California arr. electric and bass guitar

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. This arrangement is notated conventionally and players will move on to possibly explore the folk rock style in their ensemble playing. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. The score is presented with minimal score detail as is usually the case with folk music. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the bass guitar playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 09:34:52

Off To California arr. electric and bass guitar + TAB

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. This arrangement includes both conventional notation and TAB and players can possibly explore the folk rock style in their ensemble playing. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. The score is presented with minimal score detail as is usually the case with folk music. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the bass guitar playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 09:30:40

Off To California arr. banjo & upright bass

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to keep personnel fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Much folk music is played from memory and this and ensemble playing should be encouraged. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line. The score is presented with minimal score detail as is usually the case with folk music. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst very relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the upright bass playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-18 08:46:39

Off To California arr. clarinet in B Flat & bass clarinet in B Flat

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to both encourage fitness. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Most folk music is played from memory and both memory and ensemble playing should be encouraged when performing this style of music. In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb and bass clarinet in Bb the realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line in this two part version. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail as is the case with this score. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition being represented and sometimes both geography and even locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the bass clarinet playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-17 19:46:23

Off To California arr. oboe & bassoon

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to encourage fitness. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Most folk music is played from memory and both memory and ensemble playing should be encouraged when performing music in this style. In this arrangement for oboe and bassoon the realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played and there is also no ornamentation of the melodic line in this two part version. Understand that folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. The playing of ornaments whilst relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition being represented and sometimes geography even locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the bassoon playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-17 18:41:17

Off To California arr. pitched percussion

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to encourage fitness. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Most folk music is played from memory and both memory and ensemble playing should be encouraged in any performance situation. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line in this two part version. The playback sounds are of a marimba but there may be other instrument options available to the percussionists to try. Understand that folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail. The playing of ornaments whilst relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition being represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the violoncello playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-17 18:26:22

Off To California arr. violin & violoncello

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to keep them fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Most folk music is played from memory and both memory and ensemble playing should be encouraged. The realisation plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line in this two part version. The violinist may want to play the repeats at the octave and the playback sound of the violoncello is a pizzicato sound which the player can of course change especially if repeats are played. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail as is the case in this score. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition being represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music. Three accompaniments are available, with repeats, with the violoncello playing the bass line at tempi of (1) 110 (2) 120 and (3) 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is two bar click track introduction before the music starts to play.

Added: 2018-12-17 18:01:30

Off To California arr. piano solo in G (Two Part + Letter Names)

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to keep them fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Most folk music is played from memory and both memory and ensemble playing should be encouraged. The realisation of this two part version with letter names in the note heads plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line in this version which has vamped chords to accompany the melody. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail although this score has both letter names of the notes in the notepad and suggested finger to encourage the beginner player to make rapid progress. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition being represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music.

Added: 2018-12-17 10:07:12

Off To California arr. piano solo in G (Vamped Chords)

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to keep them fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Most folk music is played from memory and both memory and ensemble playing should be encouraged. The realisation of this version with vamped chords as the accompaniment plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet feel as demonstrated in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line in this version which has vamped chords to accompany the melody. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail although there is some suggested fingering for the player. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition being represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music.

Added: 2018-12-17 09:58:38

Off To California arr. piano solo in G (Two Part)

The hornpipe is found in the folk music of England, Scotland and Ireland and has a traditional association with sailors in that dancing was used on long sea journeys to keep them fit. Hornpipes are usually associated with other hornpipes in a performance context in what is described as a dance set. Most folk music is played from memory and both memory and ensemble playing should be encouraged. The realisation of this two part plays at 132 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and the hornpipe is in AB (Binary) form. The music needs to be played with a triplet fee as heard in the realisation. The repeats are not played in the realisation and there is no ornamentation of the melodic line in this two part version. Folk music scores are generally presented with minimal score detail although in this score there is some suggested fingering. Understand that the playing of ornaments whilst relevant in repetitive music of this kind requires a special study and is governed by the instrument being played, the music tradition being represented and sometimes geography/locality. A study of ornamentation in folk music the music editor suggests is not for the faint-hearted! There are also examples of hornpipes in baroque music including Handel’s Water Music.

Added: 2018-12-17 09:43:52

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. violoncello & acoustic guitar

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for violoncello and acoustic guitar is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player.

Added: 2018-12-10 19:30:04

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. violin & acoustic guitar

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for violin and acoustic guitar is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. The violin player has the option of playing the repeat of the chorus at the octave.

Added: 2018-12-10 19:15:31

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. oboe & acoustic guitar

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for oboe and acoustic guitar is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player.

Added: 2018-12-10 19:10:08

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. flute & acoustic guitar

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for flute and acoustic guitar is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. The flute player has the option of playing the repeat of the chorus at the octave.

Added: 2018-12-10 18:43:38

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. violoncello & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style & at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for violoncello and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played & performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A violoncello part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-06 11:57:46

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. violin & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style & at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for violoncello and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played & performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A violinpart is appended to the full score whilst the player has the option of performing the repeat of the chorus at the octave.

Added: 2018-12-06 11:55:30

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. brass quartet

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for brass quartet of trumpet, horn in f, trombone & euphonium or tuba is in common time while some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a more contemporary style. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. This arrangement explores a gentle rock style whilst the realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar. The full score includes a piano short score and individual parts for the 4 brass instruments are appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 21:46:39

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. clarinet choir

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for clarinet choir of 3 clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet is in common time although some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a more contemporary style. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. This arrangement explores a gentle rock style whilst the realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar. The full score includes a piano short score and individual parts for the three clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet are appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 21:40:10

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. piano solo in G

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style & it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement solo piano in G is in common time although some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a more contemporary style. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. This arrangement explores a gentle rock style whilst the realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar.

Added: 2018-12-05 21:35:16

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. piano solo in F

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style & it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for solo piano or keyboard in F is in common time although some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a more contemporary style. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. This arrangement explores a gentle rock style whilst the realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar.

Added: 2018-12-05 21:25:14

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for trumpet in Bb and piano sounding in the key of Eb is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A trumpet in Bb appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 21:19:42

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. euphonium & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for euphonium and piano sounding in Eb is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a more contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A euphonium part notated in the bass clef is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 21:13:24

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. baritone horn & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for baritone horn and piano sounding in Eb is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a more contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if is an possible to recruit a percussion player. A baritone horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 19:51:29

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. trombone & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for trombone and piano in the key of F is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 19:06:02

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. tenor horn & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for tenor and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 18:18:53

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for trumpet in Bb and piano sounding in the key of F is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A trumpet in Bb appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 18:10:08

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for horn in F (French horn) and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A horn in F part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 18:07:02

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. bassoon & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style & at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for bassoon and piano sounding in the key of G is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played & performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A bassoon part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 17:31:28

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. tenor saxophone & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for tenor saxophone and piano sounding in the key of F is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 17:21:17

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. alto saxophone & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for alto saxophone and piano sounding in the key of F is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 11:44:47

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. soprano saxophone & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for soprano saxophone and piano sounding in the key of F is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 11:30:24

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. bass clarinet & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for bass clarinet and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A bass clarinet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The sounding key is F.

Added: 2018-12-05 11:24:21

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. clarinet in B flat & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for clarinet in Bb and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The sounding key is F.

Added: 2018-12-05 11:05:19

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. oboe & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for oboe and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. An oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-12-05 11:01:40

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. flute & piano

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style and at times it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement for flute and piano is in common time whilst some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a contemporary rock style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played and performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation. As players become familiar with the content and chordal structure there is opportunity to develop the melodic material through improvisation in an additional repeat especially if it is possible to recruit a percussion player. A flute part is appended to the full score. Playing the second chorus at the octave is also an option

Added: 2018-12-05 10:04:38

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot arr. saxophone quartet

This is a very popular piece of music that in many respects transcends idiom, style & it could be suggested culture. This improver level arrangement is in common time while some of the accompanying chords and rhythmic shapes have been updated to give a more contemporary style. There are so many interpretations that it is almost impossible to decide how it should be sung, played & performed. This familiar spiritual gained popularity during the 1960’s with the Civil Rights movement and since 1988 it has become associated with the English rugby team. This arrangement explores a gentle rock style whilst the realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the bar. The full score includes a piano short score and individual parts for soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophone are appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-26 19:57:45

Pavane (Full Version) arr. flute & piano

This is a full version of the Pavan for flute with piano accompaniment based on the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 15:11:21

Pavane (Full Version) Opus 50

This is a piano arrangement based on the piano and SATB vocal arrangement of the complete version by the composer. The layout is intended to clarify the voicing of the music. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the E# beginning and ending with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. One of the playing challenges is that the same note can be sounded in a different part. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. This is an excellent piece for exploring the tonal range of the piano but avoid playing the quieter sections too loudly.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:56:17

Pavane arr. violoncello & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for violoncello with piano accompaniment is based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. A violoncello part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:45:29

Pavan arr. trombone & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for trombone with piano accompaniment is based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer in the key of F minor. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. A trombone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:35:32

Pavane arr. soprano saxophone & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer transcribed to the key of F minor. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. An soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:32:22

Pavane arr. oboe & piano

This is a full version of the Pavan for oboe with piano accompaniment based on the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer sounding in the original key of F# minor. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. An oboe part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:27:22

Pavane arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for clarinet in B flat sounding in the key of F minor with piano accompaniment is based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the E# beginning and ending with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. This is an excellent piece for exploring the tonal range of the piano but avoid playing the quieter sections too loudly. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. A clarinet in B flat part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:21:08

Pavane arr. clarinet in A & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for clarinet in A with piano accompaniment is based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer in the original key of F# minor. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the E# beginning and ending with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. This is an excellent piece for exploring the tonal range of the piano but avoid playing the quieter sections too loudly. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. A clarinet in A part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:10:25

Pavane arr. bassoon & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for bassoon with piano accompaniment is based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer in the original key of F# minor. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. A bassoon part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:05:25

Pavane arr. alto saxophone & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for alto saxophone with piano accompaniment based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The sounding key is F minor.

Added: 2018-11-20 14:00:22

Pavane arr. flute & piano

This is intermediate level arrangement for flute with piano accompaniment is based on a cut down version of the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer in the original key of F# minor. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the note & begins and ends with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests that the pianist makes limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. The arrangement lasts for approximately 3 minutes and is therefore ideally suited as a concert item. A flute part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-20 13:43:16

Skye Boat Song arr. baritone horn & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instruments. This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The players have the option of playing the repeat whilst a baritone horn part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-08 11:59:21

Skye Boat Song arr. trombone & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement for trombone and piano is in 6/8 time whilst the realisation plays at 48 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The repeat is optional whilst a trombone part is attached to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-08 11:49:12

Skye Boat Song arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel The repeat is optional and a trumpet in B flat part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-08 11:46:10

Skye Boat Song arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time. This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The repeat is optional and a horn in F (French horn) part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-08 11:39:39

Skye Boat Song arr. tenor horn & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instruments. This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The tenor player has the option of playing the repeat whilst a tenor horn part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-08 11:32:15

Skye Boat Song arr. pitched percussion (marimba) & guitar

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The marimba player has the option of playing the repeat chorus at the octave. There is also supporting TAB for the guitar player. There are three guitar accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-07 13:08:06

Santa Lucia arr. viola & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time. This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The repeat is optional whilst a viola part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-11-07 13:03:27

Skye Boat Song arr. violin & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time. This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The violinist has the option of playing the repeat of the chorus an octave higher. The repeat does not sound in the realisation whilst a violin part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-07 12:43:15

Skye Boat Song arr. violoncello & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time. This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. The repeat is optional whilst a violoncello part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-07 12:15:59

Skye Boat Song arr. flute & acoustic guitar

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. There is supporting TAB for the guitar player. There are three accompaniments featuring an acoustic guitar playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 15:51:59

Skye Boat Song arr. solo piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations This arrangement keeps the melody as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. There is no introduction in order to keep the phrase structure balanced.

Added: 2018-11-06 15:39:37

Skye Boat Song arr. flute & two acoustic guitars

In this arrangement for flute accompanied by two acoustic guitars, one guitar plays chords with standard guitar tuning whilst the other has its sixth string tuned to D, (usually described as dropped down D tuning) and plays a patterned accompaniment. This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time. In this arrangement the accompanying chords have been updated to make the setting more contemporary. There is no introduction in order to keep the phrase structure balanced. There are three accompaniments featuring two acoustic guitars playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 15:27:57

Skye Boat Song arr. tenor saxophone & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations. In this arrangement the accompanying chords have been updated to make the setting more contemporary. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 14:43:53

Skye Boat Song arr. alto saxophone & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations. In this arrangement the accompanying chords have been updated to make the setting more contemporary. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 14:38:53

Skye Boat Song arr. bass clarinet & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations This arrangement keeps the melody as usually as it usually sung but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. A bass clarinet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 14:36:48

Skye Boat Song arr. bassoon & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst the song’s text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles it is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations This arrangement keeps the melody as usually but some of the accompanying chords have been updated to give a more contemporary feel. A bassoon part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 14:34:28

Skye Boat Song arr. soprano saxophone & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations. In this arrangement the accompanying chords have been updated to make the setting more contemporary. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 12:35:14

Skye Boat Song arr. clarinet in B flat & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations. In this arrangement the accompanying chords have been updated to make the setting more contemporary. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 12:20:24

Skye Boat Song arr. oboe & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations. In this arrangement the accompanying chords have been updated to make the setting more contemporary. An oboe part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 12:15:38

Skye Boat Song arr. flute & piano

This familiar Scottish folk song begins and ends with a chorus (chorus-verse-chorus) and whilst its text describes the escape of Bonnie Prince Charles the song is often sung as a lullaby. This improver level arrangement is in 6/8 time and is suited to being played by a number of instrument combinations. In this arrangement the accompanying chords have been updated to make the setting more contemporary. The flautist has the option of playing the repeated chorus an octave higher as in the realisation. A flute part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available playing at (1) 48 (2) 50 (3) 52 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-11-06 12:01:24

Pavane arr. Intermediate Level Piano

This is an intermediate level piano arrangement based on the piano and SATB vocal arrangement by the composer. The layout is intended to clarify the voicing of the music. The elements of the piece are a distinctive melody, combined with an accompaniment that is for much of the time figurative in character, the occasional countermelody and bass line. Fauré composed music that references both modal and harmonic scales and this explains the feature known as “false relation” (conflicting accidentals in different voices) which appear in bar 22 and 23 and several other bars. It is music that needs to be played with clarity and dignity and not too quickly. The realisation plays back at 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. If the movement is played too quickly it loses its poise and gracefulness. The music exists in many different arrangements but is probably most familiar in its orchestral version although it started off life as a piano piece in the 1880’s. The trill in the realisation begins on the E# beginning and ending with sixteenth notes as shown in the video score on YouTube although trills are open to being interpreted in different ways. One of the playing challenges is that the same note can be sounded in a different part. The pavane has its origins as a slow processional dance popular in the renaissance period but has since been given a new lease of life by composers including Fauré and Ravel. The music editor suggests limited use of use of the sustaining pedal particularly when the bass notes have a quarter note (crotchet) value. This is an excellent piece for exploring the tonal range of the piano but avoid playing the quieter sections too loudly. Playing the first section from bar 1 – 42 ending on the chord at the beginning of bar 42 works well as a “short version” of the movement.

Added: 2018-11-02 13:36:18

Scarborough Fair arr. viola & piano

An arrangement for viola and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. A viola part is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 18:53:28

Scarborough Fair arr. violoncello & piano

An arrangement for violoncello and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 18:11:31

Scarborough Fair arr. violin & piano

An arrangement for violin and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and whilst octave playing is explored it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. A viola part is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 17:56:53

Scarborough Fair arr. horn in F & piano

An arrangement for horn in f (French horn) and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. A horn in F part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 17:54:27

Scarborough Fair arr. bassoon & piano

An arrangement for bassoon and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode although the key note is E. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. A bassoon is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 17:51:27

Scarborough Fair arr. soprano saxophone & piano

An arrangement for soprano saxophone and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 17:44:14

Scarborough Fair arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

An arrangement for clarinet in B flat and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. A clarinet in B flat part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 17:40:47

Scarborough Fair arr. oboe & piano

An arrangement for oboe and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode with the keynote being E. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins as an English ballad written many centuries ago. An oboe part is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 17:38:14

Scarborough Fair arr. flute & piano

An arrangement for flute and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode with the key note being D. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins in the English ballad culture of many centuries ago. A flute part is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of I) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2018-10-24 16:45:17

Le Banjo (Full version in F) for solo piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk was an American composer and pianist who worked mainly outside the U.S.A. Born in New Orleans he travelled to Europe at the age of 13 to study music. Much of the early music he composed was based on music he remembered from his childhood in Louisiana where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions. From the 1860’s he was regarded as the best known pianist from the New World and his talent was recognised by both Chopin and Liszt. A tempo of 100 quarter note beats to the minutes is used in the realisation of “Le Banjo” which dates from 1853 whilst the piece needs to be played with a very even tempo with the piano being played quite percussively. The tied notes need to be carefully identified in both the melody and bass line where the acciaccaturas (crushed notes) are used to recreate the “hammer on” technique used by players of fretted instruments. The term Ardito means bold whilst Ben misurato indicates that the music needs to be played in a strict tempo and the term martelltato is an indication that the notes are to be strongly accented. Whilst this is a cut down and simplified version of the work the original in the key of F sharp major is often played by piano virtuosi as an encore. The sustaining pedal hasn’t been indicated in the score but limited use may be considered. In this arrangement for solo piano the playing context is for the music to be presented as a concert item for intermediate level players. Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races is referenced both at the beginning and the end of the arrangement whilst the trills in bar 81 and bar 149 start on the note. There is a further challenge in that a concert version of the piece can be readily sourced for those who like a real challenge.

Added: 2018-10-12 14:47:27

Le Banjo arr. violin & piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk was an American composer and pianist who worked mainly outside the U.S.A. Born in New Orleans he travelled to Europe at the age of 13 to study music. Much of the early music he composed was based on music he remembered from his childhood in Louisiana where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions. From the 1860’s he was regarded as the best known pianist from the New World and his talent was recognised by both Chopin and Liszt. A tempo of 100 quarter note beats to the minutes is used in the realisation of “Le Banjo” which dates from 1853 whilst the piece needs to be played with a very even tempo with the piano being played quite percussively. The tied notes need to be carefully identified in both the melody and bass line where the acciaccaturas (crushed notes) are used to recreate the “hammer on” technique used by players of fretted instruments. The term Ardito means bold whilst Ben misurato indicates that the music needs to be played in a strict tempo and the term martelltato is an indication that the notes are to be strongly accented. Whilst this is a cut down and simplified version of the work the original in the key of F sharp major is often played by piano virtuosi as an encore. The sustaining pedal hasn’t been indicated in the score but limited use may be considered. In this arrangement for violin and piano in the key of G the intended playing context is for the music to be presented as a concert item for intermediate level players. Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races is referenced both at the beginning and the end of the arrangement whilst the trills in bar 75 start on the note. A solo violin part is appended to the full score. There are three accompaniments available playing at (1) 96 (2) 100 and (3) 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-10-12 14:43:17

Le Banjo arr. soprano saxophone & piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk was an American composer and pianist who worked mainly outside the U.S.A. Born in New Orleans he travelled to Europe at the age of 13 to study music. Much of the early music he composed was based on music he remembered from his childhood in Louisiana where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions. From the 1860’s he was regarded as the best known pianist from the New World and his talent was recognised by both Chopin and Liszt. A tempo of 100 quarter note beats to the minutes is used in the realisation of “Le Banjo” which dates from 1853 whilst the piece needs to be played with a very even tempo with the piano being played quite percussively. The tied notes need to be carefully identified in both the melody and bass line where the acciaccaturas (crushed notes) are used to recreate the “hammer on” technique used by players of fretted instruments. The term Ardito means bold whilst Ben misurato indicates that the music needs to be played in a strict tempo and the term martelltato is an indication that the notes are to be strongly accented. Whilst this is a cut down and simplified version of the work the original in the key of F sharp major is often played by piano virtuosi as an encore. The sustaining pedal hasn’t been indicated in the score but limited use may be considered. In this arrangement for clarinet in B flat and piano the playing context is for the music to be presented as a concert item for intermediate level players. Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races is referenced both at the beginning and the end of the arrangement whilst the trills in bar 75 start on the note. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three accompaniments available playing at (1) 96 (2) 100 and (3) 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-10-12 14:40:38

Variations on the Song “I slept, I dreamed”

A theme and 10 variations selected from the set of twenty four published 1770. The writing suggests the music was intended for both the harpsichord and fortepiano. The editor has selected variations particularly appropriate to the development of piano technique and has avoided including variations which are more baroque in character and suited to being played on the harpsichord. The musical content is both charming and appealing, well suited to developing technical skills and musical memory. The tempo of the theme is played at 76 quarter notes to the minute and generally, the tempo of the variations remains the same with the minor variation possibly played a little slower. The ornamentation is straight forward and the sheet music score has ossia staves with some of the ornaments written out in full. No pedal markings have been notated in the score although some use of the sustaining pedal may be used. This is excellent music for developing keyboard technique and the music editor is surprised that the movement is not more widely known. The German title for this music is Variationen über das lied "ich schlief, da träumte mir”.

Added: 2018-10-12 11:03:02

C. P. E. Bach First Movement from Keyboard Sonata in F minor W.57/6 H.173

This music was composed in 1763 and anticipates particularly thematically and rhythmically musical directions later explored by Beethoven and others. Pianists need to approach playing this movement with clarity in their rhythmic intention and demonstrate an understanding of the context of the triplet figuration that dominates the movement. Whilst the realisation indicates the music editor’s intention as to how the music should be approached the piano touch could be on the lighter side and there could be a little more “ebb and flow” tempo wise in the cadenza like sections (bars 22-23, bars 55-56 & bars 78-79) and at cadences. Although the music texturally isn’t complicated, the piece is quite demanding to play in that a consistency of touch and articulation is required. The instrument needs to be played with a lightness of touch with the player intent upon communicating the beauty of the music. Understandably there is no evidence of performance practice from C.P.E Bach’s own time and the music editor suggests that it is quite possibly that approaches to playing of music from this period have changed over time. A tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the realisation. The music copy has been prepared with the modern piano intended as the performance instrument. Limited use of the sustaining pedal can be considered and ornaments need to be played with a similar rhythmic clarity and an understanding of context. Not many people play C.P.E.Bach’s music which is a shame because he composed works of quality and he has an important position in music history linking the Baroque with the Classical era. Both Haydn and Beethoven were influenced by his compositional approach. The music editor also suggests listening to the available recordings of the work played on a variety of different keyboard instruments. Interestingly there are many different approaches to playing this piece particularly with respect to tempo and rhythmic interpretation. Some performers approach the piece as if it is a piece of classical music even suggesting tempos and a playing approach in the style and manner of playing a Beethoven piano sonata. Recordings also have different acoustic properties although many in the music editor’s opinion are much too reverberant and consequently “rather cloudy”. The challenge is to play the piece with the intention of revealing its beauty, its texture, it’s rhythmic intention and the composer’s individual style whilst acknowledging its historical context. Whilst the music, texturally, belongs to the baroque both thematically and rhythmically the musical content looks forward and anticipates much of the keyboard music style of Haydn and Beethoven. This is an ideal challenge for some test piece at a competition or music festival because it invites so many different approaches. There is a commentary on how to play the ornaments in the score.

Added: 2018-10-11 13:06:15

Le Banjo arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk was an American composer and pianist who worked mainly outside the U.S.A. Born in New Orleans he travelled to Europe at the age of 13 to study music. Much of the early music he composed was based on music he remembered from his childhood in Louisiana where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions. From the 1860’s he was regarded as the best known pianist from the New World and his talent was recognised by both Chopin and Liszt. A tempo of 100 quarter note beats to the minutes is used in the realisation of “Le Banjo” which dates from 1853 whilst the piece needs to be played with a very even tempo with the piano being played quite percussively. The tied notes need to be carefully identified in both the melody and bass line where the acciaccaturas (crushed notes) are used to recreate the “hammer on” technique used by players of fretted instruments. The term Ardito means bold whilst Ben misurato indicates that the music needs to be played in a strict tempo and the term martelltato is an indication that the notes are to be strongly accented. Whilst this is a cut down and simplified version of the work the original in the key of F sharp major is often played by piano virtuosi as an encore. The sustaining pedal hasn’t been indicated in the score but limited use may be considered. In this arrangement for clarinet in B flat and piano the playing context is for the music to be presented as a concert item for intermediate level players. Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races is referenced both at the beginning and the end of the arrangement whilst the trills in bar 75 starts on the note. The clarinet player may wish to play the section from bar 49 – 63 with a staccato articulation. A clarinet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three accompaniments available playing at (1) 96 (2) 100 and (3) 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-10-08 19:53:11

Le Banjo arr. oboe & piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk was an American composer and pianist who worked mainly outside the U.S.A. Born in New Orleans he travelled to Europe at the age of 13 to study music. Much of the early music he composed was based on music he remembered from his childhood in Louisiana where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions. From the 1860’s he was regarded as the best known pianist from the New World and his talent was recognised by both Chopin and Liszt. A tempo of 100 quarter note beats to the minutes is used in the realisation of “Le Banjo” which dates from 1853 whilst the piece needs to be played with a very even tempo with the piano being played quite percussively. The tied notes need to be carefully identified in both the melody and bass line where the acciaccaturas (crushed notes) are used to recreate the “hammer on” technique used by players of fretted instruments. The term Ardito means bold whilst Ben misurato indicates that the music needs to be played in a strict tempo and the term martelltato is an indication that the notes are to be strongly accented. Whilst this is a cut down and simplified version of the work the original in the key of F sharp major is often played by piano virtuosi as an encore. The sustaining pedal hasn’t been indicated in the score but limited use may be considered. In this arrangement for oboe and piano the playing context is for the music to be presented as a concert item for intermediate level players. Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races is referenced both at the beginning and the end of the arrangement whilst the trills in bar 75 start on the note. An oboe part is appended to the full score. There are three accompaniments available playing at (1) 96 (2) 100 and (3) 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-10-08 19:16:55

Le Banjo arr. flute & piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk was an American composer and pianist who worked mainly outside the U.S.A. Born in New Orleans he travelled to Europe at the age of 13 to study music. Much of the early music he composed was based on music he remembered from his childhood in Louisiana where he was exposed to a variety of musical traditions. From the 1860’s he was regarded as the best known pianist from the New World and his talent was recognised by both Chopin and Liszt. A tempo of 100 quarter note beats to the minutes is used in the realisation of “Le Banjo” which dates from 1853 whilst the piece needs to be played with a very even tempo with the piano being played quite percussively. The tied notes need to be carefully identified in both the melody and bass line where the acciaccaturas (crushed notes) are used to recreate the “hammer on” technique used by players of fretted instruments. The term Ardito means bold whilst Ben misurato indicates that the music needs to be played in a strict tempo and the term martelltato is an indication that the notes are to be strongly accented. Whilst this is a cut down and simplified version of the work the original in the key of F sharp major is often played by piano virtuosi as an encore. The sustaining pedal hasn’t been indicated in the score but limited use may be considered. In this arrangement for flute and piano the playing context is for the music to be presented as a concert item for intermediate level players. Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races is referenced both at the beginning and the end of the arrangement whilst the trills in bar 75 starts on the note. There are three accompaniments available playing at (1) 96 (2) 100 and (3) 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2018-10-08 19:07:43

Little Prelude in D BWV936

A lovely piece by Bach to encourage legato playing.

Added: 2018-10-08 17:09:36

Prelude in C arr. flute, clarinet in B flat & bass clarinet

An arrangement for flute, clarinet in Bb and bass clarinet of the Little Prelude BWV 936 originally composed for the keyboard.

Added: 2018-10-08 15:20:50

Al Fresco arr. bassoon & piano

Described as an Intermezzo this is a piece of music intended to change the mood usually having a context in a larger scale work. Dating from the early years of the 20th century this is a skillfully composed piece of music and whilst presented in this context as a serious piece it could quite easily be presented as a humorous item with exaggerated tempo changes and more contrasting dynamics. The realization plays at a tempo of 96 quartet note beats to the minute although there are recorded versions that exist with much faster tempos. Tempo changes are only indicated in the closing section and not at the end of phrases and sections. The step downs in tempo at bar 121 and bar 129 need to be quite obvious. The formal model is clearly that of the American march and it can be best described as an example of early “light music.” As a piece intended to break the mood it is ideally placed as part of the repertoire in the PlentyMusic Café although it has to be confirmed whether a humorous approach to this piece is a possibility. Victor Herbert was born in Ireland, and after subsequently training and working in Germany he moved to the United States to become a very successful composer of Broadway operettas in the period between 1890 and the start of World War I in 1914. This is music that invites exaggeration in performance and the more competent the risk taker the more likely they are to succeed providing they have both the communication and technical skills to ensure success.

Added: 2018-10-06 19:41:48

Czardas arr. flute & guitar

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” which is appropriate near the end of a section and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves.There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The dynamic range in the realisation is not expressed quite as well as was intended. There are two acoustic guitar accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 12:54:48

Czardas arr. mandolin & acoustic guitar

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” which is appropriate near the end of a section and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Ralentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves.nThere is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The music editor would value feedback on the notation of the mandolin part particularly in respect to the notation of the tremolos. There are two acoustic guitar accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 12:50:20

Czardas arr. two marimbas

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Marimba players may wish to share the part playing when the repeats are played. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! There are marimba accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 12:36:34

Czardas arr. marimba & acoustic guitar

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the section between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The arrangement in the music editor’s view works well for the instrument combination and would be interested in receiving feedback. There are two acoustic guitar accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 12:32:52

Czardas arr. violin & acoustic guitar

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the section between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! There are two acoustic guitar accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 12:29:50

Czardas arr. solo piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and the sections between bar 70 to 85 can be omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own!

Added: 2018-10-03 12:27:03

Czardas arr. violoncello & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The harmonics sound at pitch but the limitations of the sampling library means that true harmonics are not being sounded. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 12:23:09

Czardas arr. viola & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The harmonics sound at pitch but the limitations of the sampling library means that true harmonics are not being sounded. A viola part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 12:00:02

Czardas arr. violin & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The harmonics sound at pitch but the limitations of the sampling library means that true harmonics are not being sounded. A violin part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:58:09

Czardas arr. marimba & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! A marimba part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:51:26

Czardas arr. tuba & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! A tuba part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:49:24

Czardas arr. trombone & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The trombone part notated in the bass and tenor clef is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:46:38

Czardas arr. bassoon & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! A bassoon part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:44:16

Czardas arr. baritone saxophone & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! A baritone saxophone part is appended to the full score.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:41:06

Czardas arr. alto saxophone & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! The small ornamental notes do not sound in the realisation. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:30:08

Czardas arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 but soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. Everyone needs to enjoy a performance of this music. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! A clarinet part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 11:25:45

Czardas arr. flute & piano

A very exciting and dramatic piece of music for audience and performers alike. Technically proficient players play the faster sections more quickly and the slower sections more slowly than in the realisation often with great rhythmic expression. Vittorio Monti was a musician and composer from Naples although this piece is often described as having its origins as Hungarian folk music. The piece has a sectional structure and repetition is a strong element although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Tempo considerations are quite important and the Allegro vivace sections initially played at 120 quarter notes to the minute. A piacere means at “one’s pleasure, at one’s will,” whilst stentato is a musical expression meaning “laboured, heavy in a dragging manner” and stringendo means progressively quickening in tempo. Rallentandos shouldn’t begin too soon at the ends of phrases. The realisation is rather tame compared to many of the performances available but it is clearly a piece where players can learn much about performing music to an audience and Czardas often features as an encore piece in concerts. The small ornamental notes are probably best omitted in the early stages of learning the piece. The music editor has indicated all tempo text in bold above the staves. There is actually no definitive arrangement of this piece and often the sections between bar 70 to 85 are omitted in performance. Performers may wish to also omit the rallentando indicated in the score at bar 98. Some music performances also have the music starting slowly at bar 86 to soon quicken to an Allegro vivace tempo. The simple advice is to make your performance your own! There are octave transpositions in the flute part although the one in the closing section is a purely optional challenge! A flute part is appended to the full score. There are two accompaniments available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats.

Added: 2018-10-03 10:40:07

Santa Lucia arr. mandolin & two acoustic guitars

Santa Lucia has its origins as a Neopolitan song with its lyrics celebrating the outdoor lives of boatmen who lived and worked in the Bay of Naples in what sound to be very happy times. When playing the piece and there are opportunities to slow the tempo at the ends of phrases which is not indicated in the score. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 110 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played in the realisation but in performance can be added. The full score is presented with appended parts for the three instrumentalists with appropriate TAB scores and graphics to support the players. A different solo instrument can be substituted for the mandolin if opportunity arises. The music editor would value feedback on how the score is presented and would also appreciate suggestions on how the format could be improved. As this will be a familiar melody to any audience the piece will need to be known thoroughly before any performance!

Added: 2018-10-02 13:02:57

Santa Lucia arr. tuba & piano

Santa Lucia has its origins as a Neopolitan song with its lyrics celebrating the outdoor lives of boatmen who lived and worked in the Bay of Naples in what sound to be very happy times. The repeat is not played in the realisation but in performance can be added. Instrument players should be aiming to develop their legato playing and quality of tone when playing the piece and there are opportunities to slow the tempo at the ends of phrases although this is not indicated in the score. Players may well want to also edit the phrasing because there are options available. A tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats is used in the playback. A tuba part is appended to the full score. As this will be a familiar melody to any audience the piece will need to be known thoroughly before any performance is given.

Added: 2018-10-02 12:47:08

Santa Lucia arr. piano in D

Santa Lucia has its origins as a Neopolitan song with its lyrics celebrating the outdoor lives of boatmen who lived and worked in the Bay of Naples in what sound to be very happy times. The repeat is not played in the realisation but in performance can be added. Instrument players should be aiming to develop their legato playing and quality of tone when playing the piece and there are opportunities to slow the tempo at the ends of phrases which is not indicated in the score. A tempo of 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats is used in the playback in this version which is in the key of D. As this will be a familiar melody to any audience the piece will need to be known thoroughly before any performance.

Added: 2018-10-02 12:42:59

Santa Lucia arr. piano in C

Santa Lucia has its origins as a Neopolitan song with its lyrics celebrating the outdoor lives of boatmen who lived and worked in the Bay of Naples in what sound to be very happy times. The repeat is not played in the realisation but in performance can be added. Instrument players should be aiming to develop their legato playing and quality of tone when playing the piece and there are opportunities to slow the tempo at the ends of phrases which is not indicated in the score. A tempo of 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats is used in the playback in this version which is in the key of C. As this will be a familiar melody to any audience the piece will need to be known thoroughly before any performance.

Added: 2018-10-02 12:40:21

Santa Lucia arr. violoncello & piano

Santa Lucia has its origins as a Neopolitan song with its lyrics celebrating the outdoor lives of boatmen who li