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Schubert F. | Ave Maria arr. trombone and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for trombone and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung, particularly for weddings, make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 32 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling trombonists to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-15 16:08:51

Schubert F. | Ave Maria arr. trumpet in B Flat and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for trumpet in Bb and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung, particularly for weddings, nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling trumpet players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-15 12:09:36

Ave Maria arr. French horn (horn in F) and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for French horn (horn in F) and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung, particularly for weddings, nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the sheet music score score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling horn players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute and are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-15 09:54:38

Ave Maria arr. cello and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for cello and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung, particularly for weddings, nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling cellists players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. In this instance cellists players have the option of playing through the repeat an octave higher. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-14 18:53:44

Ave Maria arr. violin and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for violin and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung, particularly for weddings, nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling violinists players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. In this instance violinists players have the option of playing through the repeat an octave higher. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-14 17:38:23

Ave Maria arr. viola and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for viola and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling violists to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. In this instance violists have the option of playing through the repeat an octave higher. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-14 14:59:43

Ave Maria arr. baritone saxophone and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for baritone saxophone and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling baritone saxophone players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Baritone players have the option of playing the repeat at the octave. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-09 09:38:50

Ave Maria arr. tenor saxophone and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for tenor saxophone and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling tenor saxophone players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-09 08:30:05

Ave Maria arr. alto saxophone and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for alto saxophone and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling alto saxophone players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-08 13:50:27

Ave Maria arr. soprano saxophone and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for soprano saxophone and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling soprano saxophone players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-08 12:56:37

Ave Maria arr. English horn (cor anglais) and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for English horn and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's "Ave Maria" can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling English horn players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. English horn players have the options of playing the repeat at the octave. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-07 16:11:44

Ave Maria arr. tuba and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825. This intermediate/ advanced level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for tuba and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling tuba players to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-07 13:58:14

Invitación (Invitation) arr. trumpet in B Flat and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for trumpet in Bb and piano is in the key of E minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A trumpet in Bb is appended to the full music score on the pdf download. Piano accompaniments are also available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-11-06 16:23:46

Invitación (Invitation) arr. alto saxophone and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for alto saxophone and piano is in the key of A minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. An alto saxophone part is appended to the full music score on the pdf available to download. Piano accompaniments are also available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-11-06 13:55:20

Ave Maria arr. oboe and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for oboe and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling oboists to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-06 13:25:09

Ave Maria arr. bassoon and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for bassoon and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling bassoonists to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-06 11:17:01

Ave Maria arr. clarinet in B Flat and piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediatelevel arrangement from PlentyMusic is for clarinet in Bb and piano. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggests that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the video score. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads from the PlentyMusic website enabling clarinetists to enjoy an ensemble experience as part of their daily practice routine. They are available with and without repeats and play at 32, 36, and 40 quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256kbps. The sheet music scores do have the repeats indicated so instrumentalists not playing the repeat will need to play the second ending in the score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. If you play something through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always prove to be the case. Young musicians need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments are indicated with symbols in the sheet music score but are written out in the video score which can be referenced on our YouTube channel. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please do contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat.

Added: 2021-11-05 13:19:05

Ave Maria arr. flute and classical guitar + TAB

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This is an intermediate level flute arrangement with classical guitar accompaniment in the key of A and available from PlentyMusic as a pdf sheet music download. It is available as a free score to enable guitarists to feedback to PlentyMusic as to whether or not the chord voicing be modified to make it more playable. The guitar part is notated in both staff notation and TAB. Classical guitar accompaniments are available playing back at 32, 36 and 40 quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute (bpm). They are available with and without repeats. Players not playing the repeat will need to remember to take the second ending because the repeats are indicated in the sheet music score. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat. Accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Many performances that are sung make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring of the melody has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggest that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) whilst the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse played as triplets. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. On the repeat the violin player has the option of playing the melody at the octave. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires greater concentration. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments have been written out in the video score but are indicated as symbols in the sheet music scores available as pdf download from PlentyMusic. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. When a movement involves reducing the score, as is the case in this arrangement, it means that some aspects of the music score are omitted. It is worth studying the full vocal score which may clarify some of the challenges that need to be addressed by the arranger. The approach for the violinist should be to keep the melody wherever possible and when appropriate rhythmically independent of the triplet figuration of the accompaniment. Please do let us hear and possibly share your live performances of the arrangement either by sending us a link or an mp3 or mp4 file which can be forwarded to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-11-04 09:28:59

Ave Maria arr. violin and classical guitar

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This is an intermediate level violin arrangement with classical guitar accompaniment in the key of C and available from PlentyMusic as a free sheet music download. It is available as a free score to enable guitarists to feedback to PlentyMusic as to whether or not the chord voicing be modified to make it more playable. The guitar part is notated in staff notation. Classical guitar accompaniments are available playing back at 32, 36 and 40 quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute (bpm). They are available with and without repeats. Players not playing the repeat will need to remember to take the second ending because the repeats are indicated in the sheet music score. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat. Accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Many performances that are sung make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring of the melody has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggest that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) whilst the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse played as triplets. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. On the repeat the violin player has the option of playing the melody at the octave. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires greater concentration. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments have been written out in the video score but are indicated as symbols in the sheet music scores available as pdf download from PlentyMusic. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. When a movement involves reducing the score, as is the case in this arrangement, it means that some aspects of the music score are omitted. It is worth studying the full vocal score which may clarify some of the challenges that need to be addressed by the arranger. The approach for the violinist should be to keep the melody wherever possible and when appropriate rhythmically independent of the triplet figuration of the accompaniment. Please do let us hear and possibly share your live performances of the arrangement either by sending us a link or an mp3 or mp4 file which can be forwarded to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-11-04 08:21:14

Ave Maria arr. flute and classical guitar

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This is an intermediate level flute arrangement with classical guitar accompaniment in the key of A and available from PlentyMusic as a pdf sheet music download. It is available as a free score to enable guitarists to feedback to PlentyMusic as to whether or not the chord voicing be modified to make it more playable. Classical guitar accompaniments are available playing back at 32, 36 and 40 quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute (bpm). They are available with and without repeats. Players not playing the repeat will need to remember to take the second ending because the repeats are indicated in the sheet music score. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat. Accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Many performances that are sung make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring of the melody has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggest that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) whilst the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse played as triplets. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. On the repeat the violin player has the option of playing the melody at the octave. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires greater concentration. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments have been written out in the video score but are indicated as symbols in the sheet music scores available as pdf download from PlentyMusic. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. When a movement involves reducing the score, as is the case in this arrangement, it means that some aspects of the music score are omitted. It is worth studying the full vocal score which may clarify some of the challenges that need to be addressed by the arranger. The approach for the violinist should be to keep the melody wherever possible and when appropriate rhythmically independent of the triplet figuration of the accompaniment. Please do let us hear and possibly share your live performances of the arrangement either by sending us a link or an mp3 or mp4 file which can be forwarded to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-11-03 16:45:46

Ave Maria arr. violin and classical guitar + TAB

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This is an intermediate level violin arrangement with classical guitar accompaniment in the key of C and available from PlentyMusic as a pdf sheet music download.The guitar part is notated in both staff notation and TAB. It is available as a free score to enable guitarists to feedback to PlentyMusic as to whether or not the chord voicing be modified to make it more playable. Classical guitar accompaniments are available playing back at 32, 36 and 40 quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute (bpm). They are available with and without repeats. Players not playing the repeat will need to remember to take the second ending because the repeats are indicated in the sheet music score. If you have any feedback to give about the score or require an accompaniment with a different tempo please contact PlentyMusic either by email or LiveChat. Accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Many performances that are sung make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring of the melody has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggest that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) whilst the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse played as triplets. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. On the repeat the violin player has the option of playing the melody at the octave. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires greater concentration. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments have been written out in the video score but are indicated as symbols in the sheet music scores available as pdf download from PlentyMusic. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of playing the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. When a movement involves reducing the score, as is the case in this arrangement, it means that some aspects of the music score are omitted. It is worth studying the full vocal score which may clarify some of the challenges that need to be addressed by the arranger. The approach for the violinist should be to keep the melody wherever possible and when appropriate rhythmically independent of the triplet figuration of the accompaniment. Please do let us hear and possibly share your live performances of the arrangement either by sending us a link or an mp3 or mp4 file which can be forwarded to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-11-03 09:37:08

Ave Maria arr. organ

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This arrangement from PlentyMusic for organ is part of the “Encouraging pianists to become occasional organists” collection. This song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Most performances that are sung nowadays make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. The pedal notes which are intended to be added when the movement can be played on the manuals and are indicated (apart from the final Bb) in the bass clef with their stems pointing downwards. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggest that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's Ave Maria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is probably best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. Once a section is played through once logic suggests that it will be easier to play when repeated although this does not always seem to be the case. Young musicians in particular need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments have been written out in the video score but are indicated with symbols in the sheet music scores available as pdf download from PlentyMusic. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. When a movement involves reducing the score, as is the case in this arrangement, it means that some aspects of the music score are omitted. It is worth studying the full vocal score which may clarify some of the challenges that need to be addressed by the arranger The approach for the keyboard player should be to keep the melody wherever possible and when appropriate rhythmically independent of the triplet figuration of the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-11-02 17:48:19

Ave Maria arr. intermediate level piano

Ave Maria is one of the most beautiful melodies from the romantic era composed by Schubert in 1825 This intermediate level piano arrangement from PlentyMusic is available as a pdf download. The song was composed by Schubert in 1825 as part of a song cycle based on Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. Many performances that are sung make use of the text of the Latin prayer “Ave Maria.” The work is identified as Schubert’s Opus 52 No.6 D.839. As an instrumental arrangement of Ave Maria the barring has been made appropriate for instrumentalists to read. Whilst the melody and accompaniment does sound very on the ear and suggest that it is an easy piece of music to play there are several technical and musical challenges to be overcome before Schubert's AveMaria can be played both competently and confidently. The playback tempo in the realisation is 36 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute (bpm) although the music editor suggests that it is best to learn the movement with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse triplet figuration geatured in the accompaniment. The tempo marking in Schubert’s score is Sehr langsam which means very slow. Singers do frequently take a slower tempo than instrumentalists. The tempo indication in the PlentyMusic instrumental arrangements is Largo. Whilst use of the sustaining pedal is suggested the pedal markings are only indicated in the first bar and are then hidden in the sheet music score. One of the greatest challenges in music is playing a repeat simply because playing the same music again requires much greater concentration. Logic suggests that playing a repeat should be easier to although this not always seem to be the case. Young musicians in particular need to be aware of this. Instrumentalists need to have a clear understanding and intention as to how the melody is to be played particularly from the rhythmic point of view. The cross rhythms, dotted notes, triplet figuration and ornaments all present challenges. The melody itself needs to be played in a legato or singing style. Players need to be always conscious and aware of the triplet figuration played in the accompaniment. The ornaments have been written out in the video score but are indicated with symbols in the sheet music scores available as pdf download from PlentyMusic. In bars 4 and 5 the third beat melody notes can be played as quarter notes (crotchets) and the challenges of the short essentially ornamental notes can be added later. Pianists who want to explore and be challenged furthermore can look at Liszt’s arrangement of Schubert’s work. When a movement involves reducing the score, as is the case in this arrangement, it means that some aspects of the music score are omitted. It is worth studying the full vocal score which may clarify some of the challenges that need to be addressed by the arranger The approach for the keyboard player should be to keep the melody wherever possible and when appropriate rhythmically independent of the triplet figuration of the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-11-02 11:56:37

Invitación (Invitation) arr. baritone saxophone and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for baritone saxophone and piano is in the key of A minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A baritone saxophone part is appended to the full music score on the pdf available to download. Piano accompaniments are also available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 64 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-22 11:01:59

Invitación (Invitation) arr. tenor saxophone and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for tenor saxophone and piano is in the key of A minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A tenor saxophone part is appended to the full music score on the pdf available to download. Piano accompaniments are also available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-21 16:52:18

Invitación (Invitation) arr. violin and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for violin and piano is in the original key of E minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A violin part is appended to the full music score. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-21 11:26:12

Invitación (Invitation) arr. violoncello and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for violoncello and piano is in the original key of E minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A cello part is appended to the full music score. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-21 11:11:18

Invitación (Invitation) arr. oboe and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for oboe and piano is in the key of A minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. An oboe part is appended to the full music score. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-20 15:07:46

Invitación (Invitation) arranged viola and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for viola and piano is in the key of A minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A viola part is appended to the full music score. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-20 13:21:56

Invitación (Invitation) arr. trombone and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for trombone and piano is in the key of E minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A trombone part is appended to the full music score. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-19 16:32:10

Invitación (Invitation) arranged English horn (cor anglais) and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for English horn (cor anglais) and piano is in the key of E minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. An English horn part, appropriately transposed, is appended to the full music score. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-19 16:11:41

Invitación (Invitation) arranged soprano saxophone and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for soprano saxophpne and piano is in the key of E minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. A soprano saxophone part is appended to the full music score. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-18 16:20:10

Invitación (Invitation) arranged bassoon and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for bassoon and piano is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor whilst a bassoon part is appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 68, 70, 72, 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that repeat markings are not shown in the sheet music score. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-17 17:13:58

Invitación (Invitation) arranged clarinet in B Flat and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for clarinet in Bb and piano sounds in the key of E minor and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The music is in the original key of E minor whilst a clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 66, 68, 70, 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Note that a repeat marking is not shown in the sheet music score. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-17 16:21:02

Invitación (Invitation) arr. flute and piano

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for flute accompanied by piano is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor and a flute part is appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in what are strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the solo melody line to keep to the best and most appropriate range for the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared.The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Piano accompaniments are available playing at 66, 68, 70, 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. They are recorded at 256 kbps and the music is played through twice. A click track is used to give the tempo of the movement on the mp3 accompaniment. Please note that a repeat marking is not shown in the sheet music score. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-16 13:43:22

Invitación (Invitation) arr. 3 marimba players (pitched percussion instruments)

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for 3 marimba players is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor with Individual parts for the players are appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for developing ensemble playing encouraging players to listen to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely together. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. but they are in place in the sheet music score. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring for a different combination of pitched percussion instruments be required please advise the PlentyMusic Office with details of the instruments and their ranges. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-16 09:41:55

Invitación (Invitation) arr. 2 mandolins and 2 acoustic guitars

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for 2 mandolins and 2 acoustic guitars is in the key of Em and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The music is in the original key of E minor. Individual parts for the players are appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. but they are in place in the sheet music score. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required, possibly for mandolin orchestra, please contact the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-15 09:15:59

Invitación (Invitation) arr. acoustic guitar trio

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for acoustic guitar trio is in the key of Em and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The arrangement is scored for 3 acoustic guitars ideally either 3 nylon or 3 steel strung guitars should be used. The music has been transposed is in the original key of E minor. Individual parts for the players are appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. but they are in place in the sheet music score. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required, possibly a n additional TAB score please advise the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-15 07:36:17

Invitación (Invitation) arr. brass quartet

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for brass quartet is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The arrangement is scored for 2 trumpets in Bb, trombone and tuba or bass trombone with individual parts for players are appended to the full music score in the pdf download. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 66 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required please advise the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-13 12:45:33

Invitación (Invitation) arr. clarinet quartet

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for clarinet quartet is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The arrangement is scored for 3 clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet whilst Individual parts for players are appended to the full music score in the pdf download. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 64 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required please advise the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-13 11:03:56

Invitación (Invitation) arr. saxophone quartet

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for saxophone quartet is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The arrangement is scored for soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophones whilst Individual parts for players are appended to the full music score in the pdf download. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 66 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly regarding tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required please advise the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-12 10:31:27

Invitación (Invitation) arr. string quartet

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for string quartet is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The arrangement is scored for the standard string quartet of 2 violins, viola and cello whilst Individual parts for players are appended to the full music score in the pdf download. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 64 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required please advise the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-12 09:51:56

Invitación (Invitation) arr. acoustic guitar quartet

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive work. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for acoustic guitar quartet is in the key of Em and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The arrangement is scored for 4 acoustic guitars ideally either 4 nylon or 4 steel strung guitars should be used. The music has been transposed is in the original key of E minor. Individual parts for the players are appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instruments. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. but they are in place in the sheet music score. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 68 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required, possibly a n additional TAB score please advise the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-11 13:59:36

Invitación (Invitation) arr. wind quartet (flute, oboe clarinet in B flat & bassoon)

Invitación by I. Cervantes is a short attractive musical work. This #ntermediatelevel arrangement from PlentyMusic for wind quartet is in the key of Am and features the Cuban habanera pattern. The arrangement is scored for flute, oboe and clarinet in Bb and bassoon. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. Individual parts for the wind instruments are appended to the full music score. It is an excellent piece for ensemble players to help their tuning and intonation by listening to both their own playing and the playing of others. The chromatic notes and modal shifts also make it challenging to play absolutely in tune. The music editor suggests that it is the ideal competition or test piece. The rhythmic patterns need to be secure and possibly learnt by clapping and tapping drills particularly in the context of an ensemble performance. There is surprising intensity in the music of Cervantes created by the tonal/modal ambivalence and by the many accidentals in the strong contrapuntal lines. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been made in the lines to keep to the best and most appropriate range of the instrument. Most of Cervantes movements are very short and benefit from being played through twice. The music editor has not actually made use of repeat signs in the music scores that have been prepared. The tempo of the score is marked Moderato with the movement able to be played at a range of tempi from around 64 to 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. In this arrangement the realisation plays back at 66 quarter note beats to the minute. The performance practice of the music of Cervantes varies particularly with regard to tempo and the use of rubato (speeding up and slowing down) and does not benefit from the same tradition of playing as movements by more mainstream composers. The advice is simply to listen and learn from the recordings that are available. Whilst there is the scope for more flexibility in performance than demonstrated by the realisations the music editor suggests the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and composed many short pieces for the piano most of which are imbued with the rhythms and colour of his homeland. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in his music. Should some re-scoring be required please advise the PlentyMusic Office. Please do let us hear and share your live performances which can be forwarded as mp3 and mp4 files to the PlentyMusic Office. Just advise us by email that you have a recording to share.

Added: 2021-10-11 12:47:39

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. piano (E minor original key)

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. This arrangement/transcription for solo piano is in the original key of E minor. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84bpm. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website.

Added: 2021-10-08 17:42:59

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. piano (A minor version)

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. This arrangement for solo piano is a transposition of the work to the key of A minor (up a perfect fourth from the original key of Em). The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music. The playback tempo is 84bpm. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website.

Added: 2021-10-08 17:25:51

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. piano (G minor version)

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. This arrangement for solo piano is a transposition of the work to the key of G minor (up a minor third from the original key of Em). The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music. The playback tempo is 84bpm. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website.

Added: 2021-10-08 17:20:29

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. oboe and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for oboe and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for oboe accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 14:39:21

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. soprano saxophone and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for soprano saxophone and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for soprano saxophone accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 14:06:50

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. tenor saxophone and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for tenor saxophone and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for tenor saxophone accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 13:50:33

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. baritone saxophone and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for baritone saxophone and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for baritone saxophone accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 09:13:12

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. violin and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for violin and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for violin accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music is in the original key of E minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 08:24:21

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. marimba and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for marimba) and piano enables players to develop a sense of ensemble in their playing. The arrangement is scored for marimba accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 08:15:34

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. trumpet in B Flat and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for trumpet in Bb and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for trumpet in Bb accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 08:09:04

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. horn in F (French horn) and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for horn in F (French horn) and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for horn in F (French horn) accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 08:00:47

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. trombone and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for trombone and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for trombone accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to Gm minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-08 07:52:20

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. English horn (Cor Anglais) and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for English horn and piano enables players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for English horn accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 80 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to Am minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-07 11:03:16

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. alto saxophone and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for alto saxophone and piano enables saxophonists to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for viola accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to Am minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-07 08:20:05

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. violoncello and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for cello and piano enables cellists to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for cello accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music is in the original key for the work E minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-06 12:31:33

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. viola and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for viola and piano enables viola players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for viola accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to Am minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-06 11:13:07

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. bassoon and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for bassoon and piano enables bassoon players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for bassoon accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-05 12:24:00

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. clarinet in B Flat and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for clarinet in Bb and piano enables clarinet players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for clarinet in Bb accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-05 11:18:43

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. flute and piano

Los Tres Golpes by the Cuban composer Cervantes explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for flute and piano enables flute players to develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their playing. The arrangement is scored for flute accompanied by the piano. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. Accompaniments are available playing at 80, 84 and 88bpm. They are recorded at 256kbps. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-05 09:00:50

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. string quartet

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) by the Cuban composer Ignacio Cervantes is a movement that explores the habanera pattern. The string quartet arrangement enables players to explore and develop tone, articulation and dynamic range in their ensembleplaying. The arrangement is scored for 2 violins, viola and violoncello. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores also has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-04 11:31:50

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. brass quartet

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) by the Cuban composer Ignacio Cervantes is a movement that explores the habanera pattern. The brass quartet arrangement enables players to explore and develop tone, articulation and dynamics in their playing. The arrangement is scored for 2 trumpets in Bb, trombone and tuba. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores also has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-04 08:02:02

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. clarinet quartet

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) by the Cuban composer Ignacio Cervantes is a movement that explores the habanera pattern. The clarinet quartet arrangement enables #clarinettists to explore and develop tone, articulation and dynamics in their playing. The arrangement is scored for 3 clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet.The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-03 15:39:44

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. 4 pitched percussion players (marimba)

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) by the Cuban composer Ignacio Cervntes is a movement that explores the habanera pattern. The arrangement for 4 pitched percussion players is a great performance piece enabling marimba players to explore much about the performance of music. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. Some of the articulation markings are a little ambiguous considering the percussive nature of the marimba but have been nevertheless retained. If two marimba are being used then Players 1 and 3 should play on one instrument and Players 2 and 4 on the other. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances. The music editor is quite happy to re-score the music for different pitched percussion instruments. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office of the percussion instruments that are available and their ranges.

Added: 2021-10-03 12:52:18

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. saxophone quartet

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) by the Cuban composer Ignacio Cervntes is a movement that explores the habanera pattern. The saxophone quartet arrangement is a great performance pieces enabling #saxophonists to explore tone, articulation and dynamics. The realisation for Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) is presented with a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The playback tempo is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores has a repeat in place although this is an editorial addition. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to G minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo although the music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music. whether in art music, folk or a popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is of a very quick and inventive mind particularly regarding his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. Do feedback to PlentyMusic comments about the scores and particularly the octave transpositions that could possibly be re-considered in the light of performances.

Added: 2021-10-02 18:28:00

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) arr. guitar quartet

Los Tres Golpes (The Three Knocks) by the Cuban composer Ignacio Cervantes is a movement that explores the habanera pattern. This arrangement for guitar quartet is a great performance pieces enabling guitarists to explore many aspects of their playing particularly regarding tone, the articulation of notes and dynamic range. The realisation has a repeat played which is common when Cervantes music is performed. The tempo of the realisation is 84 bpm. The sheet music scores is also presented with a repeat in place although this is editorial. The music has been transposed from the original key of E minor to A minor. The movement can be played at a variety of tempo. The music editor suggests that it is easier to decide when the movement is being played too slowly rather than too quickly! The choice of tempo is dependent on the instrument combination, the performance context and the acoustic of the recording or performance venue. There is scope to explore tempo rubato in a performance. These miniatures provide excellent playing material for players because they provide so many of the musical elements that feature in Cuban music whether in an art music, folk or popular music context. Cervantes was a composer and musician who assimilated the music elements of his home country in all his work. As he studied music formally in Cuba and in Europe his music is generally presented in a way that lends itself to being arranged in the traditions of the Western music tradition. The contrapuntal element in his music is very strong and whereas formally Cervantes always has clear melodic and harmonic direction musical ideas are presented in a sectional context which are generally repeated. The suggestion is a very quick and inventive mind particularly in his use of the habanera pattern. The melodic line in its original form for piano has a broad range (more than 3 octaves) and for many of the arrangements it is necessary to utilise octave transpositions to enable the most appropriate range of the featured solo instrument to be explored. For those interested in the voicing of the composer’s original score download the piano version which is available as a free score. The original PlentyMusic context for this movement was in the Ragtime and Relations Area of Study in which the focus was exploring syncopated rhythms including the habanera pattern. In 2021, the scores have been reviewed and a number of additional arrangements have been added to the PlentyMusic website. The arrangement would be best played with either 4 nylon strung guitars or 4 steel strung guitars. A mandolin can also be substituted for Acoustic Guitar 1.

Added: 2021-10-02 12:30:10

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) piano solo in A minor

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for solo piano with the music transposed to the key of A minor. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country.

Added: 2021-08-31 09:06:58

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. violoncello and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for violoncello with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-31 08:53:07

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arranged viola and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for viola with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-31 08:47:14

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. violin and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for violin with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-31 08:23:15

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. soprano saxophone and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-31 07:38:11

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. tenor saxophone and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for tenor saxophone with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-31 07:33:46

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. alto saxophone and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for alto saxophone with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-29 18:26:44

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. bassoon and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for bassoon with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-29 16:26:40

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. clarinet in B Flat and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for clarinet in Bb with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-29 16:22:15

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. oboe and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for oboe with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic shapes that feature in Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-29 16:05:13

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. flute and piano

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is for flute with piano accompaniment. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. The solo Instrumental part is appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf. Piano accompaniments are available playing at tempi of 56, 58 and 60 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and can be downloaded as mp3 files recorded at 256kbps quality.

Added: 2021-08-29 14:23:14

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. 3 pitched percussion instruments (marimba)

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic is an ensemble of 3 pitched percussion instruments with the marimba being featured in the realization and music score. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If the arrangement requires some re-scoring for different percussion instruments please advise the PlentyMusic office with your requirements. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-28 08:42:46

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. guitar trio

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This advanced level arrangement from PlentyMusic is for guitar trio. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If the arrangement would benefit from some re-scoring please advise the PlentyMusic office with your suggestions. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-28 07:29:45

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. saxophone sextet

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for saxophone sextet of 2 soprano, alto, 2 tenor and baritone saxophones is available as a free score. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If PlentyMusic users require some re-scoring of the movement please advise the PlentyMusic Office of your requirements. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-27 08:01:07

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. guitar sextet

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for guitar sextet is available as a free score. The intention is for the score to be played by 6 acoustic guitars although a upright bass / bass guitar could be substituted for Guitar 6. Ideally the ensemble would comprise either 6 nylon strung or 6 steel strung guitars. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If PlentyMusic users require some re-scoring of the movement please advise the PlentyMusic Office of your requirements. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-27 07:16:57

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. brass sextet

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This intermediate level arrangement from PlentyMusic for brass sextet of 3 trumpets in Bb, 2 trombones, and tuba is available as a free score. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement to encourage rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If PlentyMusic users require some re-scoring of the movement please advise the PlentyMusic Office of your requirements. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-27 06:50:13

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. clarinet sextet

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic for clarinet sextet of clarinet in Eb, 4 clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet is an intermediate level arrangement and available as a free score. If no clarinet in Eb is available substitute a flute 1 part from the free score for wind sextet. The movement features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement for encouraging rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If PlentyMusic users require some re-scoring of the movement please advise the PlentyMusic Office of your requirements. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-26 13:06:46

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. string sextet

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic for string sextet of 3 violins, 2 violas, and cello is an intermediate level arrangement and available as a free score. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement for encouraging rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If PlentyMusic users require some re-scoring of the movement please advise the PlentyMusic Office of your requirements. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-26 09:53:13

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) arr. wind sextet

Adiós A Cuba (Farewell to Cuba) is one of Ignacio Cervantes most popular works. This arrangement from PlentyMusic for wind sextet of 2 flutes, oboe, 2 clarinets in Bb and bassoon is an intermediate level arrangement and available as a free score. It features many of the rhythmic patterns characteristic of Cuban music. It is an excellent movement for encouraging rhythmic accuracy and developing a sense and awareness of pulse in ensemble music making. The rhythmic shapes need to be possibly learnt and made secure by being clapped/tapped. In the opening section with the strong repetitive element players should be aiming at tonal and dynamic contrast in their playing of the repeating motif. There are some idiomatic rhythmic shapes in the writing whilst the musical texture lends itself to being very suitable for arrangement as an ensemble piece. This is music that features modal shifts and elements of chromaticism. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. This is music that allows for subtle tempo changes in performance whether it be speeding up, slowing down or returning to an “a tempo” marking. Whilst rits. or slowing down feature in the realisation the accelerando though marked is ignored. There is an opportunity to perhaps to included pauses in the music at bars 17 and 33 although they are not indicated in the scores. In the video score the instrument parts are notated at written pitch. Octave transpositions have been explored in the lines to keep to the most appropriate ranges of instruments. Players may well want to explore octave ranges of the instrument they are playing. The music editor suggests downloading the free piano sheet music score from the website to understand the relative pitch elements of the music score. Ignacio Cervantes was born in Havana, Cuba and this is one of his most popular pieces and melancholy in character. The habanera rhythmic pattern features strongly in the music of the composer who mostly composed for the piano. His piano pieces tend to be quite short but are idiomatic and imbued with the colours and rhythms of his home country. If PlentyMusic users require some re-scoring of the movement please advise the PlentyMusic Office of your requirements. Instrumental parts are appended to the full music score which can be downloaded as a pdf.

Added: 2021-08-26 06:11:58

Minuet and Trio in E Flat D.335 arr. soprano saxophone and piano

The Minuet and Trio in Eb by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this intermediate level arrangement for soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment is available from PlentyMusic. Piano accompaniments are also available. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the music scores is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations and players would be wise to explore the question and answer aspect of this piece. The movement originates as a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. A soprano saxophone part is appended to the full score which can download from the website.

Added: 2021-08-06 07:07:46

Minuet and Trio in E arr. violin and piano D.335

The Minuet and Trio in E by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this intermediate level arrangement for violin with piano accompaniment is available to download available from PlentyMusic. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the music scores is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations and players would be wise to explore the question and answer aspect of this piece. The movement originates as a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. A violin part is appended to the full score which is available as a pdf download from PlentyMusic.

Added: 2021-08-06 06:54:28

Minuet and Trio in E D.335 arr. clarinet in A and piano

The Minuet and Trio in E by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this is an intermediate level arrangement for clarinet in A with piano accompaniment. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. A clarinet in A part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. Three piano accompaniments playing at 112, 116 and 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute are also available enabling players to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the flute and piano realisation is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles.

Added: 2021-08-05 17:53:24

Minuet and Trio in Eb D.335 arr. baritone saxophone and piano

The Minuet and Trio in Eb by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this intermediate level arrangement for baritone saxophone with piano accompaniment is available from PlentyMusic. Piano accompaniments are also available. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the music scores is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations and players would be wise to explore the question and answer aspect of this piece. The movement originates as a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. A baritone saxophone part is appended to the full score which can download from the website.

Added: 2021-08-05 17:39:16

Minuet and Trio in E arr. bassoon and piano D.335

The Minuet and Trio in E by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this intermediate level arrangement for bassoon with piano accompaniment is available from PlentyMusic. Piano accompaniments are also available. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the music scores is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations and players would be wise to explore the question and answer aspect of this piece. The movement originates as a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. A bassoon part is appended to the full score which can download from the website.

Added: 2021-08-05 15:03:38

Minuet and Trio in E arr. violoncello and piano D.335

The Minuet and Trio in E by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this intermediate level arrangement for cello with piano accompaniment is available to download from PlentyMusic. A cello part is also appended to the full score. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the music scores is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations and players would be wise to explore the question and answer aspect of this piece. The movement originates as a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles.

Added: 2021-08-05 13:26:28

Minuet and Trio in E Flat D.335 arr. tenor saxophone and piano

The Minuet and Trio in E Flat D.335 by Franz Schubert is an excellent intermediate level performance piece. This arrangement is for tenor saxophone with piano accompaniment. A tenor saxophone part is also appended to the full score. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. Three piano accompaniments playing at 112, 116 and 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute are also available enabling players to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the flute and piano realisation is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles

Added: 2021-08-05 09:56:06

Minuet and Trio in E D.335 solo piano

The Minuet and Trio in E by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this plai score version for solo piano is available as a free score from PlentyMusic as a pdf download. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. It is an excellent performance piece. The Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. Both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. Piano pedalling has not been indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate particularly in the trio section. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. Pianists would be well advised to approach the playing of the two movements with a lightness in their hands. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small notes in bar (acciaccaturas or crushed notes) do not sound in the realisation in bar 41. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Pianists and keyboard players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Phrasing can be very much determined by the choice of fingering with regular 8 bar phrases predominantly feature. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. Both a plain score and an edited music score are available from PlentyMusic. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles.

Added: 2021-08-05 08:19:33

Minuet and Trio in E Flat D.335 arr. clarinet in B flat and piano

The Minuet and Trio in E Flat by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this arrangement for clarinet in Bb and piano is at the intermediate level work. A cello part is appended to the full score that is available for download from PlentyMusic. Whilst described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. Three piano accompaniments playing at 112, 116 and 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute are also available enabling players to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the flute and piano realisation is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles.

Added: 2021-08-04 18:52:51

Minuet and Trio in E D.335 arr. flute and piano

The Minuet and Trio in E by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this arrangement for flute and piano is an intermediate level work. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. A flute part is appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. Three piano accompaniments playing at 112, 116 and 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute are also available enabling players to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the chamber music scores is 120 quarter note beats to the bar whilst both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles.

Added: 2021-08-04 10:16:36

Minuet and Trio in E Flat D.335 arr. brass quartet

The Minuet and Trio in Eb by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this is an arrangement for brass quartet of 2 trumpets in Bb, French horn and trombone. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. Individual instrument parts are appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the chamber music scores is 116 quarter note beats to the bar whilst both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. Should any changes, re-scoring or arrangements for another instrument grouping be needed please contact the PlentyMusic Office and the music editor will respond to the request. PlentyMusic.

Added: 2021-08-03 18:28:22

Minuet and Trio in E D.335 arr. string quartet

The Minuet & Trio in E by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this arrangement for string quartet is scored for 2 violins, viola and violoncello. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. Individual instrument parts are appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the chamber music scores is 116 quarter note beats to the bar whilst both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. Should any changes, re-scoring or arrangements for another instrument grouping be needed please contact the PlentyMusic Office and the music editor will respond to the request. PlentyMusic.

Added: 2021-08-03 13:32:34

Minuet and Trio in E Flat D.335 arr. clarinet quartet

The Minuet & Trio in E Flat by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this arrangement is for clarinet quartet comprising 3 clarinets in Bb and a bass clarinet. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. Individual instrument parts are appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the chamber music scores is 116 quarter note beats to the bar whilst both the Minuet and Trio are played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases feature predominantly. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. Should any changes, re-scoring or arrangements for another instrument grouping be needed please contact the PlentyMusic Office and the music editor will respond to the request. Individual clarinets parts are appended to the full score which is available as a pdf download from PlentyMusic.

Added: 2021-08-03 12:55:08

Minuet and Trio in E Flat D.335 arr. saxophone quartet

The Minuet & Trio in Eb by Franz Schubert is an excellent performance piece and this arrangement is for saxophone quartet comprising soprano, 2 alto and tenor saxophones. Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. Individual instrument parts are appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the PlentyMusic website. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the chamber music scores is 116 quarter note beats to the bar with the Minuet and Trio played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases predominantly feature. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. Should any changes, re-scoring or arrangements for another instrument grouping be needed please contact the PlentyMusic Office and the music editor will respond to the request.

Added: 2021-08-03 10:55:23

Minuet and Trio in E D.335 arr. wind quartet

Whilst the work is described as a Minuet with two Trios only the second Trio has been used in this arrangement. It is an excellent performance piece. Individual instrument parts are appended to the full score which can be downloaded as pdf file from the website. The Minuet and Trio are performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. In a performance the Minuet and Trio should be performed as follows. Minuet AABB | Trio AABB | Minuet AB. The playback tempo of the chamber music scores is 116 quarter note beats to the bar with the Minuet and Trio played at the same tempo. Legato playing is required in the playing of the Trio section. Many of the melodic ideas from the music from the classical and romantic era can be understood to be almost like conversations. The movement was originally a work for solo piano. The triplet figuration is a prominent feature in the melodic line which has a range of two octaves in essentially a two, three sometimes four-part texture. The small ornamental notes in bar 41 do not sound in the realisation and possibly are best not added until the movement can be played competently. This an excellent movement for developing the playing of a range of different articulations. Players should explore the dynamic element in their performances exploring contrasting dynamics. A movement with clarity of intention particularly in respect to its rhythmic detail. Regular 8 bar phrases predominantly feature. The pause marks indicated in the sheet music score are an aspect of the score detail that can be explored in a live performance. The compositional basis of much music from the classical era is concerned with the exploration of contrast. This is a feature that can be readily identified in the music of Schubert. There are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website featuring a range of instruments and ensembles. Should any changes, re-scoring or arrangements for another instrument grouping be needed please contact the PlentyMusic Office and the music editor will respond to the request.

Added: 2021-08-03 09:04:03

Bartok B. | Bear Dance for piano solo from Ten Easy Pieces Sz.39

Bartok approach to much of his piano writing is that he considers it to be a percussion instrument. Much of his music sounds challenging but often it is quite playable. The challenge is more on the musical ear and technique rather than the musical content. It is a case of the listener being challenged. The score detail is a strong element in the sheet music copy. Bartok’s music scores do require careful study. The melodic shapes and patterns in this movements are strong and repetitive and the rhythmic element music is particularly strong. He was a great experimenter with sounds and in that he has much in common with Stravinsky. Bartok is one of the best 20th century composers to study because he is excellent at preparing the ear’s of a musician for modern sounds. Bartok’s music does possess great symmetry and his music does identify with the tonal tradition. His music might not sound tonal at times but the functionality in all sense and purpose is tonal. Bartok’s music is often derived from the rhythms and sounds of folk melodies he heard as a child and adult. The music editor suggests that this is an excellent performance piece for aspiring musicians.

Added: 2021-07-20 12:15:02

Second Movement Rondo from Sonatina in E Flat No.6 Opus 20

The music of J. L. Dussek is well worth discovering and playing. His Opus 20 Sonatinas are brimming with invention and musical interest and are perfect for developing a secure technique on a piano. This is music that both expresses and possesses the joy of its time. A rondo is a movement with a recurring theme. The repeats do not playback in the realisation. Music that has design and clear direction that is essentially pianistic. Musical ideas need to be clearly articulated without necessarily being exaggerated. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 72 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many of the early published scores of this movement have score detail that possibly is more suitable for the dry acoustic of earlier wooden framed pianos. Pianists may wish to add their own additional score detail particularly in respect to the note articulations but the music editors view is that is best to be minimalist. Some notes may require a staccato, an accent or tenuto marking but this aspect of performance is secondary to the requirement for secure fingering as encourages secure technique. Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven is a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is modern practice. The chromaticism in this movement suggests that this is more romantic than classical music. Dusssek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed music for the harp. The plain score is available as a free score and an edited music score with suggested fingering is available from PlentyMusic for one credit. In the edited music score the suggested fingering is notated above the note for the right hand and below the note for the left hand. Look out for the changing finger on a note which currently cannot be represented as clearly as the music editor intends. Bar 10 and 61 should logically contain the same music but they don’t. Players may well want to consider how they approach these two bars. A possible error in the score but by whom? The copyist, the engraver(s) or even the composer? It’s a much better question than you imagine because music printing of the distant past had so many inconsistencies. The music editor’s view is simply that many composers just did not have time to proof read the printer’s copy.

Added: 2021-07-16 10:30:02

First Movement from Sonatina in E Flat No.6 Opus 20

Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven is a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. His Opus 20 Sonatinas are well worth exploring. A purposeful and dynamic intermediate level movement for solo piano. The repeats do not playback in the realisation. Clarity in the articulation of the music achieved by shortening some of the notes and an increasing the dynamics. Smorzando translates as dying away. The realisation plays back at 116 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Allegro is the indicated tempo marking in the sheet music score. Whilst musical ideas need to be clearly articulated there should not be exaggeration in the playing. There is opportunity to practice crossing over of hands. Many of the early published scores of this movement have score detail that possibly is more suitable for the dry acoustic of earlier wooden framed pianos. Pianists may wish to add their own additional score detail particularly in respect to the articulation of notes but the music editors view is that is best to be minimalist. Some notes may require a staccato, an accent or tenuto marking but not too many! Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is modern practice. The chromaticism in this movement does suggest more romantic than classical music. Dussek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed music for the harp. The plain score is available as a free score whilst the edited music score is available for one credit.

Added: 2021-07-16 10:25:43

Second Movement Rondo from Sonatina in E Flat No.6 Opus 20

The music of J. L. Dussek is well worth discovering and playing. His Opus 20 Sonatinas are brimming with invention and musical interest and are perfect for developing a secure technique on a piano. This is music that both expresses and possesses the joy of its time. A rondo is a movement with a recurring theme. The repeats do not playback in the realisation. Music that has design and clear direction that is essentially pianistic. Musical ideas need to be clearly articulated without necessarily being exaggerated. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 72 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Many of the early published scores of this movement have score detail that possibly is more suitable for the dry acoustic of earlier wooden framed pianos. Pianists may wish to add their own additional score detail particularly in respect to the note articulations but the music editors view is that is best to be minimalist. Some notes may require a staccato, an accent or tenuto marking but this aspect of performance is secondary to the requirement for secure fingering as encourages secure technique. Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven is a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is modern practice. The chromaticism in this movement suggests that this is more romantic than classical music. Dusssek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed music for the harp. The plain score is available as a free score and an edited music score with suggested fingering is available from PlentyMusic for one credit. In the edited music score the suggested fingering is notated above the note for the right hand and below the note for the left hand. Look out for the changing finger on a note which currently cannot be represented as clearly as the music editor intends. Bar 10 and 61 should logically contain the same music but they don’t. Players may well want to consider how they approach these two bars. A possible error in the score but by whom? The copyist, the engraver(s) or even the composer? It’s a much better question than you imagine because music printing of the distant past had so many inconsistencies. The music editor’s view is simply that many composers just did not have time to proof read the printer’s copy.

Added: 2021-07-16 08:04:05

First Movement from Sonatina in E Flat No.6 Opus 20

Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven is a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. His Opus 20 Sonatinas are well worth exploring. A purposeful and dynamic intermediate level movement for solo piano. The repeats do not playback in the realisation. Clarity in the articulation of the music achieved by shortening some of the notes and an increasing the dynamics. Smorzando translates as dying away. The realisation plays back at 116 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Allegro is the indicated tempo marking in the sheet music score. Whilst musical ideas need to be clearly articulated there should not be exaggeration in the playing. There is opportunity to practice crossing over of hands. Many of the early published scores of this movement have score detail that possibly is more suitable for the dry acoustic of earlier wooden framed pianos. Pianists may wish to add their own additional score detail particularly in respect to the articulation of notes but the music editors view is that is best to be minimalist. Some notes may require a staccato, an accent or tenuto marking but not too many! Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is modern practice. The chromaticism in this movement does suggest more romantic than classical music. Dussek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed music for the harp. The plain score is available as a free score whilst the edited music score is available for one credit.

Added: 2021-07-16 07:53:58

Second Movement Rondo from Sonatina in G (Edited)

The movement is an improverlevel work and excellent for developing a secure and reliable keyboard technique. Dussek a Czech composer contributed much fine music to the piano repertoire. This short movement is described as a rondo in the tempo of a minuet. The first and last main sections are in G major whilst the middle section is in the tonic minor: G minor. A tempo of 50 dotted quarter notes (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the realisation. Allegretto would be the most appropriate tempo marking. The articulation markings familiar in older editions of this movement frequently include staccato, tenuto and accents in their score detail. Understanding that the thinner toned pianos of earlier times possibly required more exaggerated playing to communicate the musical ideas. The music editor prefers a more minimalist approach as far as indicating score detail particularly in respect to note articulations. The best advice is always to mark your own music copy of the score from knowledge of playing the music score, listening to performances and possibly from a music lesson or two. Generally, in music of this style and period it is a legato keyboard touch that should be encouraged. Exaggerated playing particularly on modern instruments should be avoided. Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven is a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is the practice in modern piano recitals. The chromaticism in this movement does suggest a more romantic approach than classical. Dusssek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed much fine music for the harp.The plain score is available as a free score from PlentyMusic whilst an edited music score is available for 1 credit from PlentyMusic.

Added: 2021-07-13 15:27:35

Second Movement Rondo from Sonatina in G No.1 (Plain)

The movement is an improver level work and excellent for developing a secure and reliable keyboard technique. Dussek a Czech composer contributed much fine music to the piano repertoire. This short movement is described as a rondo in the tempo of a minuet. The first and last main sections are in G major whilst the middle section is in the tonic minor: G minor. A tempo of 50 dotted quarter notes (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the realisation. Allegretto would be the most appropriate tempo marking. The articulation markings familiar in older editions of this movement frequently include staccato, tenuto and accents in their score detail. Understanding that the thinner toned pianos of earlier times possibly required more exaggerated playing to communicate the musical ideas. The music editor prefers a more minimalist approach as far as indicating score detail particularly in respect to note articulations. The best advice is always to mark your own music copy of the score from knowledge of playing the music score, listening to performances and possibly from a music lesson or two. Generally, in music of this style and period it is a legato keyboard touch that should be encouraged. Exaggerated playing particularly on modern instruments should be avoided. Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven is a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is the practice in modern piano recitals. The chromaticism in this movement does suggest a more romantic approach than classical. Dusssek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed much fine music for the harp.The plain score is available as a free score from PlentyMusic whilst an edited music score is available for 1 credit from PlentyMusic.

Added: 2021-07-13 15:19:54

First Movement Sonatina in G No.1 Opus 20 (Edited)

The music editor suggests that this is a great movement to clarify where someone is with their #piano playing. Dussek a Czech composer contributed much fine music to both the piano and harp repertoire. The movement needs to be played with a lightness in the hands and fingers. It is a good test of evaluating both technique and musical understanding/comprehension not that one always wants to do this by a formal examination. The musical ideas do need to be articulated with clarity and some notes are shorter than others and some phrases need to be emphasised more than others. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested although pedal markings are not indicated in the sheet music score. This is music from a time when musical ideas need to be articulated without necessarily being exaggerated which is an element often suggested in edited copies of the score. Many of the early published scores of this movement have score detail that possibly is more appropriate for the dry acoustic of an earlier wooden framed pianos. Pianists may wish to add their own score detail particularly in respect to the articulation of notes but the music editors view is that is best to be minimalist. Some notes may require a staccato, an accent, a tenuto marking or possibly phrase markings but the first focus needs to be establishing secure fingering to enable the development of a fine legato when playing the piano. Music editing is very much a continuing process. Keyboard players should continually review their performances reviewing the score detail whether it be the choice of fingering, phrase markings or note articulations. Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is modern practice. The chromaticism in this movement does suggest a more romantic context than a classical one. Dussek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed music for the harp. The plain score is available as a free score whilst an edited music score is available from PlentyMusic for one credit.

Added: 2021-07-13 15:07:25

First Movement Sonatina in G No.1 Opus 20 (Plain)

The music editor suggests that this is a great movement to clarify where someone is with their #piano playing. Dussek a Czech composer contributed much fine music to both the piano and harp repertoire. The movement needs to be played with a lightness in the hands and fingers. It is a good test of evaluating both technique and musical understanding/comprehension not that one always wants to do this by a formal examination. The musical ideas do need to be articulated with clarity and some notes are shorter than others and some phrases need to be emphasised more than others. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested although pedal markings are not indicated in the sheet music score. This is music from a time when musical ideas need to be articulated without necessarily being exaggerated which is an element often suggested in edited copies of the score. Many of the early published scores of this movement have score detail that possibly is more appropriate for the dry acoustic of an earlier wooden framed pianos. Pianists may wish to add their own score detail particularly in respect to the articulation of notes but the music editors view is that is best to be minimalist. Some notes may require a staccato, an accent, a tenuto marking or possibly phrase markings but the first focus needs to be establishing secure fingering to enable the development of a fine legato when playing the piano. Music editing is very much a continuing process. Keyboard players should continually review their performances reviewing the score detail whether it be the choice of fingering, phrase markings or note articulations. Dussek was a Czech composer and like Beethoven a transition figure linking the classical period to the romantic in a music history context. Dussek himself was a widely travelled piano virtuoso and was the first pianist to sit with his profile to the audience as is modern practice. The chromaticism in this movement does suggest a more romantic context than a classical one. Dussek is important too for encouraging the extension of the range of the piano to the 6-octave range and introducing pedal markings in the writing of piano music. He also composed music for the harp. The plain score is available as a free score whilst an edited music score is available from PlentyMusic for one credit.

Added: 2021-07-13 14:49:14

Minuet in A piano D.334

Schubert’s Minuet in A D.334 is a hidden gem of the music repertoire and needs to played to become better known by instrument players and audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement. There are also many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website for different combinations of instruments. The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score whilst the falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager. No piano pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing.

Added: 2021-07-05 13:27:28

Minuet in A arr. violoncello and piano D.334

Schubert’s Minuet in A D.334 is a hidden gem of the music repertoire and needs to played to become better known by instrument players and audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement, there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score whilst the falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager. Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No piano pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. A part for the violoncello is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 10:46:28

Minuet in A arr. violin and piano D.334

The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score with the falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet being a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. It is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager! Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. This is one of those hidden gems in the music repertoire that needs to played and become known by instrument players and their audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement. there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. A part for the violin is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 10:30:20

Minuet in A Flat arr. tenor saxophone and piano D.334

The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation and has been transposed down a semitone to the key of Ab. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score although when necessary there are some octave transpositions to keep to a convenient range of the solo instrument. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Whilst originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager. Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No piano pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. This is a hidden gems of the music repertoire that needs to played and become better known by instrument players and their audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement, there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. A part for the tenor saxophone appropriately transposed is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 09:43:51

Minuet in A Flat arr. alto saxophone and piano D.334

The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation and has been transposed down a semitone to the key of Ab. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score although when necessary there are some octave transpositions to keep to a convenient range of the solo instrument. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Whilst originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager. Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No piano pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. This is a hidden gems of the music repertoire that needs to played and become better known by instrument players and their audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement, there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. A part for the alto saxophone appropriately transposed is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 09:31:08

Minuet in A Flat arr. soprano saxophone and piano D.334

The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation and has been transposed down a semitone to the key of Ab. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score although when necessary there are some octave transpositions to keep to a convenient range of the solo instrument. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Whilst originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager! Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No piano pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. This is a hidden gems of the music repertoire and needs to played and become better known by instrument players and their audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement, there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. A part for the soprano saxophone appropriately transposed is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 07:48:18

Minuet in A arr. bassoon and piano D.334

The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score although when necessary there are some octave transpositions to keep to a convenient range of the solo instrument. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Whilst originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager! Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. This is one of those hidden gems in the music repertoire that needs to played and become known by instrument players and their audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement. there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. A part for the bassoon is appended to the full score in the pdf download. The part utilises both the bass and the tenor clefs.

Added: 2021-07-05 07:40:35

Minuet in A arr. clarinet in A and piano D.334

The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score although when necessary there are some octave transpositions to keep to a convenient range of the solo instrument. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Whilst originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager. Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. This is one of those hidden gems in the music repertoire that needs to played and become known by instrument players and their audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement. there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. A part for the clarinet in A is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 07:37:14

Minuet in A Flat D.334 arr. clarinet in B Flat and piano D.334

Schubert’s Minuet D.334 is a hidden gem of the music repertoire that needs to played and become known by instrument players and audiences. The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score although when necessary there are some octave transpositions to keep to a convenient range of the solo instrument. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Whilst originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager! Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. A part for the flute is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 07:31:26

Minuet in A arr. oboe and piano D.334

Schubert’s Minuet in A D.334 is a hidden gem of the music repertoire and needs to played to become better known by instrument players and audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement, there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score whilst the falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager. Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No piano pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. A part for the oboe is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 07:26:01

Minuet in A arr. flute and piano D.334

The Minuet is performed without the written repeats sounding in the realisation. This is a quite enchanting movement demonstrating how much Franz Schubert related to chamber music playing. The arrangements keep close to Schubert’s original score although when necessary there are some octave transpositions to keep to a convenient range of the solo instrument. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver with delicacy and musicality. Whilst originally a solo work for piano it is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of musical texture from the historical period around 1820. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. One of the most challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Players should be aiming for a legato in their playing and the avoidance of any exaggerated playing. The playing challenge is to communicate the simplicity of the movement as musically as possible. Composers are often in their “best to understand” mode in what many might consider are relatively easy pieces of music to play. Simplicity is often when they are at their clearest and this can be revealing in understanding and making sense of how to play more challenging works. This work was originally composed for piano with the suggested date for the composition being 1816 establishing it as the work of a teenager. Piano accompaniments with the score repeats played, are available, over a range of tempi and are available as mp3 downloads. No pedalling is indicated in the music score although its use is appropriate. The pedalling should not be too heavy and pedal points should relate to changes in the harmony. The tempo of the minuet and the trio section is the same in the realisation. This is not always the case in Minuet and Trio playing. This is one of those hidden gems in the music repertoire that needs to played and become known by instrument players and audiences. An ideal concert even encore movement. there are many arrangements to be discovered on the PlentyMusic website. A part for the flute is appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-05 07:18:57

Minuet in A Flat arr. brass quintet of 2 trumpets, French horn, trombone and tuba D.334

The brass quintet arrangement of the Minuet is available from PlentyMusic as a free score. The full score has appended parts and is available as a pdf download. Using the PlentyMusic android app the music could be printed from a smart phone. The brass quintet arrangement is scored for 2 trumpets in Bb, French horn, 2 trombone and tuba. Individual instrument parts transposed where appropriate are appended to the full score in the pdf download. The Minuet and Trio is performed without the repeats in the Minuet sounding. A quiet enchanting movement that demonstrates how much that Franz Schubert was a chamber musician. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver musically and accurately. It is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of a musical texture in the romantic era. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. Another challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. If you would like the movement to be scored for any other instruments please advise the PlentyMusic Office and one of the team will explore the possibilities. PlentyMusic would be interested in hearing and seeing any performances of this movement either in mp3 or mp4 format.

Added: 2021-07-04 17:09:54

Minuet in A Flat arr. clarinet quintet of 4 clarinets in B Flat and bass clarinet

The clarinet quintet arrangement of the Minuet is available from PlentyMusic as a free score. The full score has appended parts and is available as a one file pdf download. Using the PlentyMusic android app the music could be printed from a smart phone. The clarinet quintet arrangement is scored for 4 clarinets in Bb and a bass clarinet. The Minuet and Trio is performed without the repeats in the Minuet sounding in the realisation. A quiet enchanting movement that demonstrates how much that Franz Schubert was a chamber musician. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver musically and accurately. It is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of a musical texture in the romantic era. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. Another challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. If you would like the movement to be scored for different instruments please advise the PlentyMusic Office and one of the team will explore the possibilities. PlentyMusic would be interested in hearing and seeing any performances of this movement either in mp3 or mp4 format.

Added: 2021-07-04 15:55:48

Minuet in A Flat arr. for saxophone quintet of soprano, 2 alto, tenor and baritone saxophones D.334

The saxophone arrangement of the Minuet in Ab D.338 available from PlentyMusic as a free score. The full score has appended parts and is available as a one file pdf download. Using the PlentyMusic android app the music could be printed from a smart phone. The saxophone quintet arrangement is scored for soprano, 2 alto, tenor and baritone saxophones. The Minuet and Trio is performed without the repeats in the Minuet sounding in the realisation. A quiet enchanting movement that demonstrates how much that Franz Schubert was a chamber musician. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver musically and accurately. It is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of a musical texture in the romantic era. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. Another challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. If you would like the movement to be scored for a different instrument combination please advise the PlentyMusic Office and one of the team will explore the possibilities. PlentyMusic would be interested in hearing and seeing any performances of this movement either in mp3 or mp4 format.

Added: 2021-07-04 14:37:47

Minuet in A arr. string quintet of violins 1, 2, 3, viola and violoncello D.334

The string quintet arrangement of the Minuet in A D.334 is available from PlentyMusic as a free score. The full score has appended parts and is available as a one file pdf download.The arrangement is scored for Violin 1, Violin 2, Violin 3, Viola and Violoncello. Using the PlentyMusic android app the music could be printed from a smart phone. Schubert’s Minuet D.334 is a hidden gem of the music repertoire that needs to played and become known by instrument players and audiences. If PlentyMusic users would like the movement to be scored for any additional instruments please advise the PlentyMusic Office and one of the team will respond. The Minuet and Trio is performed without the repeats in the Minuet sounding in the video score. A quiet enchanting movement that adds evidence to the suggestion that Franz Schubert was essentially a chamber musician. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver musically and accurately. Whilst a solo work for piano it is very evident that the musical conception could quite easily be for a group of musicians. It is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of a musical texture in the romantic era. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. Another challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Individual instrument parts transposed where appropriate are appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-04 13:47:31

Minuet in A arr. wind quintet of flute, oboe, clarinet in A, horn in F (French horn) and bassoon D.334

The wind quintet arrangement of the Minuet for flute, oboe, clarinet in A, French horn and bassoon is available from PlentyMusic as a free score. The full score has appended parts and is available as a one file pdf download. Using the PlentyMusic android app the music could be printed from a smart phone. Schubert’s Minuet D.334 is a hidden gem of the music repertoire that needs to played and become known by instrument players and audiences. If PlentyMusic users would like the movement to be score for any additional instruments please advise the PlentyMusic Office and one of the team will respond. The Minuet and Trio is performed without the repeats in the Minuet sounding in the video score. A quiet enchanting movement that adds evidence to the suggestion that Franz Schubert was essentially a chamber musician. The falling melodic shape / motif at the end of the Minuet is a lovely challenge for performers to deliver musically and accurately. Whilst a solo work for piano it is very evident that the musical conception could quite easily be for a group of musicians. It is an excellent movement for developing an understanding of a musical texture in the romantic era. The music editor suggests a one to the bar feel in performance. A tempo of 56 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the bar is used in the realisation. Another challenging aspect of performing this Minuet is distinguishing the notes that are tied from the ones that are slurred. Individual instrument parts transposed where appropriate are appended to the full score in the pdf download.

Added: 2021-07-04 13:08:08

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Added: 2021-06-09 07:45:45

Study in Canon No.5 arr. violin, violoncello and piano

A quite vivid movement although one isn’t sure what Schumann is endeavouring to describe although from the music view a march pattern is suggested both by the time signature and the musical ideas. The arrangement for violin, violoncello and piano has a playback tempo of 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No. 5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. The imitation in this movement is shared first between the violin and violoncello and in the final section between the piano and violin. The trio versions are strong simply because the contrasting timbres enable the musical ideas and imitation to be communicated more readily. Understand that the canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. This is a challenging music setting to engrave and prepare for print mainly because the score has so much detail which is not easy to represent with clarity on the sheet music page. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads featuring the violoncello and piano parts playing at 92, 96, 100 and 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This enables a clarinet player to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. The accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. Parts for the violin and violoncello are appended to the full score.

Added: 2021-06-04 08:32:16

Study in Canon No.5 arr. clarinet in B Flat, bass clarinet and piano

A quite vivid movement although one isn’t sure what Schumann is endeavouring to describe although from the music view a march pattern is suggested both by the time signature and the musical ideas. The arrangement for clarinet in Bb, bass clarinet and piano has a playback tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The music has been transposed down a tone and sounds in the key of A minor. A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No. 5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. The imitation in this movement is shared first between the clarinet in Bb and bass clarinet and in the final section between the piano and clarinet in Bb. The trio versions are strong simply because the contrasting timbres enable the musical ideas and imitation to be communicated more readily. Understand that the canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. This is a challenging music setting to engrave and prepare for print mainly because the score has so much detail which is not easy to represent with clarity on the sheet music page. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads featuring the violoncello and piano parts playing at 92, 96, 100 and 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This enables a clarinet in Bb player to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. The accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. Parts for the two clarinets appropriately transposed are appended to the full score.

Added: 2021-06-04 08:26:13

Study in Canon No.5 arr. soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone and piano

A quite vivid movement although one isn’t sure what Schumann is endeavouring to describe although from the music view a march pattern is suggested both by the time signature and the musical ideas. The arrangement for soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone and piano has a playback tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The music has been transposed down a tone and sounds in the key of A minor. There are some octave transpositions in the tenor saxophone part. A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No. 5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. The imitation in this movement is shared first between the soprano and tenor saxophone and in the final section between the piano and soprano saxophone. The trio versions are strong simply because the contrasting timbres enable the musical ideas and imitation to be communicated more readily. Understand that the canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. This is a challenging music setting to engrave and prepare for print mainly because the score has so much detail which is not easy to represent with clarity on the sheet music page. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads featuring the tenor saxophone and piano parts playing at 92, 96, 100 and 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This enables a soprano saxophone player to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. The accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. Parts for the soprano saxophone and tenor saxophone appropriately transposed are appended to the full score.

Added: 2021-06-04 08:18:13

Study in Canon No.5 arr. clarinet in A, violoncello and piano

A quite vivid movement although one isn’t sure what Schumann is endeavouring to describe although from the music view a march pattern is suggested both by the time signature and the musical ideas. The arrangement for clarinet in A, violoncello and piano has a playback tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The music has been transposed down a tone and sounds in the key of A minor. A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No. 5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. The imitation in this movement is shared first between the clarinet and violoncello and in the final section between the piano and clarinet in A. The trio versions are strong simply because the contrasting timbres enable the musical ideas and imitation to be communicated more readily. Understand that the canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. This is a challenging music setting to engrave and prepare for print mainly because the score has so much detail which is not easy to represent with clarity on the sheet music page. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads featuring the violoncello and piano parts playing at 92, 96, 100 and 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This enables a clarinet in A player to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. The accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. Parts for the clarinet in A appropriately transposed and violoncello are appended to the full score.

Added: 2021-06-03 13:01:34

Study in Canon No.5 arr. oboe, violoncello and piano

A quite vivid movement although one isn’t sure what Schumann is endeavouring to describe although from the music view a march pattern is suggested both by the time signature and the musical ideas. The arrangement for oboe, violoncello and piano has a playback tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No. 5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. The imitation in this movement is shared first between the oboe and violoncello and in the final section between the piano and oboe. The trio versions are strong simply because the contrasting timbres enable the musical ideas and imitation to be communicated more readily. Understand that the canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. This is a challenging music setting to engrave and prepare for print mainly because the score has so much detail which is not easy to represent with clarity on the sheet music page. Accompaniments are available as mp3 downloads featuring the violoncello and piano parts playing at 92, 96, 100 and 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This enables a clarinet player to incorporate ensemble playing into their practice routines. The accompaniments are recorded at 256kbps. Parts for the oboe and violoncello are appended to the full score.

Added: 2021-06-03 12:42:17

Study in Canon No.5 arr. two pianos

Debussy’s two piano arrangement of Schumann’s original version for pedal piano. The pedal piano was an instrument used by organists as a practice instrument. A quite vivid movement although one isn’t sure what Schumann’s original intention is endeavouring to describe although from the music view a march pattern is suggested both by the time signature and the musical ideas. The two piano version has a playback tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The tempo direction in the score is to play the movement “Not too fast.” A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No.5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. Understand that the canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. This is a challenging music setting to engrave and prepare for print mainly because the score has so much detail which is not easy to represent with clarity on the sheet music page. Accompaniments are available featuring the Piano 1 sounding on one side of the stereo channel and Piano 2 on the other. They play at 92, 96, 100 and 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute enabling the pianists to incorporate ensemble practice as part of their routine.

Added: 2021-06-03 12:34:49

Study in Canon No.5 Opus 56 arr. piano duet (Music for Piano Four Hands)

The piano duet or music for piano 4 hands version has a playback tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No. 5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. Understand that the canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. This is a challenging music setting to engrave and prepare for print mainly because the score has so much detail which is not easy to represent with clarity on the sheet music page. Accompaniments are available featuring the primo part sounding on one side of the stereo channel and the secondo on the other. They play at 92, 96, 100 and 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute enabling the pianists to incorporate ensemble practice as part of their routine.

Added: 2021-06-03 12:27:28

Study in Canon No.5 Opus 56 arr. organ

Robert Schumann’s Study in Canon No. 5 from his Opus 56 collection is a challenging movement to play and interpret. Whilst the music is quite vivid, the context is unclear in what is structurally a ternary form movement. The organ version has a playback tempo of 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the to the minute. The tempo direction in the score is to play the movement “Not too fast.” A canon arises in the description of a musical piece simply because musical ideas are imitated by another voice or instrument. It doesn’t necessarily describe the overall form or structure of a piece. The Study in Canon No. 5 is in three sections ABA’ with Section B beginning at bar 37 and the varied repeat of A at bar 83. The canonic element in Schumann’s time references all the musical elements and not just pitch: dynamics, articulation, ornamentation are all part of the canonic process. The crushed notes or acciaccaturas are a prominent musical feature. This is essentially a study in the articulation of short notes and occasional longer notes. Compositional process is evident from bar 49 where the canonic element involves inversion. There are some limitations regarding the range and choice of organ sounds in the realisation. Players should listen to performances on actual instruments available on streaming media.

Added: 2021-06-03 12:18:54

Study in Canon No. 1 arr. violin, violoncello and piano

Kirchner’s trio arrangements of Schumann's 6 Studies in Canon are an additional exploration of the textural and timbral element of Schumann’s original writing. The rhythmic detail requires some attention particularly with the tied notes across the bar line creating what are syncopated patterns. Pianists may well make of use the sustaining pedal, particularly in the section from bar 25, although its use is not indicated in the sheet in the sheet music score. There are some octave transpositions in the oboe part to keep to the instrument’s range. The trio realisation plays back at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The tempo indication is to play the movement “Not too quickly” which be played in quite a broad tempo range. In the video score, which can be found by clicking the YouTube link on the home page the ornaments have been written out to add clarity to what often is an ambiguous area. The PlentyMusic solution is not intended to be prescriptive but the suggestions are based on the best of current performance practice. The ornaments can be omitted and this is probably sensible when the movement is first being studied. Accompaniments are available from the PlentyMusic website in mp3 format that enable the violin player to explore the movement as an ensemble piece. Recorded at 256kbps quality they playback at 64, 68, 72, 76 and 80 quarter note beats to the minute. Schumann’s 6 Studies in Canon Opus 56 exist in several arrangements for many different instrument combinations and are well worth exploring particular as an introduction to chamber music playing.

Added: 2021-05-11 11:15:02

Study in Canon No. 1 arr. soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone and piano

Kirchner’s trio arrangements of Schumann's 6 Studies in Canon are an additional exploration of the textural and timbral element of Schumann’s original writing. The trio realisation plays back at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The tempo indication is to play the movement “Not too quickly” which be played in quite a broad tempo range. In the video score, which can be found by clicking the YouTube link on the PlentyMusic home page, the ornaments have been written out to add clarity to what often is an ambiguous area. The PlentyMusic solution is not intended to be prescriptive but the suggestions are based on the best of current performance practice. The ornaments can be omitted and this is probably sensible when the movement is first being studied. The rhythmic detail requires some attention particularly with the tied notes across the bar line creating what are syncopated patterns. Pianists may well make of use the sustaining pedal, particularly in the section from bar 25, although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. Accompaniments are available from the PlentyMusic website in mp3 format that enable the oboe player to explore the movement as an ensemble piece. Recorded at 256kbps quality they playback at 64, 68, 72, 76 and 80 quarter note beats to the minute. Schumann’s 6 Studies in Canon Opus 56 exist in several arrangements for many different instrument combinations and are well worth exploring particular as an introduction to chamber music playing.

Added: 2021-05-11 11:06:10

Study in Canon No. 1 arr. oboe, violoncello and piano

Kirchner’s trio arrangements of Schumann's 6 Studies in Canon are an additional exploration of the textural and timbral element of Schumann’s original writing. The rhythmic detail requires some attention particularly with the tied notes across the bar line creating what are syncopated patterns. Pianists may well make of use the sustaining pedal, particularly in the section from bar 25, although its use is not indicated in the sheet in the sheet music score. There are some octave transpositions in the oboe part to keep to the instrument’s range. The trio realisation plays back at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The tempo indication is to play the movement “Not too quickly” which be played in quite a broad tempo range. Kirchner’s trio arrangements of Schumann's 6 Studies in Canon are an additional exploration of the textural and timbral element of Schumann’s original writing. The trio realisation plays back at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The tempo indication is to play the movement “Not too quickly” which be played in quite a broad tempo range. In the video score, which can be found by clicking the YouTube link on the PlentyMusic home page, the ornaments have been written out to add clarity to what often is an ambiguous area. The PlentyMusic solution is not intended to be prescriptive but the suggestions are based on the best of current performance practice. The ornaments can be omitted and this is probably sensible when the movement is first being studied. The rhythmic detail requires some attention particularly with the tied notes across the bar line creating what are syncopated patterns. Pianists may well make of use the sustaining pedal, particularly in the section from bar 25, although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. Accompaniments are available from the PlentyMusic website in mp3 format that enable the oboe player to explore the movement as an ensemble piece. Recorded at 256kbps quality they playback at 64, 68, 72, 76 and 80 quarter note beats to the minute. Schumann’s 6 Studies in Canon Opus 56 exist in several arrangements for many different instrument combinations and are well worth exploring particular as an introduction to chamber music playing. The ornaments can be omitted and this is probably sensible when the movement is first being studied. Accompaniments are available from the PlentyMusic website in mp3 format that enable the oboe player to explore the movement as an ensemble piece. Recorded at 256kbps quality they playback at 64, 68, 72, 76 and 80 quarter note beats to the minute. Schumann’s 6 Studies in Canon Opus 56 exist in several arrangements for many different instrument combinations and are well worth exploring particular as an introduction to chamber music playing.

Added: 2021-05-11 10:45:51

Study in Canon No. 1 arr. clarinet in A, violoncello and piano

Kirchner’s trio arrangements of Schumann's 6 Studies in Canon are an additional exploration of the textural and timbral element of Schumann’s original writing. The trio realisation plays back at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The tempo indication is to play the movement “Not too quickly” which be played in quite a broad tempo range. In the video score, which can be found by clicking the YouTube link on the PlentyMusic home page, the ornaments have been written out to add clarity to what often is an ambiguous area. The PlentyMusic solution is not intended to be prescriptive but the suggestions are based on the best of current performance practice. The ornaments can be omitted and this is probably sensible when the movement is first being studied. Accompaniments are available from the PlentyMusic website in mp3 format that enable the clarinet in A player to explore the movement as an ensemble piece. Recorded at 256kbps quality they play back at 64, 68, 72, 76 and 80 quarter note beats to the minute. The rhythmic detail requires some attention particularly with the tied notes across the bar line creating what are syncopated patterns. Pianists may well make of use the sustaining pedal, particularly in the section from bar 25, although its use is not indicated in the sheet in the sheet music score. Schumann’s 6 Studies in Canon Opus 56 exist in several arrangements for many different instrument combinations and are well worth exploring particular as an introduction to chamber music playing.

Added: 2021-05-11 10:27:02

Study in Canon No.1 arr. clarinet in B flat, bass clarinet and piano

Kirchner’s trio arrangements of Schumann's 6 Studies in Canon are an additional exploration of the textural and timbral element of Schumann’s original writing. The trio realisation plays back at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The tempo indication is to play the movement “Not too quickly” which be played in quite a broad tempo range. In the video score, which can be found by clicking the YouTube link on the PlentyMusic home page, the ornaments have been written out to add clarity to what often is an ambiguous area. The PlentyMusic solution is not intended to be prescriptive but the suggestions are based on the best of current performance practice. The ornaments can be omitted and this is probably sensible when the movement is first being studied. Accompaniments are available from the PlentyMusic website in mp3 format that enable the clarinet in Bb player to explore the movement as an ensemble piece. Recorded at 256kbps quality they play back at 64, 68, 72, 76 and 80 quarter note beats to the minute. The rhythmic detail requires some attention particularly with the tied notes across the bar line creating what are syncopated patterns. Pianists may well make of use the sustaining pedal, particularly in the section from bar 25, although its use is not indicated in the sheet in the sheet music score. Schumann’s 6 Studies in Canon Opus 56 exist in several arrangements for many different instrument combinations and are well worth exploring particular as an introduction to chamber music playing.

Added: 2021-05-11 08:44:54

Study in Canon No.1 arr. Two Pianos

A movement with beauty, shape and a sense of space. The imitation principle is understandably strong in this work composed at a time that Schumann was intent on restoring rigour and contrapuntal discipline in his compositional approach. Whilst this music references the past there is a romantic twist or two in the harmonic language. A tempo of 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the realisation. Trills begin on the note and have been written out in the video score. Understand that the melodic and rhythmic shapes of the ornaments are constant throughout the whole movement. Schumann’s Canonic Studies were composed in 1845 for pedal piano and subsequently many other arrangements have been created. The two piano parts piano 1 and piano 2 can be also be downloaded as an mp3 accompaniment enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the piano 1 or piano 2. Piano 1 sounds on one side of the stereo channel and piano 2 part on the other. The accompaniments play at 64, 68, 72,76 and 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a 2 bar click beat before the music starts playing. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2021-05-11 07:42:39

First Movement Allegro from Sonata for Piano Duet in D K.381

The Sonata for Piano Duet in D K.381 was composed time between 1772-74 and was written for Mozart to play with his elder sister Nannerl. As a work it has been described as a reduction of an Italian symphony and is contemporary with his opera Lucio Silla K.135 composed when he was aged 16. The First Movement: Allegro is typically Mozartian both in spirit and musical content. The realisation plays back at 144 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. It is a very purposeful movement requiring light hands which is perhaps a musical element difficult to suggest in a realisation. The repeats although marked in the score are not played. There is plenty of opportunity for players to fine tune their playing of legato and staccato touches and to develop tremolo playing. The music editor favours a dry acoustic in recordings enabling clarity in the communication of the music. Accompaniments in mp3 format recorded at 256kbps which have a 4 bar count in are available at 120, 132 and 144 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. For those needing more information on how to play the ornaments refer to the video score on our YouTube channel where the ornaments have been written out to give clarity to what is a confusing area. When learning a movement it is often best to omit the ornamentation in the first instance.

Added: 2021-04-18 11:51:58

Second Movement Andante from Sonata for Piano Duet in D K381

A slow movement in the subdominant key of G requiring a legato piano touch with some occasional staccato articulations which are indicated in the music score. There is a some lovely sharing of the melodic material between the primo and secondo parts in this quite beautiful classical movement. A beautifully balanced movement from the point of view of musical texture. It is a two section AB binary movement although the repeats are not played in the realisation. Performers may wish to review the articulations suggested and if changes are made they do need to be made consistently and be in keeping with the style. Accompaniments are available at 52, 54, 56, 58, and 60 quarter note beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in, featuring the sound of the woodblock, with the first bar in eighth notes (quavers) and the second bar in quarter notes (crotchets). For those needing more information on how to play the ornaments refer to the video score on our YouTube channel where they have been written out to give clarity to what is often a confusing area. When learning a movement it is often best to omit the ornamentation in the first instance.

Added: 2021-04-17 08:51:11

Third Movement Allegro molto from Sonata for Piano Duet in D K381

The Sonata for Piano Duet in D K.381 was composed time between 1772-74 and was written for Mozart to play with his elder sister Nannerl. As a work it has been described as a reduction of an Italian symphony and is contemporary with his opera Lucio Silla K.135 composed when he was aged 16. The First Movement: Allegro is typically Mozartian both in spirit and musical content. The realisation plays back at 144 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. It is a very purposeful movement requiring light hands which is perhaps a musical element difficult to suggest in a realisation. The repeats although marked in the score are not played. There is plenty of opportunity for players to fine tune their playing of legato and staccato touches and to develop tremolo playing. The music editor favours a dry acoustic in recordings enabling clarity in the communication of the music. Accompaniments in mp3 format recorded at 256kbps which have a 4 bar count in are available at 120, 132, 138 and 144 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. For those needing more information on how to play the ornaments refer to the video score on our YouTube channel where the ornaments have been written out to give clarity to what is a confusing area. When learning a movement it is often best to omit the ornamentation in the first instance.

Added: 2021-04-17 08:37:14

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. trumpet in B Flat, trombone and piano

This version has been transposed down a semitone from the original key of B to Bb. T. Kirchner, arranged the six Schumann’s Studies in Canon expanding the original concept into music to be enjoyed by a chamber group. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with chromatic romantic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. The realisation plays back at 64 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo is marked adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills begin on the note. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Accompaniments are available enabling the trumpet in Bb player to explore and develop their ensemble skills. Four accompaniments are available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute. Do advise the Plenty Music Office if you are playing with a trombone and require just the piano sounding in the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-04-14 07:37:36

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. violin, violoncello and piano

T. Kirchner, arranged the six Schumann’s Studies in Canon expanding the original concept into music that can be enjoyed by a number of different instrument combinations. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with chromatic romantic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo is marked adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to on the trio video scores on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills begin on the note. The final chord should be spread evenly from the lowest to the highest sound in the piano part. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Accompaniments are available enabling the oboe player to explore and develop their ensemble skills. Four accompaniments are available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute. Do advise the Plenty Music Office if you are playing with a cellist and require just the piano sounding in the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-04-14 07:32:32

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. clarinet in A, violoncello and piano

T. Kirchner, arranged the six Schumann’s Studies in Canon expanding the original concept into music that can be enjoyed by a number of different instrument combinations. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with chromatic romantic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo marked adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to one of the video scores on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills begin on the note. The final chord should be spread evenly from the lowest to the highest sound in the piano part. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Accompaniments are available enabling the oboe player to explore and develop their ensemble skills. Four accompaniments are available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute. Do advise the Plenty Music Office if you are playing with a cellist and require just the piano sounding in the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-04-13 14:02:10

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. clarinet in B Flat, bass clarinet and piano

This version has been transposed down a semitone from the original key of B to Bb. T. Kirchner, arranged the six Schumann’s Studies in Canon expanding the original concept into music to be enjoyed by a chamber group. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with chromatic romantic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo is marked adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills begin on the note. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Accompaniments are available enabling the clarinet in Bb player to explore and develop their ensemble skills. Four accompaniments are available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute. Do advise the Plenty Music Office if you are playing with a bass clarinet and require just the piano sounding in the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-04-13 13:27:35

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone and piano

This version has been transposed down a semitone from the original key of B to Bb. T. Kirchner, arranged the six Schumann’s Studies in Canon expanding the original concept into music to be enjoyed by a chamber group. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with chromatic romantic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo is marked adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on our PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills begin on the note. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Accompaniments are available enabling the soprano saxophone player to explore and develop their ensemble skills. Four accompaniments are available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute. Do advise the Plenty Music Office if you are playing with a tenor saxophone and require just the piano sounding in the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-04-13 11:56:35

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. oboe, violoncello and piano

T. Kirchner, arranged the six Schumann’s Studies in Canon expanding the original concept into music that can be enjoyed by a number of different instrument combinations. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with chromatic romantic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo is marked adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills begin on the note. The final chord should be spread evenly from the lowest to the highest sound in the piano part. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Accompaniments are available enabling the oboe player to explore and develop their ensemble skills. Four accompaniments are available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute. Do advise the Plenty Music Office if you are playing with a cellist and require just the piano sounding in the accompaniment.

Added: 2021-04-13 11:51:15

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. two pianos

The Debussy arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon for Two Pianos are an exploration of Schumann’s original music from both the spatial and textural point of view. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in its style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with chromatic harmony of Schumann’s own time. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 returns to the mood and style of the first section although this section has both more contrast and drama. Schumann’s intention is to combine beauty of sound with a legato touch and it is important for pianists to aim for the best legato possible in their playing. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo marked as adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on out PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills in this time begin on the note. The final chord should be spread evenly from the lowest to the highest sound. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Accompaniments are available enabling pianists to explore and develop their ensemble skills. The piano 1 part sounds on one side of the stereo channel and piano 2 on the other. There are four accompaniments available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute.

Added: 2021-04-13 10:35:06

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. piano duet duet (music for piano four hands)

The piano duet arrangement of Schumann’s Studies in Canon by Bizet are hidden treasures in the repertoire. Bizet’s exploration of Schumann’s music adds to the composer’s original intention by exploring the musical texture in a broader musical space. This is a quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in its style and certainly in the first instance reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although with romantic chromatic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. Schumann’s original intention is to combine beauty of sound with a legato touch and it is important for pianists to aim for the best legato possible in their playing. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo is marked adagio in the score. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. Trills begin on the note. The final chord should be spread evenly from the lowest to the highest sound. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. Do explore the solo piano, piano duet, two piano and trio versions available on the PlentyMusic website. Accompaniments are also available enabling pianists to explore and develop their ensemble skills. The primo part sounds on one side of the stereo channel and the secondo part on the other. There are four accompaniments available in the tempo range from 58 to 64 quarter beats to the minute.

Added: 2021-04-13 06:31:41

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. piano

This quiet slow movement in reflective mood with a compositional approach that is vocal in its style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although presented with romantic harmony. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition. The final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. Schumann’s intention is to combine beauty of sound with a legato touch and it is important for pianists to aim for the best legato possible in their playing. The realisation plays back at 56 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo is marked adagio in the score. The challenge playing the piano version is simply managing the musical lines and imitation embraced in the texture. The music editor suggests playing through the separate lines of the score to gain understanding of the compositional process and points of imitation. This is a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. The final chord should be spread evenly from the lowest to the highest sound. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce intermediate level players to chamber music playing. It is quite understandable that other composers and arrangers have re-visited the Studies in Canon by Schumann, in a practical way, with arrangements for various instrument combinations. These arrangements encourage a clearer understanding of the contrapuntal aspects of the original composer’s writing. Do explore the organ, piano duet, two piano and trio versions available on the PlentyMusic website.

Added: 2021-04-13 06:25:04

Study in Canon No.6 Opus 56 arr. organ

This quiet slow movement in reflective mood is vocal in its style and reminiscent of Bach’s 4 part chorale writing although featuring chromatic harmony associated with the romantic era. The melody is not always in the top line and as in 4 part chorale writing it is the tenor line that often needs to be prominent. The first section is essentially a 4 part chorale featuring romantic chromatic harmony from Schumann’s own time rather than the diatonic harmony of Bach’s time. The second middle section is presented as a fugal exposition whilst the final section is introduced by a dotted rhythm as an upbeat in bar 32 and returns to the mood and style of the first section although this final section has more contrast and is more dramatic. Schumann’s intention is to combine beauty of sound with a legato touch and it is important for organists to aim for the best legato possible in their playing. The realisation plays back at 60 quarter note beats to the minute with the tempo indication in the score marked as adagio. This is an absorbing and challenging movement to with a particular challenge being to communicate the imitation that is evident in the music score. The music editor suggests playing through the separate lines of the score to gain understanding of the compositional process and points of imitation. This is also a challenging movement from the music reading point of view because of the chromaticism and tied notes and playing at a slow tempo. In the organ realisation two organ sounds have been used. For those wishing to see how the ornaments in the realisation are played refer to the video score on the PlentyMusicCo YouTube channel. Simply click the link on the PlentyMusic home page and search for the score. In the organ arrangement there is the possibility of adding an additional trill on the G# in bar 31. Trills begin on the note. There are many arrangements of this particular movement and the music editor suggests that along with Schumann’s other Studies in Canon they are ideal works to introduce players to chamber music playing. It is quite understandable that other composers and arrangers have re-visited the Studies in Canon by Schumann, in a practical way, with arrangements for various instrument combinations. These arrangements encourage a clearer understanding of the contrapuntal aspects of the original composer’s writing. Explore the solo piano, piano duet, two piano and trio versions available on the PlentyMusic website.

Added: 2021-04-13 06:16:16

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. tenor saxophone and piano and piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are typically found as the final movement of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 92 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are in this category. Legato playing is to be encouraged and solo instrument players need to consider how they play the sections where the piano accompaniment has the dominant musical material. There is opportunity to perhaps ornament and decorate the solo instrument line. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as compositions and a well documented and renowned performance legacy. Mp3 piano accompaniment files can be downloaded from the PlentyMusic website enabling solo instrument players to enjoy an ensemble music experience. Accompaniment 1 plays at 88 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 92 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 96, Accompaniment 4 plays at 100 and Accompaniment 5 at 104 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The accompaniments are recorded at 256 kbps which should enable them to be played through speakers in a performance context. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office if there is any feedback on this aspect of their use.

Added: 2021-01-27 14:36:35

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. soprano saxophone and piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are typically found as the final movement of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 92 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are in this category. Legato playing is to be encouraged and solo instrument players need to consider how they play the sections where the piano accompaniment has the dominant musical material. There is opportunity to perhaps ornament and decorate the solo instrument line. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as compositions and a well documented and renowned performance legacy. Mp3 piano accompaniment files can be downloaded from the PlentyMusic website enabling solo instrument players to enjoy an ensemble music experience. Accompaniment 1 plays at 104 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 100 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 96, Accompaniment 4 plays at 92 and Accompaniment 5 at 88 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The accompaniments are recorded at 256 kbps which should enable them to be played through speakers in a performance context. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office if there is any feedback on this aspect of their use.

Added: 2021-01-27 14:33:34

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. violoncello and piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are typically found as the final movement of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 92 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are part of this legacy. Legato playing is to be encouraged and solo instrument players need to consider how they play the sections where the piano accompaniment has the dominant musical material. There is opportunity to perhaps ornament and decorate the solo instrument line. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as compositions and a well documented and renowned performance legacy. Mp3 piano accompaniment files can be downloaded from the PlentyMusic website enabling solo instrument players to enjoy an ensemble music experience. Accompaniment 1 plays at 104 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 100 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 96, Accompaniment 4 plays at 92 and Accompaniment 5 at 88 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The accompaniments are recorded at 256 kbps which should enable them to be played through speakers in a performance context. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office if there is any feedback on this aspect of their use.

Added: 2021-01-26 13:53:24

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. bassoon and piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are typically found as the final movement of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 92 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are part of this legacy. Legato playing is to be encouraged and solo instrument players need to consider how they play the sections where the piano accompaniment has the dominant musical material. There is opportunity to perhaps ornament and decorate the solo instrument line. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as compositions and a well documented and renowned performance legacy. Mp3 piano accompaniment files can be downloaded from the PlentyMusic website enabling solo instrument players to enjoy an ensemble music experience. Accompaniment 1 plays at 104 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 100 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 96, Accompaniment 4 plays at 92 and Accompaniment 5 at 88 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The accompaniments are recorded at 256 kbps which should enable them to be played through speakers in a performance context. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office if there is any feedback on this aspect of their use.

Added: 2021-01-26 13:23:08

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. clarinet in Bb and piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are typically found as the final movement of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 96 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are part of this legacy. Legato playing is to be encouraged and solo instrument players need to consider how they play the sections where the piano accompaniment has the dominant musical material. There is opportunity to perhaps ornament and decorate the solo instrument line. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as compositions and a well documented and renowned performance legacy. Mp3 piano accompaniment files can be downloaded from the PlentyMusic website enabling solo instrument players to enjoy an ensemble music experience. Accompaniment 1 plays at 88 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 92 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 96, Accompaniment 4 plays at 100 and Accompaniment 5 at 104 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The accompaniments are recorded at 256 kbps which should enable them to be played through speakers in a performance context. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office if there is any feedback on this aspect of their use.

Added: 2021-01-26 13:06:06

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. oboe and piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are typically found as the final movement of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 96 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are part of this legacy. Legato playing is to be encouraged and solo instrument players need to consider how they play the sections where the piano accompaniment has the dominant musical material. There is opportunity to perhaps ornament and decorate the solo instrument line. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as compositions and a well documented and renowned performance legacy. Mp3 piano accompaniment files can be downloaded from the PlentyMusic website enabling solo instrument players to enjoy an ensemble music experience. Accompaniment 1 plays at 88 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 92 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 96, Accompaniment 4 plays at 100 and Accompaniment 5 at 104 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The accompaniments are recorded at 256 kbps which should enable them to be played through speakers in a performance context. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office if there is any feedback on this aspect of their use.

Added: 2021-01-26 12:52:15

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. flute and piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are typically found as the final movement of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 96 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are part of this legacy. Legato playing is to be encouraged and solo instrument players need to consider how they play the sections where the piano accompaniment has the dominant musical material. There is opportunity to perhaps ornament and decorate the solo instrument line. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as compositions and a well documented and renowned performance legacy. Mp3 piano accompaniment files can be downloaded from the PlentyMusic website enabling solo instrument players to enjoy an ensemble music experience. Accompaniment 1 plays at 88 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 92 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 plays at 96, Accompaniment 4 plays at 100 and Accompaniment 5 at 104 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The accompaniments are recorded at 256 kbps which should enable them to be played through speakers in a performance context. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office if there is any feedback on this aspect of their use.

Added: 2021-01-26 12:45:51

Rondeau from Sonata Concertata Opus 61 arr. solo piano

This movement is an arrangement of music that was originally composed for the violin and guitar. The third movement of Niccolo Paganini’s Sonata Concertata essentially has the form and mood of a rondo which are are typically found as the lasts movements of a concerto. This is an appealing uplifting joyful movement with challenges for both the solo player and accompanist. The realisation plays back at 96 dotted quarter notes to the minute and the movement can be performed in a tempo range from 88 to 104 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There is still much repertoire to be discovered and shared from existing music and Paganini’s compositions for violin and guitar are in this category. The sectional structure of the rondeau encourages good practice strategies and as the repetitive element is strong it makes it an ideal performance piece for the player seeking to gain experience and confidence in this aspect of their playing. The repeat of the first section has been retained in the realisation and music score but could be omitted in a performance. The use of the sustaining pedal is to encouraged in the accompanying piano part although pedal markings are not indicated in the score. So much can be learnt about playing difficult pieces by playing easy pieces and this movement is a case in point. This ensemble piece has been included in the PlentyMusic Concert Hall area of study. There is the option of slowing down at the end although this is probably only appropriate when the tempo is 100 or more beats to the minute. There are some lovely Spanish music references through the use of the phrygian mode in the section from bars 76 to bar 84. Paganini (1782 – 1840) is a unique and quite captivating figure in the history of music who influenced many romantic composers inspiring many to write for the piano as he did for the violin. His music and particularly his virtuoso approach has been the inspiration for compositions by many other composers including Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov amongst others. He was the outstanding violinist of his age and in addition was an excellent guitarist although his performances on this instrument were shared with friends rather than the public. He also left a teaching legacy as well as his compositions and a well-documented and renowned performance history.

Added: 2021-01-26 11:54:37

Thirds Right Hand Technical Drill

Technical Drill Right Hand Thirds: The letter names of the notes can be seen in the note heads which will useful in learning the note positions in this chromatic exercise. Why practice thirds? To strengthen the fingers - particularly the weaker 4th and 5th fingers. Practicing thirds is a very good way to develop legato playing. Thirds have a context in performance pieces and musical composition in general. Tips: Keep the fingers near to the keys. Understand: Imagine the weight of the hand goes downwards through the fingers and to the keys. How to practice: The play back tempo is 100 quarter notes beats to the minute but do not be afraid to start at a slower tempo. Play the right hand and left hand separately starting in different octave ranges of the keyboard or piano If the fingers and hands get tense - stop! Relax the hands and arms by your side and start again. Aim for legato playing (smooth - no gaps) and keep to the specified fingering. Remember: that for both the left hand and right hand fingering is the same in piano playing thumb = 1, index = 2, middle = 3, ring = 4 and 5 = the little finger Further Study: When you are confident with what you extend the exercise and give more work to the weaker fingers. Develop some rhythmic variants of the patterns. You can always record and send them as an an mp3 to PlentyMusic and these can perhaps be shared. Listen: Composers such as Chopin, Debussy, Rachmaninov and Kapustin have explored the intervals of a third in technical studies known as Etudes which exist as important and often challenging repertoire for the pianist.

Added: 2021-01-26 10:35:49

Thirds Left Hand Technical Drill

Technical Drill Left Hand Thirds: The letter names of the notes can be seen in the note heads which will helpful in learning the note positions in this chromatic exercise. Why practice thirds? To strengthen the fingers - particularly the weaker 4th and 5th fingers. Practicing thirds is a very good way to develop legato playing. Thirds have a context in performance pieces and musical composition in general. Tips: Keep the fingers near to the keys. Understand: Imagine the weight of the hand goes downwards through the fingers and to the keys. How to practice: The play back tempo is 100 quarter notes beats to the minute but do not be afraid to start at a slower tempo. Play the right hand and left hand separately starting in different octave ranges of the keyboard or piano. If the fingers and hands get tense - stop! Relax the hands and arms by your side and start again. Aim for legato playing (smooth - no gaps) and keep to the specified fingering. Remember: that for both the left hand and right hand fingering is the same in piano playing thumb = 1, index = 2, middle = 3, ring = 4 and 5 = the little finger. Further Study: When you are confident with what you extend the exercise and give more work to the weaker fingers. Develop some rhythmic variants of the patterns. You can always record and send them as an an mp3 to PlentyMusic and these can perhaps be shared. Listen: Composers such as Chopin, Debussy, Rachmaninov and Kapustin have explored the intervals of a third in technical studies known as Etudes which exist as important and often challenging repertoire for the pianist.

Added: 2021-01-26 09:10:09

Gigue en rondeau No.2 arr. organ

This is music worthy of attention and an excellent movement for a keyboard player keen to make progress. The repeating section has been written out simply for clarity as far as reading the music is concerned. In some editions there is a repeat of the opening 12 bar section but in performance this does rather spoil the symmetry of the movement. The music is presented in a plain score format with minimal score detail. Rameau was a leading French composer of both opera and harpsichord music and also known as a music theorist publishing a Treatise on Harmony in 1722. His music was largely out of fashion by the end of the 18th but there is a renewed interest in his music with recent performances and recordings. Interestingly he didn’t start composing opera until he was in his 50’s. He was one of the masters of 18th century French school of harpsichordists, publishing collections in 1706, 1724 and 1727. This particular movement comes from one of the suites from the 1724 collection. Whilst his keyboard music was intended for the harpsichord in more recent times it is frequently performed on the piano and there are transcriptions of movements available for the organ. The music editions available do generally relate to performances on the harpsichord and these generally have ornaments played in both hands which is something not so common in piano music. The rondeau is a form derived from early French poetry which was shared with the chanson (song form) in the medieval and Renaissance times. It features a repeating refrain (or chorus) and something in time that was adopted in both dance and instrumental forms. The form of this particular movement can be represented as ABACADA with A representing the repeating refrain or chorus. The fact that there are different numbers of bars in each of the phrases is most likely a connection to the poetry structure of earlier times. In the organ version which plays back at 96 dotted quarter notes to the minute the repeating refrain section is played on one manual whilst the sections described as episodes are played on a second manual or at least with a different registration. It is suggested that the pedal notes be played on a 16’ stop.

Added: 2021-01-15 09:57:59

Gigue en rondeau No.2 from the Suite in E minor

This is music worthy of attention and an excellent movement for a keyboard player keen to make progress. The repeating section has been written out simply for clarity as far as reading the music is concerned. In some editions there is a repeat of the opening 12 bar section but in performance this does rather spoil the symmetry of the movement. The music is presented in a plain score format with minimal score detail. Rameau was a leading French composer of both opera and harpsichord music and also known as a music theorist publishing a Treatise on Harmony in 1722. His music was largely out of fashion by the end of the 18th but there is a renewed interest in his music with recent performances and recordings. Interestingly he didn’t start composing opera until he was in his 50’s. He was one of the masters of 18th century French school of harpsichordists, publishing collections in 1706, 1724 and 1727. This particular movement comes from one of the suites from the 1724 collection. Whilst his keyboard music was intended for the harpsichord in more recent times it is frequently performed on the piano and there are transcriptions of movements available for the organ. The music editions available do generally relate to performances on the harpsichord and these generally have ornaments played in both hands which is something not so common in piano music. The rondeau is a form derived from early French poetry which was shared with the chanson (song form) in the medieval and Renaissance times. It features a repeating refrain (or chorus) and something in time that was adopted in both dance and instrumental forms. The form of this particular movement can be represented as ABACADA with A representing the repeating refrain. The fact that there are different numbers of bars in each of the phrases is most likely a connection to the poetry structure of earlier times. The piano version plays back at 96 dotted quarter notes to the minute. There are many recordings of this movement including one or two which are quite free in their interpretation particularly of the repeating refrain section turning it almost into an improvisation.

Added: 2021-01-15 09:51:13

Gigue en rondeau No.1 arr. organ

In a performance context the Gigue en rondeau No.1 would be followed by Gigue en rondeau No.2. The two Gigue en rondeau from Rameau’s Suite in E minor from his 1724 collection are excellent movements for a keyboard player to explore. The repeating sections have been written out simply for clarity as far as reading the music is concerned. In some editions there is a repeat of the opening 8 bar section but in a performance this does rather spoils the symmetry of the movement. The music is presented in a plain score format with minimal score detail and ornamentation has been deliberately omitted. Rameau was a leading French composer of both opera and harpsichord music and also known as a music theorist publishing a Treatise on Harmony in 1722. His music was largely out of fashion by the end of the 18th but there is a renewed interest in his music with recent performances and recordings. Interestingly he didn’t start composing opera until he was in his 50’s. He was one of the masters of 18th century French school of harpsichordists, publishing collections in 1706, 1724 and 1727. Whilst his keyboard music was intended for the harpsichord in more recent times it is frequently performed on the piano and there are transcriptions of many movements available for the organ. The music editions available do generally relate to performances on the harpsichord and these generally have ornaments played in both hands which is not something so common in piano music. The rondeau is a form derived from early French poetry which was shared with the chanson (song form) in the medieval and Renaissance times. It features a repeating refrain (or chorus) and something in time that was adopted in both dance and instrumental forms. The form of this particular movement can be represented as ABACA with A representing the repeating refrain or chorus. The organ version plays back at 84 dotted quarter notes to the minute.

Added: 2021-01-15 09:44:38

Gigue en rondeau No.1 from the Suite in E minor

In a performance context the Gigue en rondeau No.1 would be followed by Gigue en rondeau No.2. The two Gigue en rondeau from Rameau’s Suite in E minor from his 1724 collection are excellent movements for a keyboard player to explore. The repeating sections have been written out simply for clarity as far as reading the music is concerned. In some editions there is a repeat of the opening 8 bar section but in a performance this does rather spoils the symmetry of the movement. The music is presented in a plain score format with minimal score detail and ornamentation has been deliberately omitted. Rameau was a leading French composer of both opera and harpsichord music and also known as a music theorist publishing a Treatise on Harmony in 1722. His music was largely out of fashion by the end of the 18th but there is a renewed interest in his music with recent performances and recordings. Interestingly he didn’t start composing opera until he was in his 50’s. He was one of the masters of 18th century French school of harpsichordists, publishing collections in 1706, 1724 and 1727. Whilst his keyboard music was intended for the harpsichord in more recent times it is frequently performed on the piano and there are transcriptions of many movements available for the organ. The music editions available do generally relate to performances on the harpsichord and these generally have ornaments played in both hands which is not something so common in piano music. The rondeau is a form derived from early French poetry which was shared with the chanson (song form) in the medieval and Renaissance times. It features a repeating refrain (or chorus) and something in time that was adopted in both dance and instrumental forms. The form of this particular movement can be represented as ABACA with A representing the repeating refrain or chorus. The piano version plays back at 84 dotted quarter notes to the minute.

Added: 2021-01-15 09:41:04

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 arr. oboe, clarinet in A and piano

This is Kirchner's trio arrangement of Schumann's Study No.3 for pedal piano. An oboe substitutes for the violin and a clarinet in A for the violoncello. The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments which have been notated in full in the sheet music score although that appearing in the top line in bar 23 players may wish to omit. The performance practice of this movement the music editor suggests is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The violoncello part has been notated in the treble and bass clef. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing oboe part. the Primo or Secondo parts. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. There is no count in as the piano solo features in the introduction. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office by email if you would like to see more accompaniments for this movement adding a specification as far as tempo and instrumentation.

Added: 2021-01-11 11:25:09

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 arr. 2 clarinets in A and piano

This is Kirchner's trio arrangement of Schumann's Study No.3 for pedal piano. Two clarinets in A substitute for the violin and the violoncello. The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments which have been notated in full in the sheet music score although that appearing in the top line in bar 23 players may wish to omit. The performance practice of this movement the music editor suggests is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The violoncello part has been notated in the treble and bass clef. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the first clarinet in A part. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. There is no count in as the piano solo features in the introduction. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office by email if you would like to see more accompaniments for this movement adding a specification as far as tempo and instrumentation.

Added: 2021-01-11 11:20:45

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 arr. flute, clarinet in A and piano

This is Kirchner's trio arrangement of Schumann's Study No.3 for pedal piano. The flute substitutes for the violin and the clarinet in A for the violoncello. The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments which have been notated in full in the sheet music score although that appearing in the top line in bar 23 players may wish to omit. The performance practice of this movement the music editor suggests is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The violoncello part has been notated in the treble and bass clef. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the flute part. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. There is no count in as the piano solo features in the introduction. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office by email if you would like to see more accompaniments for this movement adding a specification as far as tempo and instrumentation.

Added: 2021-01-11 11:14:16

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 arr. clarinet in A, violoncello and piano

This is Kirchner's trio arrangement of Schumann's Study No.3 for pedal piano. The clarinet in A substitutes for the violin in this particular arrangement. The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments which have been notated in full in the sheet music score although that appearing in the top line in bar 23 players may wish to omit. The performance practice of this movement the music editor suggests is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The violoncello part has been notated in the treble and bass clef. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the clarinet in A part. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. There is no count in as the piano solo features in the introduction. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2021-01-11 10:54:12

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 arr. violin, violoncello and piano

This is Kirchner's trio arrangement of Schumann's Study No.3 for pedal piano. The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments which have been notated in full in the sheet music score although that appearing in the top line in bar 23 players may wish to omit. The performance practice of this movement the music editor suggests is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The violoncello part has been notated in the treble and bass clef. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the violin part. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. There is no count in as the piano solo features in the introduction. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2021-01-11 10:43:24

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 arr. flute, violoncello and piano

This is Kirchner's trio arrangement of Schumann's Study No.3 for pedal piano. The flute substitutes for the violin in this particular arrangement with some re-scoring of the fluteto keep to the instruments range. The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments which have been notated in full in the sheet music score although that appearing in the top line in bar 23 players may wish to omit. The performance practice of this movement the music editor suggests is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The violoncello part has been notated in the treble and bass clef. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the flute part. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. There is no count in as the piano solo features in the introduction. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office by email if you would like to see more accompaniments for this movement adding a specification as far as tempo and instrumentation.

Added: 2021-01-11 10:27:37

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 arr. oboe, violoncello and piano

This is Kirchner's trio arrangement of Schumann's Study No.3 for pedal piano. The oboe substitutes for the violin in this particular arrangement with some re-scoring of the oboe and violoncello part towards the end of the movement. The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments which have been notated in full in the sheet music score although that appearing in the top line in bar 23 players may wish to omit. The performance practice of this movement the music editor suggests is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The violoncello part has been notated in the treble and bass clef. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the oboe part. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. There is no count in as the piano solo features in the introduction. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players. Please advise the PlentyMusic Office by email if you would like to see more accompaniments for this movement adding a specification as far as tempo and instrumentation.

Added: 2021-01-11 10:02:32

Study in Canon No.3 Opus 56 Music for Piano 4 hands (Piano Duet)

The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments and for those that require clarity on how they should be played refer to the video score on our YouTube channel. The performance practice with this movement the music editor would suggest is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The music editor has avoided suggesting a rit at the end of the movement although in performance this is an option. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy whilst the piano trio arrangements of Kirchner provide additional repertoire and ensemble opportunities. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. The two bar count in features the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2021-01-10 16:25:25

Study in Canon No.3 arr. Two Pianos (4 hands)

The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The longer middle section of the Canon is in ABA (ternary) form. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. There are also some additional ornaments and for those that require clarity on how they should be played refer to the video score on our YouTube channel. The performance practice with this movement the music editor would suggest is at times ambiguous and at best inconsistent. The music editor has avoided suggesting a rit at the end of the movement although in performance this is an option. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composer’s keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy whilst the piano trio arrangements of Kirchner provide additional repertoire and ensemble opportunities. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) within a phrase as far as tempo is concerned. Some use of the sustaining pedal is suggested but it has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the violin parts. Accompaniment 1 plays at 80|100|80 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 plays at 76|90|76 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 72|84|72 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, and Accompaniment 4 at 68|80|68 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. The two bar count in features the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2021-01-10 13:50:16

Study in Canon Opus 56 No. 3 organ

The music opens and closes with an Andantino section that plays back at 72 quarter note beats to the minute while the section marked poco più mosso plays at 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. Both appoggiaturas (leaning notes) and acciaccaturas (crushed notes) feature as ornaments in the score. The texture can be described as a melody played as a canon and creating two voices, combined with an accompaniment figuration very typical of much of the composers keyboard music and a bass line. The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. Pianists can also explore the piano duet version of Georges Bizet and the two piano version by Claude Debussy whilst the piano trio arrangements of Kirchner offer excellent additional repertoire.When playing this music on the organ understand than it was composed for an instrument described as a pedal piano which had one keyboard with a pedal board. It was often used as a practice instrument by organists. It is possible to see one being played on YouTube.

Added: 2020-12-30 14:27:40

Study in Canon No. 2 violin, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this his original arrangement for violin, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. Parts for both violin and violoncello are appended to the full score. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 66 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the flute part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in featuring the sound of the woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-28 09:38:08

Study in Canon No. 2 soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. There are some octave transpositions in the soprano saxophone part to accommodate the range of the instrument. Parts for both saxophones appropriately transposed are appended to the full score. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays back at 63 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the soprano saxophone as a solo. The piano and tenor saxophone sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in at the beginning of the accompaniments.

Added: 2020-12-28 09:35:14

Study in Canon No. 2 soprano saxophone, baritone saxophone and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for soprano saxophone, baritone saxophone and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. There are some octave transpositions in the soprano saxophone part to accommodate the range of the instrument. Parts for both saxophones appropriately transposed are appended to the full score. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays back at 63 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the soprano part as a solo. The piano and baritone saxophone sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in at the beginning of the accompaniments.

Added: 2020-12-28 09:22:40

Study in Canon No. 2 oboe, bassoon and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for oboe, bassoon and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. There are some octave transpositions in the oboe part needed to keep to the range of the instrument and some minor re-scoring of the parts in bar 51. Parts for the oboe and bassoon are appended to the full score. The realisation plays back at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 66 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the oboe part as a solo. The piano and bassoon sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in utilising the sound of a woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-28 09:14:43

Study in Canon No. 2 clarinet in B Flat, bass clarinet and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb, bass clarinet and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. There are some octave transpositions in the flute part to accommodate the range of the instrument. Parts for the clarinet in Bb and bass clarinet appropriately transposed are appended to the full score. The music editor would like to hear from bass clarinet players as to the practicality of playing the low notes in the score. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 66 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the clarinet in Bb part as a solo. The piano and bass clarinet sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in at the beginning of the accompaniments.

Added: 2020-12-28 09:04:26

Study in Canon No. 2 flute, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for flute, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. There are some octave transpositions in the flute part to accommodate the range of the instrument. Parts for the flute and violoncello are appended to the full score. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 66 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the flute part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in at the beginning of the accompaniments.

Added: 2020-12-28 09:00:55

Study in Canon No. 2 clarinet in B Flat, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. There are some octave transpositions in the clarinet in Bb part to assist in keeping to the range of the instrument. Parts for the clarinet in Bb and violoncello are appended to the full score. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 63 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the oboe part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in featuring the sound of a woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-28 08:37:03

Study in Canon No. 2 oboe, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for oboe, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German term «Min innigen ausdruck » meaning with ‘heartfelt expression’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. There are some octave transpositions in the oboe part t needed to keep to the range of the instrument and some minor re-scoring of the parts in bar 51. Parts for the oboe and violoncello are appended to the full score. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are excellent pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 66 dotted quarter note beats to the minute notes to the with the occasional slowing down or rit. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the oboe part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 63 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 66 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 69 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in utilising the sound of a woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-28 08:29:17

Study in Canon No. 4 violin, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation simply because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for violin, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German word ‘Innig’ which means ‘heartfelt’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are perfect pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 72 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute in the first section from bar 1 to 19 and then 80 eighth notes for the remainder of the movement with the occasional slowing down or rit. The performance practice associated with the Study in Canon No. 4 also varies adding further interest to the music’s study. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. Managing the tempo through the playing of the whole piece is one of the challenges of a performance and more than one approach can be employed. The dynamic range is an additional aspect of the performance that can be explored. It is necessary to have an understanding of the strong chromatic element in the music which is particularly evident in the bass line and the chordal accompaniment. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. Players need to pay attention to the rhythmic detail and the chromatic detail. The mordents have been written out in the video score which can be viewed on our YouTube channel although symbols are used in the sheet music score. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The small decorative notes in the turns in bars 17, 19 and 65 do not sound in the video score or realisation. Instrument players will need to ensure that the reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate as the chromatic element is a strong feature There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. There are many recordings to explore of the trio arrangements and it would be well worth some time listening to a sample of the different versions that exist. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the violon part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute from bar 20. Accompaniment 2 plays at 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 3 plays at 76 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 4 plays at 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 88 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 5 plays at 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 92 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. There is a two bar eighth note (quaver) count in to the sound of a woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-14 17:28:41

Study in Canon No. 4 clarinet in B Flat, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation simply because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German word ‘Innig’ which means ‘heartfelt’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are perfect pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 72 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute in the first section from bar 1 to 19 and then 80 eighth notes for the remainder of the movement with the occasional slowing down or rit. The performance practice associated with the Study in Canon No. 4 also varies adding further interest to the music’s study. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. Managing the tempo through the playing of the whole piece is one of the challenges of a performance and more than one approach can be employed. The dynamic range is an additional aspect of the performance that can be explored. It is necessary to have an understanding of the strong chromatic element in the music which is particularly evident in the bass line and the chordal accompaniment. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. Players need to pay attention to the rhythmic detail and the chromatic detail. The mordents have been written out in the video score which can be viewed on our YouTube channel although symbols are used in the sheet music score. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The small decorative notes in the turns in bars 17, 19 and 65 do not sound in the video score or realisation. Instrument players will need to ensure that the reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate as the chromatic element is a strong feature There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. There are many recordings to explore of the trio arrangements and it would be well worth some time listening to a sample of the different versions that exist. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the clarinet in Bb part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute from bar 20. Accompaniment 2 plays at 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 3 plays at 76 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 4 plays at 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 88 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 5 plays at 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 92 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. There is a two bar eighth note (quaver) count in to the sound of a woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-14 17:16:47

Study in Canon No. 4 flute, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation simply because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for flute, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German word ‘Innig’ which means ‘heartfelt’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are perfect pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The playback score or realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 72 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute in the first section from bar 1 to 19 and then 80 eighth notes for the remainder of the movement with the occasional slowing down or rit. The performance practice associated with the Study in Canon No. 4 also varies adding further interest to the music’s study. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. Managing the tempo through the playing of the whole piece is one of the challenges of a performance and more than one approach can be employed. The dynamic range is an additional aspect of the performance that can be explored. It is necessary to have an understanding of the strong chromatic element in the music which is particularly evident in the bass line and the chordal accompaniment. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. Players need to pay attention to the rhythmic detail and the chromatic detail. The mordents have been written out in the video score which can be viewed on our YouTube channel although symbols are used in the sheet music score. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The small decorative notes in the turns in bars 17, 19 and 65 do not sound in the video score or realisation. Instrument players will need to ensure that the reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate as the chromatic element is a strong feature There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. There are many recordings to explore of the trio arrangements and it would be well worth some time listening to a sample of the different versions that exist. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the flute part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute from bar 20. Accompaniment 2 plays at 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 3 plays at 76 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 4 plays at 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 88 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 5 plays at 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 92 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. There is a two bar eighth note (quaver) count in to the sound of a woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-14 17:13:39

Study in Canon No. 4 oboe, violoncello and piano

Theodor Kirchner was a highly regarded musician, composer and arranger whose career sadly did not live up to expectation simply because of personal failings. The trio arrangements of Schumann’s Studies in Canon date from 1888. In this arrangement for oboe, violoncello and piano the imitative and canonic features of the music are very evident in the sharing of the lines between the instruments. The German word ‘Innig’ which means ‘heartfelt’ is used to describe the mood of the music at the beginning of the movement although the music editor has favoured the use of Italian terms in the score detail. The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are perfect pieces for the music student because they refererence music of the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are appealing to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The realisation is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. The texture is straightforward to understand in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 72 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute in the first section from bar 1 to 19 and then 80 eighth notes for the remainder of the movement with the occasional slowing down or rit. The performance practice associated with the Study in Canon No. 4 also varies adding further interest to the music’s study. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. Managing the tempo through the playing of the whole piece is one of the challenges of a performance and more than one approach can be employed. The dynamic range is an additional aspect of the performance that can be explored. It is necessary to have an understanding of the strong chromatic element in the music which is particularly evident in the bass line and the chordal accompaniment. In addition to Schumann’s the original composition for pedal piano there are many arrangements of the Opus 56 collection namely Georges Bizet’s for piano duet and Claude Debussy’s for two pianos. Players need to pay attention to the rhythmic detail and the chromatic detail. The mordents have been written out in the video score which can be viewed on the YouTube channel although symbols are used in the sheet music score. The use of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The small decorative notes in the turns in bars 17, 19 and 65 do not sound in the video score or realisation. Instrument players will need to ensure that the reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate as the chromatic element is a strong feature There is also opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. There are many recordings to explore of the trio arrangements and it would be well worth some time listening to a sample of the different versions that exist. The mp3 accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing the oboe part as a solo. The piano and violoncello sound in the accompaniment. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute from bar 20. Accompaniment 2 plays at 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 3 plays at 76 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 4 plays at 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 88 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 5 plays at 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 92 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. There is a two bar eighth note (quaver) count in to the sound of a woodblock.

Added: 2020-12-14 16:45:49

Study in Canon No. 4 arr. two pianos (4 hands)

The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are perfect pieces for the music student because they refer to the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and both ordered and appealing music to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than directly imitating or copying it. The realisation in the video score is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. Pianists should approach playing the Study in Canon No.4 with a lightness in the hands ensuring that there is clarity in their understanding of the musical texture. The texture is straightforward in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 72 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute in the first section from bar 1 to 19 and then 80 eighth notes for the remainder of the movement with the occasional slowing down or rit. The performance practice associated with the Study in Canon No. 4 also varies adding further interest to the music’s study. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. Managing the tempo through the playing of the whole piece is one of the challenges of a performance and more than one approach can be employed. The dynamic range is an additional aspect of the performance that can be explored. It is necessary to have an understanding of the strong chromatic element in the music which is particularly evident in the bass line and the chordal accompaniment. There is value in pianists playing through each of the lines to understand the imitation processes that are incorporated in the score. The music included in Robert Schumann’s Opus 56 collection has been arranged by Georges Bizet for piano duet and Claude Debussy for two pianos and in these arrangements the composing principles of canon and imitation aspects are much easier to explore. Players need to pay attention to the rhythmic detail and the chromatic detail. The mordents have been written out in the video score although the music editor suggests omitting the small decorative/ornamental notes in the early stages of learning the movement. The uses of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The small decorative notes in the turns in bars 17, 19 and 65 do not sound in the video score or realisation. Pianists will need to ensure that the reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate as the chromatic element in the movement is strong. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. Players may well wish to make use of the piano sustaining pedal although its use has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Piano 1 or Piano 2 part. The Piano 1 sounds on the one side of the stereo channel channel and the Piano 2 on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 2 plays at 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 3 plays at 76 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 88 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 4 plays at 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 90 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 5 plays at 84 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and 92 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. There is a two bar eighth note (quaver) count in to the sound of a woodblock. In a performance situation printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-12-05 11:21:03

Study in Canon No. 4 arr. organ

The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are perfect pieces for the music student because they refer to the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are ordered and appealing music to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style rather than directly imitating or copying it. The texture is straightforward in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 68 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute in the first section from bar 1 to 19 and then 72 eighth notes for the remainder of the movement with the occasional slowing down or rit. Managing the tempo through the playing of the whole piece is one of the challenges of a performance and more than one approach can be employed. The dynamic range is an additional aspect of the performance that can be explored. It is necessary to have an understanding of the strong chromatic element in the music which is particularly evident in the bass line and the chordal accompaniment. There is value in organists playing through the lines to understand the imitation processes that are incorporated in the score. The music included in Robert Schumann’s Opus 56 collection has been arranged by Georges Bizet for piano duet and Claude Debussy for two pianos and in these arrangements the composing principles of canon and imitation aspects are much easier to explore. Players need to pay attention to the rhythmic and chromatic detail. The mordents have been written out in the video score whilst the small decorative notes in bars 17, 19 and 65 do not sound. In the video score each line of music is associated with a stave and so the music is presented slightly differently to how it appears in the sheet music score. The video score plays at 72 quaver beats from bar 1 – 18 and and then in the piu mosso section at 80 eighth notes (quaver) to the minute. Organists will need to ensure that their reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate as the chromatic element in the movement is strong . There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned.

Added: 2020-12-04 15:04:42

Study in Canon No. 4 arr. piano 4 hands (piano duet)

The Studies in Canon Opus 56 of Schumann are perfect pieces for the music student because they refer to the past with the chromatic language of the romantic period and are ordered and appealing music to play. The Opus 56 collection can be appreciated on so many levels and the pieces exist in a number of different arrangements. This is music that re-invents J.S.Bach style than direct imitating or copying. The realisation in the video score is clearly not as nuanced as a live performance. Pianists should approach playing thee Opus 56 pieces with a lightness in the hands ensuring that there is clarity in their understanding of the musical texture. The texture is transparent in that there are two melodies exploring the canonic and imitative aspects of the music, a chordal accompaniment and a bass line. The realisation plays at 72 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute in the first section from bar 1 to 19 and then 80 eighth notes for the remainder of the movement with the occasional slowing down or rit. The performance practice associated with the Study in Canon No. 4 also varies adding further interest to the music’s study. The score detail in place in the sheet music score is particularly relevant to the tonal qualities of modern instruments. Managing the tempo through the playing of the whole piece is one of the challenges of a performance and more than one approach can be employed. The dynamic range is an additional aspect of the performance that can be explored. It is necessary to have an understanding of the strong chromatic element in the music which is particularly evident in the bass line and the chordal accompaniment. There is value in pianists playing through the lines to understand the imitation processes that are incorporated in the score. The music included in Robert Schumann’s Opus 56 collection has been arranged by Georges Bizet for piano duet and Claude Debussy for two pianos and in these arrangements the composing principles of canon and imitation aspects are much easier to explore. Players need to pay attention to the rhythmic detail and the chromatic detail. The mordents have been written out in the video score although the music editor suggests omitting the small decorative/ornamental notes in the early stages of learning the movement. The uses of the sustaining pedal whilst recommended has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The small decorative notes in the turns in bars 17, 19 and 65 do not sound in the video score or realisation. In the video score each line of music is associated with a stave and so the music is presented slightly differently to how it appears in the sheet music score. The video score plays at 72 quaver beats from bar 1 – 18 and and then in the piu mosso section at 80 eighth notes (quaver) to the minute. Pianists will need to ensure that the reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate as the chromatic element in the movement is strong . There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and take (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. Players may well wish to make use of the piano sustaining pedal although its use has not been indicated in the sheet music score. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the primo or secondo part. The primo part sounds on the one side of the stereo channel channel and the secondo on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 68 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 2 plays at 72 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 3 plays at 76 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 88 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 4 plays at 80 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 90 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute.Accompaniment 5 plays at 82 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute in the first section and then 92 eighth (quaver) note beats to the minute. There is a two bar eighth note (quaver) count in to the sound of a woodblock. In a performance situation printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-12-03 13:09:42

Scarborough Fair arr. flute & piano

An arrangement for flute and piano of this popular English folk song in the dorian mode. The realisation plays at 50 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute. The melody section is repeated 4 times by the solo instrumentalist and it is the piano accompaniment that is varied for each verse. The arrangement has been designed very much to build confidence in solo playing working alongside a competent accompanist. Texturally the music is quite sparse which helps give it a haunting quality. The accompanist may wish to add some sustaining pedal although this has not been indicated in the score. The lyrics for the song are well worth a read through because they identify many of the challenges of modern living despite having their origins in the English ballad culture of many centuries ago. A flute part is appended to the full score. The three accompaniment options have tempi of 1) 150 2) 144 and 3) 138 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute which can be alternatively looked at as being 1) 50 2) 48, and 3) 46 dotted half notes (minims) to the minute. If you are confused the music editor understands completely but the best advice is to play with a one to a bar feel.

Added: 2020-11-18 10:30:04

Study in Canon No. 2 arr. piano 4 hands (piano duet)

Composed in the key In the key A minor this movement in ABA ternary form has a haunting quality. The realisation plays back at 66 dotted quarter notes to the minute. The voice leading particularly in the two top lines of the organ solo is often quite difficult to follow and that is why the piano duet version arranged by Bizet and the two piano version arranged by Debussy are well worth exploring. The music editor suggests slow practice in the first instance to ensure that the reading of the notes and accidentals is accurate. Chromaticism is a strong feature of this movement. There is opportunity to explore tempo rubato in a performance. In romantic music this refers to the give and as far (speeding up and slowing down) as far as tempo is concerned. There is a substantial amount of score detail in the sheet music scores particularly in respect to the articulation of notes. Players may well wish to make use of the piano sustaining pedal although its use has not been indicated in the sheet music score. In temperament, Schumann was quite insecure and the Studies in Canon perhaps reflect the need for a himto reacquaint himself with the discipline of counterpoint. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 72 dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 69 dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 66 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 63 quarter note beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in with the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-11-07 13:36:26

Study in Canon No.2 arr. Two Pianos (4 hands)

Composed in the key In the key A minor this movement in ABA ternary form has a haunting beautiful quality. Debussy has created an arrangement which has beauty, shape and a sense of space. Debussy probably better than any other communicates the elements of the canonic study in his two piano arrangement of this movement creating the space and texture to communicate the details of the canon. Some of the detail of the scoring is different to Schumann’s original version for pedal piano. It is very interesting that other composers have re-visited Schumann’s Studies in Canon Opus 56 namely Bizet and Debussy. Tempo rubato is a musical element that could be explored in a performance although it has not been used in the realisation. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Piano I or Piano II parts. The Piano I part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and Piano II on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 69 dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 66 dotted quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 63 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 60 quarter note beats to the minute. There is a two bar count in with the sound of a woodblock. As the music is in 12/8 time the music editor suggests that players should familiarise themeselves with this. In a performance situation printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-11-04 10:01:30

Study in Canon No. 2 Opus 56 for organ

The Studies in Canon Opus 45 date from 1845 and were composed when the composer was focused on developing contrapuntal discipline in his writing. The voice leading particularly in the two top lines of the organ solo is often quite difficult to follow and that is why the piano duet version arranged by Bizet and the two piano version arranged by Debussy are well worth exploring. Schumann was quite an insecure individual both in himself and in his abilities as a composer. The reason for this is both can be understood by knowing that in that his original ambition was to be a pianist and secondly that a very overbearing father-in-law. There is added significance in the observation that this scond movement Opus 56 movement is 56 bars long. Schumann had an obsession with puzzles particularly mathematical ones. When playing this music on the organ understand than it was composed for an instrument described as a pedal piano which had one keyboard which was often used as a practice instrument by organists. Unsurprisingly, in music composed for this instrument with just one keyboard there is opportunity to share parts between the hands in some sections. The realisation plays back at 66 dotted quarter notes (crotchet) beats to the minute. From the music setting point of view this is quite a challenging piece particularly sorting out the two top voices which often are together in the same clef. For the player separating the voices by playing stems up for one voice and stems down for another offers clarity in understanding of the parts.

Added: 2020-11-04 08:28:46

Mi-a-ou from the Dolly Suite Opus 56 arr piano 4 hands (piano duet)

Mi-a-ou is the second movement of the Dolly Suite Opus 56 which was originally published as a piano duet. The realisation score plays back at a tempo of 72 dotted half beats (minim) beats to the minute although there is a slower section towards the end of the movement. The tempo needs to be brisk but controlled. Some use of the sustaining pedal to communicate the range of the harmonic colour is recommended in one or two sections but is not indicated in the sheet music score. The writing is very pianistic in the sense that there are not too many technical difficulties and the chords fall nicely for the fingers. Rehearsal markings are in place in the score. Duettists will need to play with a lightness in the hands and there needs to be clarity in the articulation of the melodic ideas. Fauré as a composer is capable of writing music that has great appeal for both player and audience. The rhythmic detail is always interesting and the combination of a chromatic harmony with the add reference to the modal past gives the music a modern context. There are many recordings from both recent times and the recording archive which are worth exploring. The two piano parts Primo and Secondo can be downloaded as mp3 accompaniments enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo part The Primo part sounds on the right channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the left channel. Accompaniment 1 plays at 76 dotted half notes to the minute beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 69 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a 4 bar click beat before the music starts playing to give a clear pulse to players. The accompaniments have been recorded at a bit rate 256 kbps. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players. The accompaniments will be uploaded in the next few days.

Added: 2020-11-04 08:08:53

Kitty-Valse from the Dolly Suite Opus 56 for piano 4 hands (piano duet)

Kitty-Valse is the fourth movement of the Dolly Suite Opus 56 originally published as a piano duet. The music needs to be played with a light one in a bar feel. Fauré as a composer is capable of writing music that has great appeal for both player and audience. The rhythmic detail is always interesting and the combination of a chromatic harmony with the added reference to the modal past gives the music a modern context. There are many recordings from both recent times and the recording archive which are worth exploring. The video score plays back at a tempo of 69 dotted half beats is the fourth movement of the (minim) beats to the minute. Some use of the sustaining pedal to communicate the range of the harmonic colour is recommended but is not indicated in the sheet music score. The realisation is possibly lacking in a lightness of touch that the music editor suggests is needed. Duettists will need to play with a lightness in the hands which is not altogether suggested in the playback of the video score. Additionally, there is probably a context for tempo rubato when playing this movement. The two piano parts primo and secondo can be downloaded as accompaniments enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the primo or secondo part The primo part sounds on one side of the stereo signal and the secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 69 dotted half notes (minim) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 66 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute Accompaniment 3 at 63 dotted half note beats (mimim) to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 60 dotted minim beats. There is a 4 bar click beat before the music starts playing to give a clear pulse to players. The accompaniments have been recorded at a bit rate 256 kbps. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-11-04 07:53:03

Rondo: Second Movement from Sonata in D for Opus 6 for piano four hands (piano duet)

The Sonata in D for piano four hands Opus 6 was published in 1797. A rondo is a piece with a recurring theme and typically used as a last movement by Beethoven in his sonatas and concertos. They frequently contain music and melodic ideas that express the composer’s sunnier and uplifting side. Sheet music and accompaniments link: coming soon The Rondo from Opus 6 offers a great opportunity for pianists to develop their ensemble playing skills. The playback tempo in the video score is 112 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The sustaining pedal can and should be used in a performance although it has not been indicated in the score. Clarity in the articulation of the musical ideas is essential in a successful performance and the contrast between legato and staccato playing can be explored to the full in a performance. Beethoven’s music always has clear harmonic direction and a strong sense of drama. He is also great one for exploring musical form and the dynamic element of music and these elements are evident in what is a relatively early published work. In the video score the ornaments are written out in full. There is always great clarity of intention in the composer’s compositional approach. Accents in Beethoven’s music are quite often placed on the weaker beats of the bar to which help gives his music its characteristic restlessness. Maintaining the rhythmic independence of the musical lines is an important consideration in a performance of the movement. The loud going to soft marking fp is a very characteristic Beethoven score marking. sf in the music score indicates what is known as a forzando or a forceful accent. In the video score the ornaments have also been written out in full. The score layout is ideal for auditioning the movement as a video although the sheet music scores from the PlentyMusic website have Primo and Secondo parts separated onto different pages as is the convention for piano duets. The primo and secondo parts can be downloaded separately as “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the primo or secondo parts. The primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the secondo part sounds on the other. The tempos are as follows in quarter note beats to the bar Accompaniment 1 plays at 116 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 112 quarter note (crotchet) note beats Accompaniment 3 at 108 quarter note (crotchet) note beats and Accompaniment 4 at 104 quarter note (crotchet) note beats. There is a four bar count in /click introduction on the accompaniment mp3 files which are recorded at 256kbps.When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players. It is a good idea for players to use a metronome in their preparation.

Added: 2020-11-02 16:43:59

Soirée Polka arr. for piano four hands (piano duet)

Foster’s “ Soirée Polka” is an appealing and rhythmic piece suited to being played by a wide range of instruments and instrumental groups although the musical material needs to be played with a lightness of touch. A tempo of 108 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the playback score. The polka is a lively folk dance full of character originating from the area now known as Czechia (Bohemia). Its popularity spread widely throughout Europe and subsequently North and South America. The dance is upbeat and celebratory in character and written in 2/4 time. Stephen Foster (1826-1864) is known as the “father of American music,” responsible for writing over 200 songs many of which are still very well known today. His “My Old Kentucky Home” has been the official state song of Kentucky since 1928. He began composing as a teenager and attempted to live his life as a professional songwriter at a time before copyright laws protected a composer’s work so it was impossible for him to earn a decent living. There are a number of variants of this piece in existence so don’t be concerned if you familiar with a slightly different version. The two piano parts primo and secondo can be downloaded separately as mp3 accompaniments enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the primo or secondo part. The primo part sounds on one side of the stereo channel and the secondo part on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 108 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute, Accompaniment 3 at 100 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 96 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute.There is a 4 bar click beat before the music starts playing to give a pulse and tempo indication for players. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-11-02 14:17:31

Study in Canon No.1 Opus 56 arr. organ

A movement with beauty, shape and a sense of space. The imitation principle is understandably strong in a work composed, at a time that Schumann was intent on restoring rigour and confidence to his own compositional process. For players a secure and even technique is needed to play this relatively short movement. Whilst this music references the past there is a romantic twist or two in the harmonic language. A tempo of 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the organ realisation. Trills begin on the note and the pattern is shown in the ossia stave in bar 7 where the trill is notated. Understand that the melodic and rhythmic shapes of the ornaments need to be played consistently throughout the movement. The trills do not sound in the organ realisation. Schumann’s Canonic Studies were composed in 1845 for pedal piano and subsequently arranged for piano duet / piano four hands by Georges Bizet. There are also other versions for solo piano, two pianos and string quartet.

Added: 2020-10-02 09:08:03

Keyboard Sonata in D minor K.417

The Keyboard Sonata in D minor K.417 is a Fuga and can be performed on either the harpsichord, organ or piano and is believed to date from 1754. It is composed in a style that refences the past and the notation in long notes imitates the style of writing associated particularly with the polyphonic lines of church music. It has some beautiful soaring lines and is a great piece of music for both the player and listener. Domenico Scarlatti did not compose many fugues and whilst he worked in relative isolation his compositional approach anticipates and looks to the future rather than the past. His father, Alessandro was the one more inclined to compose fugues. The organ realisation plays back at 84 half note beats to the minute. Domenico Scarlatti although born in Italy spent most of his working life employed by the Royal Courts in Portugal and Spain working as a musician, composer and teacher particularly of members of the royal household. His contribution to the repertoire are his 550+ keyboard sonata most of which are very inventive pieces in AB binary form. Little of his music was published in his own lifetime.

Added: 2020-09-07 09:04:07

Duet No.2 in F BWV 803 (Piano)

The Duet in F BWV 803 was published in 1739 being one of 4 Duettos. The sheet music copy available from the PlentyMusic website has suggested fingering in place and the cadential ornamentation is written out. The second duet in F major BWV 803 is a fugue written in the form of a da capo aria ABA. The 4 Duets are part of Clavier-Übung III or the German Organ Mass and composed really at the zenith of the composer’s contrapuntal writing. The edited music score has suggested fingering in place which should serve as a useful guide in the first instance. The music editor’s concept is that once familiarised with the movement players will default to the plain score perhaps substituting their own choice of fingering when they feel it is appropriate.The tempo of the piano realisation and video score is 96 quarter note beats (crotchet) beats to the minute. A piece when played on the piano with energy and purpose that really can/does come alive. This is quite stunning contrapuntal music composed when J.S. Bach was at the top of his form. A very delicate almost paintbrush stoke is required particularly in the B section but an awareness of how to use weight in the hands is also most applicable in the A section. It is becoming one of the music editors most absorbing pieces to play and listen to simply because it explores so many aspects of articulation and performance and yet the conception is in just two parts. Pianists need to have a Lightness in the hands and touch needs to be explored at all times.

Added: 2020-09-07 08:51:45

Sinfonia No.12 in A BWV 798 (Organ)

The Sinfonias of J.S. Bach are three voiced works and can be played on either the harpsichord, piano or organ. There are 15 in the collection all of which explore contrapuntal writing to the full. Bach’s intention was to prepare students for composition and a cantabile style of playing. The autograph copy of the Sinfonia’s is dated 1723. The organ realisation plays back at a tempo of 80 quarter note beats to the minute. The Two Part Inventions and Sinfonias are essential repertoire for all keyboard players and not a bad introduction to playing Bach on the organ. They are ideal “warm up” pieces.

Added: 2020-09-07 07:45:28

Two Part Invention No.8 in F BWV 779 (Organ)

Invention No.8 in F is a busy uplifting movement requiring a good technique and level of musicianship to be played accurately and at a consistent tempo. The imitative counterpoint is a strong feature and the notes and shapes need to be clearly articulated. A tempo of 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the organ realisation and video score. Right and left hand fingering is clearly specified in the sheet music download although feedback to the music editor on the placement of fingering would be appreciated. Over, under or to the side of the note? The Two Part Inventions and Sinfonias are essential repertoire for all keyboard players and a very good introduction to playing Bach on the organ.

Added: 2020-09-07 07:35:04

Fugue in G minor

There are recordings of this work played on the piano, organ and harpsichord of this fine 4 part fugue now attributed to Gottlieb Muffat. Gottlieb Muffat (1690 – 1770) the son of George Muffat was a court organist and composer in Vienna becoming first organist on the accession of Maria Theresa to the throne in 1741. His compositional output mostly comprises keyboard music although much of it was not published. Toccatas, fugues, ricerare, canzonas and suites are to be found in his music collections and Handel often borrowed and reworked Muffat’s music. Muffat was a fine contrapuntist although a conservative approach is evident in his writing. This piece is often attributed to G. Frescobaldi. The chromatic element of this movement makes it a challenge to read and to complicate matters performances and sheet music copies of the music do vary in their detail. Players need to study the score carefully because at times the musical lines have conflicting accidentals. This is explained by the composer referencing the modes that originate in music from earlier times that createwhat are known as “false relations.” There is an arrangement by Bartok of this Fugue for piano although at the time ihe understood it to be a work by Frescobaldi. There need to be clarity in the articulation of the lines particular when the fugal entries are made. A tempo in the range 72 – 84 quarter note beats to the minute is suggested whilst in the realisation and video score play back at 80 quarter note beats to the minute. One of the challenges for the player is deciding which hand plays which notes in the middle voices. The music editor will upload an edited music score to the website in the future. Players also need to communicate an awareness of the musical texture in their playing. The trills begin on the note and modern performances often features additional ornaments although the music editor advises caution and consistency in their use. There are strong rhythmic motifs in the fugue and any ornamentation should not detract from the composer’s intention. There are performances that suggest that the performance practice for music of this period is not as secure as music from more well researched times. Another challenge for musicians is understanding the pitch element in the music of the period. The tuning fork was invented in 1711 and the suggestion is that the pitch standard during the Baroque period was roughly a semitone layer than modern standard pitch of A4 = 440Hz. A4 in the Baroque period was = 415Hz although pitch levels did vary around Europe. The chromatic element is a particular feature and there is a unifying downwards chromatic line that appears a number of times.

Added: 2020-09-07 07:15:00

Duet No.2 in F BWV 803

The Duet in F BWV 803 was published in 1739 being one of 4 Duettos. The sheet music copy available from the PlentyMusic website has suggested fingering in place and the cadential ornamentation is written out. The second duet in F major BWV 803 is a fugue written in the form of a da capo aria ABA. The 4 Duets are part of Clavier-Übung III or the German Organ Mass and composed really at the zenith of the composer’s contrapuntal writing. The edited music score has suggested fingering in place which should serve as a useful guide in the first instance. The music editor’s concept is that once familiarised with the movement players will default to the plain score perhaps substituting their own choice of fingering when they feel it is appropriate. The organ realisation and video score keeps to the same registration but in a performance there is opportunity to change the registration in the middle B section. The organ realisation plays back at 84 quarter note beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-09-07 07:00:57

Canzona in F

A very attractive piece for organ or harpsichord just 56 bars in length but featuring strong musical shapes that explores the full range of the organ manual. A tempo in the range 84 – 96 quarter note beats to the minute is suggested with the realisation playing back at 84 quarter note beats to the minute. The movement can be played on a one manual instrument with an 8 foot stop suggested as an appropriate registration. Imitation, the use of sequence and repetition are compositional processes that feature with the full range of the keyboard being explored. The descending musical shapes and motifs need to be clearly articulated particularly at the beginning of phrases. There are 12 ornaments indicated in the score. The upper mordent note /note above/note is used on short notes while the trill is in place on notes a quarter note (crotchet) in length. As the movement progresses the texture becomes more complex and ornaments become less evident in the score. The video score which can be viewed on the YouTube channel has all the ornaments written out whilst the sheet music score has symbols in place. Ornamentation in music performance is a complex topic and additional ornaments could be added at important cadence points. The music editor argues the case for clarity and simplicity suggesting that ornaments are added when the movement can be played competently. Note that rests in silent voices are used rather inconsistently. The music editor has found recordings of this music where it has been attributed to A. Scarlatti. As music was hand copied and often shared between teachers and pupils this is a frequent occurrence in music from these early times. Domenico Zipoli (1688-1726) was an Italian Baroque composer who lived and worked as a Jesuit priest in South America. Born in Prato, near Florence he studied with Alessandro Scarlatti and Bernardo Pasquini and in Rome produced in 1716 a collection of keyboard pieces titled Sonate d’intavolatura per organo e cimbalo which includes this particular canzona. This music is still highly regarded and playable by an intermediate level player.

Added: 2020-08-27 08:29:24

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. solo piano

In this arrangement for solo piano of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 (by the composer) the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 144 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging.

Added: 2020-08-26 17:52:55

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. violoncello & piano

In this arrangement for violoncello with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 144 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126. The numbers simply refer to the number of quarter note/crotchet beats to the minute referencing the ABA structure. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you. The small ornamental notes do not sound in the arrangement although they have been retained in the sheet music score. The music editor suggests that they are probably best omitted certainly in the early stages of learning the piece and possibly altogether for those instruments sounding in the bass clef.

Added: 2020-08-26 15:28:31

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. violin & piano

In this arrangement for violin with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 150 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126. The numbers simply refer to the number of quarter note/crotchet beats to the minute referencing the ABA structure. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you. The small ornamental notes that sound in the realisation are probably best omitted certainly in the early stages of learning the piece.

Added: 2020-08-26 14:15:25

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. bassoon & piano

In this arrangement for bassoon with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 144 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126.The numbers simply refer to the number of quarter note/crotchet beats to the minute referencing the ABA structure. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you. The small ornamental notes do not sound in the arrangement although they have been retained in the sheet music score. The music editor suggests that they are probably best omitted certainly in the early stages of learning the piece and possibly altogether for those instruments sounding in the bass clef.

Added: 2020-08-26 14:03:03

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. tenor saxophone & piano

In this arrangement for tenors saxophone with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 144 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126. The numbers simply refer to the number of quarter note/crotchet beats to the minute referencing the ABA structure. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you. The small ornamental notes do not sound in the arrangement although they have been retained in the sheet music score. The music editor suggests that they are probably best omitted certainly in the early stages of learning the piece.

Added: 2020-08-26 13:58:05

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. soprano saxophone & piano

In this arrangement for soprano saxophone with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 144 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126.ture. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you. The acciaccatura or crushed note do not sound in bar 20 and bar 116. Instrumentalists may well review the playing of the small ornamental notes and leave them out entirely although they have been retained in the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-08-26 13:41:04

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 150 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126. The numbers simply refer to the number of quarter note/crotchet beats to the minute referencing the ABA structure. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you. The acciaccatura or crushed note do not sound in bar 20 and bar 116. Instrumentalists may well review the playing of the small ornamental notes and leave them out entirely although they have been retained in the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-08-26 13:27:55

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. oboe & piano

In this arrangement for oboe with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 144 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126. The numbers simply refer to the number of quarter note/crotchet beats to the minute referencing the ABA structure. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you. The acciaccatura or crushed note do not sound in bar 20 and bar 116. Instrumentalists may well review the playing of the small ornamental notes and leave them out entirely although they have been retained in the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-08-26 13:00:31

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 arr. flute & piano

In this arrangement for flute with piano accompaniment of Moszkowski’s Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 the realisation plays back at 135 quarter note (crotchet) beats a minute in the first and last A section and 150 in the middle B section. The first section could be played at a slower or quicker tempo and likewise the middle section. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel and features the triplet figuration that is so characteristic of Spanish music. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music whilst the melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections are in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Octave transpositions are in place where appropriate and chord voicings in the accompaniment have been occasionally edited. The melody is also presented as a single note line. Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly, the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for performance in the early 20th century drawing room. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. Piano accompaniments are available playing at the following tempi (1) 144/144/144 (2) 138/150/138 (3) 135/144/135 (4)126/138/126. The numbers simply refer to the number of quarter note/crotchet beats to the minute referencing the ABA structure. If you require a more bespoke accompaniment please advise the PlentyMusic office and we will create and upload it for you.

Added: 2020-08-26 12:57:00

None but the Lonely Heart arr. organ solo

Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it a challenging performance piece. The melody needs to be played on the swell or choir manual and the accompaniment using a quiet registration on the great. The pedal part can also be coupled to the great. In any transcription or score reduction compromises have to be made. The repeating elements do add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which the organist will need to take into consideration in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing a controlled tone in solo playing. The off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry for the original song was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness.

Added: 2020-08-17 12:35:21

Spanish Dance No. 2 Opus 12 for piano duet (piano 4 hands)

A tempo of 50 dotted quarter note beats to the minute is appropriate if players wish to play the movement at one tempo. Another approach is to take the opening and closing section and play those slightly slower than the middle B section. Both approaches are quite valid. The movement needs to be played with a one in a bar feel. Players should endeavour to communicate the charm and intimacy of the music. The melody and accompaniment need to be articulated with clarity and consistency. The movement is in ABA ternary form and has a regular 8 bar phrase structure. In fact each of the main sections is in ternary form so analysis of the movement reveals a structure that can be represented as A (a b a) B (c d c) A (a b a). Tempo rubato is something that can be embraced in a performance but has not been used in the realisation and playback. Similarly the sustaining pedal can be used although its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. The slowing downs that feature at the end of phrases are also not marked in the score. This is music intended for the drawing room and composed at a time when the playing of piano duets was a very popular pastime. The triplet figuration so characteristic of Spanish music is a strong feature in this movement. This colourful movement exists in several chamber and orchestral arrangements. Moszkowski is a composer whose brilliant piano pieces in particular are worthy of attention although much of the music is technically very challenging. The mp3 accompaniment downloads from the PlentyMusic website enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 150/135/150, Accompaniment 2 plays 144/144/144, Accompaniment 3 at 138/150/138, Accompaniment 4 at 135/150/135 and Accompaniment 5 at 135/144/135 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute If pianists require accompaniments with different tempi then please advise the PlentyMusic office. There is a four bar count that features the sound of two pitches of a woodblock. If not using an iPad or notebook, when performing PlentyMusic scores printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players. Moritz Moszkowski (1854 – 1925) was a German composer of Polish – Jewish descent who was an exceptional pianist and well known at the end of the 19th century as a concert pianist, conductor, composer and teacher. He was also a competent violinist. He composed many small-scale piano works of which his 5 Spanish Dances Opus 12 set are probably the best known existing in several formats. After moving to Paris in 1897 his health deteriorated from 1908 and his career quickly went into decline. From being rich and famous he soon lost all his money as a result of exchanging the copyrights on his music for government bonds which became worthless at the outbreak of the war in 1914.

Added: 2020-08-17 10:41:56

First Movement: Andante spiccato (organ version) from Concerto in D minor BWV 794 (after Marcello) Organ

This is J.S. Bach’s transcription of the first movement from A. Marcello’s oboe concerto. Bach was a great copier of music making it suitable for performance on the organ. Bach’s version dates from 1715. The score is marked Andante spiccato. Spiccato is a reference to a type of staccato and bowing technique on a string instrument. There is much to be learnt about the baroque concerto playing this movement and the terms frequently associated with the music all have a context. Tutti (all) ritornello (a recurring passage / theme / refrain) ripieno (whole group) concertino (solo group) episode (a musical section or passage that is not the theme). A competent performance of this movement should demonstrate that the player has a clear understanding of both the structure and texture. Remember that Bach’s keyboard transcription was originally an orchestral work. Ornaments featured in the movement are presented simply and consistently. Keyboard players will find many variants in terms of their frequency and their interpretation. Listen to recordings and copy the best of modern practice is the best advice. When learning the piece the music editor suggests omitting the ornaments. The ornaments have been written out in the piano video score available to view on our YouTube channel (the same ornaments feature in both the piano and organ sheet music scores). The organ sheet music score available from the PlentyMusic website has the symbols for the ornaments in place which understandably gives the score visual clarity. The organ realisation plays back at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Clarity in the articulation of every note is the challenge in playing the music of J. S. Bach. As is the custom with the notation of baroque music there is very little score detail but understandably as the piano invites dynamic shading there is scope for interpretation and nuance in a performance. The movement ends with a Tierce de Picardy aka a Picardy third. This is essentially refers to the use of a major chord at the end of a piece in the minor key.

Added: 2020-08-07 11:45:45

First Movement: Andante spiccato (piano version) from Concerto in D minor BWV 794 Piano

This is J.S. Bach’s transcription of the first movement from A. Marcello’s oboe concerto. Bach was a great copier of music making it suitable for performance on the organ. Bach’s version dates from 1715. The score is marked Andante spiccato. Spiccato is a reference to a type of staccato and bowing technique on a string instrument. There is much to be learnt about the baroque concerto playing this movement and the terms frequently associated with the music all have a context. Tutti (all) ritornello (a recurring passage / theme / refrain) ripieno (whole group) concertino (solo group) episode (a musical section or passage that is not the theme). A competent performance of this movement should demonstrate that the player has a clear understanding of both the structure and texture. Remember that Bach’s keyboard transcription was originally an orchestral work. Ornaments featured in the movement are presented simply and consistently. Keyboard players will find many variants in terms of their frequency and their interpretation. Listen to recordings and copy the best of modern practice is the best advice. When learning the piece the music editor suggests omitting the ornaments. The piano sheet music score available from the PlentyMusic website has the symbols for the ornaments in place which understandably gives the score more visual clarity. Players may wish to review the use of ornaments in the light of their own listening and study. Ornaments always need to played rhythmically with clarity and consistency. The piano realisation plays back at 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The ornaments have been written out in the piano video score available to view on our YouTube channel. Pianists need to approach a lightness in the hands and the music editor suggests a dry acoustic with minimal use of the sustaining pedal. Clarity in the articulation of every note is the challenge in playing the music of J. S. Bach. As is the custom with the notation of baroque music there is very little score detail but understandably as the piano invites dynamic shading there is scope for interpretation and nuance in a performance. The movement ends with a Tierce de Picardy aka a Picardy third. This is essentially refers to the use of a major chord at the end of a piece in the minor key.

Added: 2020-08-07 10:43:47

Second Movement: Adagio from Concerto in D minor BWV 794 Piano

This is J.S. Bach’s transcription of the second movement from A. Marcello’s oboe concerto. Bach was a great copier of music often making it suitable for performance on the organ. This is a keyboard arrangement of an oboe concerto attributed to the Venetian composer A. Marcello although Bach understood it to be a work by Vivaldi. J.S.Bach’s arrangement dates from 1715. It is work that is can be performed on the piano, organ and harpsichord. Careful reading of the score is required because of the numerous accidentals and the rhythmic accuracy that is required to play this movement as notated. The eighth note chordal accompaniment is very helpful in assisting accurate positioning of the notes. Playing a slow movement in a sustained and controlled way is a challenge and requires a different intensity than playing a movement in a moderate tempo. The realisation or video plays back at a tempo of 63 eighth note (quaver) beats to the minute although a tempo range from 60 to 66 eighth (quaver) notes to the minute is appropriate for the movement. and the ornaments are written out in full so what you see in the score is exactly what you hear. The sheet music music available from the PlentyMusic website has the symbols for the ornaments in place which understandably gives the score more visual clarity. The ornament markings in the sheet music score can be cross referenced with the video score and obviously with other recordings of the work. Players may wish to review the use of ornaments in the light of their own listening and study. Ornaments need to played rhythmically with clarity and consistency. There are a number of different ornaments that feature in the score. The music editor suggests omitting the ornaments win the early stages of learning the movement. The ornamentation in the realisation reflects current performance practice. The movement ends with a Tierce de Picardy aka a Picardy third. This is essentially refers to the use of a major chord at the end of a piece in the minor key.

Added: 2020-07-30 07:53:51

Third Movement: Presto from Concerto in D minor BWV 794 Organ

This is a keyboard arrangement of an oboe concerto attributed to the Venetian composer A. Marcello although Bach understood it to be a work by Vivaldi. J.S.Bach’s arrangement dates from 1715.It is work that is performed on the piano, organ and harpsichord. The organ realisation of this the Third Movement: Presto plays back at 56 dotted quarter note beats to the minute and the repeat is not played. In the video score the ornaments are written out in full. Additional ornaments can be added at the performer’s discretion. The music editor suggests listening to available recordings of this work before making a judgement about possible additions that could be made.Bach’s arrangement is mostly written in two parts is an excellent piece for a pianist to consider playing on the organ.The realisation utilises an 8’ Principal from a sample set. In a performance the organist could explore an alternative registration on the repeats.

Added: 2020-07-24 09:08:24

Bagatelle No. 7 in A Flat Opus 33

This is a concise and dramatic movement and representative of the compositional style of Beethoven around 1800 whilst the movement itself dates from 1803. The score is marked Presto and the realisation plays back at 108 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute. The music needs to be played with a sense of one in a bar. The repeats are also played in the realisation and the music editor suggests that they should be played as the piece is being studied. Much can be learnt about Beethoven’s craft as a composer from this relatively short movement. Slow very accurate playing is needed in the first instance before building up to performance tempo. It is an excellent piece to evaluate and improve piano technique. It is a type of piece that a pianist needs to return to every once and a while both to refresh and improve. Much of the movement needs to be played with a lightness in the hands. The edited sheet music score has suggested fingering in place. The sustaining pedal is used in some of the sections and the music editor suggests a change of pedal with each change of harmony.

Added: 2020-07-22 09:38:29

Pastorale arr. two manual organ with pedals

A beautiful movement in 12/8 time from the baroque Italian composer who studied with A. Scarlatti and B. Pasquini before working as a priest in South America. A pastorale is an instrumental composition usually in moderate tempo which suggests and evokes the life of a shepherd. Usually in 6/8 9/8 or 12/8 time they often feature a drone accompaniment reminiscent of the bagpipes, an instrument very much associated with shepherds. The use of thirds is another common feature and they are often played at Christmas. There are many examples from the repertoire including those by Corelli, Vivaldi, Handel and more recently Pietro Yon. The movement is in three sections. The first and last sections are in 12/8 and are played at 63 dotted quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. These two sections are 21 bar and 25 bars in length and are in similar character although the closing section is chromatic. The second section is 11 bars long and in common time and is played at 100 quarter note beats to the minute. Ornamentation is in place for the 11 bar middle section. For pianists playing the organ there is only one pedal note to play. The arrangement is for a two manual instrument and there is clear indication in the sheet music score as to which music is played on which manual. The movement can however be played quite satisfactorily on a one manual instrument. On the sheet music score Manual 1 refers to the swell and Manual 2 refers to the great. Players may prefer to substitute these terms on their music scores. In the instruments of Zipoli’s time changing the registration or choice of stops was effectively the only technique available to the organist to change the sound and volume. Modern instruments with swell pedals enabling the swell box to be opened and closed and change the volume were a much later invention. Three different registrations are suggested for playing the movement although only two are used in the realisation. Domenico Ziploi (1688-1726) was an Italian Baroque composer who lived and worked as a Jesuit priest in South America. Born in Prato, near Florence he studied with Alessandro Scarlatti and Bernardo Pasquini and in Rome produced in 1716 a collection of keyboard pieces titled Sonate d’intavolatura per organo e cimbalo. This music is still highly regarded and playable by intermediate level.

Added: 2020-07-14 11:09:49

Country Gardens arr. improver level piano solo (Melody in played by Left Hand)

This is another improver level arrangement for piano or keyboard with the melody being played by the left hand whilst the right plays an accompaniment. The intention of the arrangement is to encourage balanced in the hands with the right hand playing quietly and the left hand playing out the melody so that it is clearly heard. It is an ideal piece of music for the improver level keyboards player as the melody is both familiar and quickly internalised. Do pay attention to the rhythmic detail and particularly the dotted notes. The realisation plays back at 66 half note or minim beats to the minute. There is suggested fingering in place on the sheet music score and keyboard players should be aiming for rhythmic playing with a legato touch. The time signature is 2/2 often referred to as “cut time” meaning that there are two half note or minim beats to the bar. Country Gardens is a traditional English folk tune that was collected (notated) by Cecil Sharp in 1899 from the concertina playing of William Kimber who was the musician for Headington Quarry Morris Men. The chords are also notated above the treble clef stave using letter symbols simply to get players used to understanding how these these symbols are used particularly in the playing of folk and popular music.

Added: 2020-07-09 12:36:43

Second Movement: Andante from Sonatina in C Opus 20 No.1

The second movement Andante from Kuhlau’s Sonatina in C is an intermediate level piano solo and an excellent piece to play for those seeking to develop their legato playing in the context of a slow movement. Playing a slow movement does require emotional range and they are often more difficult to play than musicians imagine when compared to say a minuet and trio and a moderate tempo. This slow movement needs to be played with a clear awareness of the 6/8 timing which needs to be communicated in the playing. The rhythmic detail requires particular attention whilst the melody clearly needs to sing out over the accompaniment. The repeats are played in the realisation. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended and has been notated in just the first line of the sheet music score although its use is required for the whole movement. The convention when playing a repeated note in classical music is often to change the finger used and keyboard players may wish to develop this technique in this movement. A plain score is appended to the edited sheet music score enabling players to edit in their own choice of fingering and pedal markings.

Added: 2020-07-08 11:44:19

Country Gardens arranged for improver level piano

Country Gardens is a traditional English folk tune that was collected (notated) by Cecil Sharp in 1899 from the concertina playing of William Kimber who was the musician for Headington Quarry Morris Men. There are many variants of the tune and this is an improver level two part arrangement for piano or keyboard. It is an ideal piece of music for the improver level keyboards player as the melody is both familiar and quickly internalised. Do pay attention to the rhythmic detail and particularly the dotted notes. The realisation plays back at 72 half note or minim beats to the minute. There is suggested fingering in place on the sheet music score and keyboard players should be aiming for rhythmic playing with a legato touch. The time signature is 2/2 often referred to as “cut time” meaning that there are two half note or minim beats to the bar.

Added: 2020-07-08 10:20:17

Après un rêve arr. organ

The piece has its origins as a song composed in the key of the key of C minor published in 1878 and is one of the composers most beautiful and popular melodies. In this arrangement a tempo of 58 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute has been used in the realisation. Two registrations are suggested for the playing of the melody which is best played on a swell or choir manual. Fauré as a pianist and accompanist was very much regarded as something of a metronome and not considered to be very sympathetic to singers of his songs particularly when they added subtlety and nuance at the end of phrases. It would be beneficial to spend time reading through the text for the song in translation to have an understanding of the music’s original context. As an organ piece this music is suited to being played on different occasions.

Added: 2020-07-08 10:12:02

Frankie and Johnnie arr. improver level piano

Frankie and Johnnie is an improver level piano solo exploring the 12 bar blues in a swing style requiring it to be played with a triplet feel. The convention as far as notating swing rhythm can vary and be confusing. Listen to the realisation score and understand the conventions involved in the notation of the rhythmic shapes. The original text of the song is about jealousy and murder and likely to be in part true. There are hundreds of recordings of the song representing a great range of musical styles. The realisation plays back at 120 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute although the closing section is played at a slightly slower tempo. The music needs to be played in a relaxed manner and there is opportunity to explore the articulation of the melody notes. The best advice when playing this type of music is to essentially make a performance your own.

Added: 2020-06-30 13:50:50

Arrival of the Queen of Sheba arr. piano and organ

The “Arrival of the Queen of Sheba” is a very popular piece and is often used as a wedding processional. This shortened version has just 36 bars and lasts for just over a minute which is often long enough for the purposes of most weddings. The sounding key of the organ arrangement is G major whilst the realisation plays back at a tempo of 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Three registrations are suggested and used in the realisation and are suggested for a performance. There is also a piano score attached to the organ score as the music can be quite satisfactorily played on the manuals. Playing the full version is quite a challenge because of the key changes which make closing off the music in the context of a wedding rather unpredictable and often not easy. The sinfonia was originally scored for two oboes and strings and comes from Act III of Handel’s oratorio “Solomon.” The title the was given to the Sinfonia by Sir Thomas Beecham possibly in the 1930’s.

Added: 2020-06-30 10:11:12

II. Largo from Organ Sonata in D minor

The Largo from the Organ Sonata in D minor is a binary form movement in 12/8. The realisation plays back at 42 dotted quarter note beats to the minute whilst the trills sound on the playing of the repeats. The sheet music comes with both a piano and organ score. This is a very good movement to transition piano players into playing the organ with two manuals and pedals. The music editor suggests playing through the music without ornamentation in the first instance then adding the trills on the repeat. The advice on the use or ornaments is that appropriateness and consistency should be the abiding criteria in a performance. Ornamentation is a complex issue particularly at this time in music history. Apart from the consideration of Italian style there is also the fact that Galuppi is one of those composers who links one musical age and with another in what was a time of much change in performance practice. He composed a great number of works for keyboard instruments and was highly regarded as a performer. He also composed operas and sacred music. Galuppi’s music is not particularly well represented by publishers and one of the reasons for this is because of Napoleon’s invasion of Venice in 1797. As a consequence of this many of the composer’s manuscripts were lost. Baldassare Galuppi (1706 – 1785) was born on the Venetian island of Burano and whilst he worked in Vienna, London and St. Petersburg he was mostly based in Venice where he held a number of important musical positions. He is one of an important group of composers that link the baroque with the classical age and is identified particularly with the style galant movement.

Added: 2020-06-25 09:16:44

I. Allegro from Organ Sonata in D minor

The First Movement from Baldassare Galuppi’s Organ Sonata in D minor is in AB binary form. For those who wish to have more information on how the ornaments are played then the music editor suggests referring to the video sheet music score on YouTube where the ornaments are written out in full. As an organ piece the movement can be effectively played on a one manual instrument with possibly a choice of 8’ stops. This is music composed in the transition period between the baroque and classical periods. The A section is just 10 bars long and essentially comprises has two contrasting musical ideas or strains a and b with each strain being 5 bars long. The section closes in the dominant key of A minor. The B section is 20 bars long and opens with the same shape and strain as the first section but in A minor. Some new material is introduced at bar 16 and then after a few passing modulations the movement returns to the home key and opening strain of Section A at bar 23. Baldassare Galuppi (1706 – 1785) was born on the Venetian island of Burano and whilst he worked in Vienna, London and St. Petersburg he was mostly based in Venice where he held a number of important musical positions. He is one of an important group of composers that link the baroque with the classical age and is identified particularly with the style galant movement.

Added: 2020-06-25 08:58:48

III. Allegro e spiritoso from Organ Sonata in D minor

The uplifting third movement from Baldassare Galuppi's Organ Sonata in D minor has strong rhythmic shapes and harmonic sequences. The video score plays back at 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. A lightness in the registration is appropriate whilst the movement can be played the without repeats. There is a lovely exploration of space in this music with the rhythmic shapes being a strong feature of the musical content. Galuppi is one of an important group of composers that link the baroque with the classical age and is identified particularly with the “galant style” movement. Galuppi’s music is not particularly well represented by publishers and one of the reasons for this is because of Napoleon’s invasion of Venice in 1797. As a consequence of this many of the composers’ manuscripts misplaced and lost.

Added: 2020-06-25 08:30:11

Adagio from Sonata in A minor Wq 70/4, H 85

Carl Philip Emanuel Bach 1714 - 1788 is an important figure in music history and a composer that links the baroque with the classical era. He was an important influence on F.J.Haydn and L. van Beethoven who both held J. S. Bach’s composing son in high regard. This particular period in music history is a fascinating one and C.P.E Bach’s music is deserving of more attention both from the performance point of view and the need for well researched modern editions of his most popular music. This particular movement is in the “empfindsamer Stil” or sensitive style that is a feature in much of C.P.E.Bach’s music and other north German composers of the mid 18th century. It is approach that focuses on the expression of emotion in an intimate musical style that could be described as being declamatory or one that utilises both drama and dialogue. Whilst a movement with appeal there will be quite a challenge getting the piece to a performance standard. A realisation score with the ornaments all written out is appended to the sheet music score so that keyboard players can make a thorough study of the ornamentation of this work. This is an often complex and contradictory area but understandable because this composition comes from a time of great change in music. Keyboard players should have a sense of an eighth note quaver beat whilst the video score plays back at a tempo of 58 quaver beats to the minute. C.P.E. Bach’s favourite keyboard instrument was the in fact the clavichord and he was not really known to be an organ virtuoso like his father. He composed relatively little for the organ but did write some sonatas music for the sister of Frederick II, the Great, Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia. This movement which is part of a three movement sonata was composed sometime around 1755. C.P.E. Bach was known as the “Berlin Bach” whilst he worked in Berlin and then the “Hamburg Bach” when he moved there to replace his godfather Telemann as Kapellmeister. This distinguished him from his brother J.C. Bach who was known as the “London Bach”.

Added: 2020-06-24 20:57:13

Lascia chio pianga

The aria or song is taken from the opera Rinaldo which first appeared in 1711 and was revised in 1733. It is in ABA form and based on the sarabande rhythm which has the stress on the second beat of the three beats in the bar. When sung the Da Capo section would be an opportunity for the soloist to improvise and ornament the melody and this is option available to the organists although it is important to keep to the style and mood of the piece. This is very appropriate music for a solemn processional in an organ playing context. The use of three registrations is suggested and are indicated in the score. Rests have been indicated in all parts so that players have a clear understanding of the voicing. It is also a movement that invites interpretation and playing in different contexts. The arrangement is in the original key of F major although the tempo for the organ solo is more Larghetto than Largo which was the tempo indication in the opera. The video score plays back at a tempo of 66 half note or minim beats to the minute. Rests are indicated in the score enabling players to have a clear understanding of the voicing of the musical lines. Moskowski has also arranged the aria for piano.

Added: 2020-06-24 17:20:30

It Was A Lovely Holiday Improver Piano

It is intended to introduce keyboard players to “swing” playing. This slow blues has a simple two part texture. Whilst swing music has a triplet feel to it players need to appreciate that the conventions involved in the notation of the rhythm of swing style can vary and be confusing. Listen to the playback score and understand the conventions involved in the writing of swing music by studying the score notated in common time and the appended score in 12/8. Appreciate that swing music can be notated in more than one way. The notation convention in the edited music score with suggested fingering is how this music would normally be presented to the music reading musician. The form of the 32 piece can be represented by the letters A A B A with each section being 8 bars long. Keyboard players should be aiming for fluidity in their playing. The realisation plays back at 110 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. As a warm up to playing the piece the music editor suggests playing through through the following blues upwards and downwards slowly simply to become familiar with the sound of each scale. Eb major Eb F G Ab Bb C D Eb Eb blues Eb Gb Ab Bbb Bb Db Eb Eb minor Eb F Gb Ab Bb Cb D natural Eb Instrument players interested in this style of music will need to become familiar with terms like blue note and blues turnaround and spend time listening to blues style piano players particular from the New Orleans area.

Added: 2020-06-24 13:08:32

Für Elise for solo piano

A very familiar piano piece known as “Für Elise” and sometimes described as Bagatelle in A minor WoO 59 although it is actually in rondo form. Interestingly it is a piece that was not published until 40 years after the composer’s death. As a popular piece with some sections invitingly straightforward and others more challenging to play it is a movement that is frequently played badly. Counting and communicating the beats to the bar particularly in the tricky octave sections is essential if the timing is to be accurate. The realisation is lacking in tonal contrast. The movement needs to be played with a lightness in the hands which means that it shouldn’t be played too loudly. The performer needs to aim to communicate the simplicity of the music which actually is quite a rare quality in Beethoven’s music. The realisation is a little bit stiff and lacks fluidity especially in the statement and of the opening motif/shape and its many repetitions. The player has the opportunity to linger a little more than is demonstrated in the playback whilst always suggesting a one beat to the bar feel in the music. The music editor suggests the use the sustaining pedal and its use is indicated in the first section of the sheet music score. The bass line from bar 81 is an opportunity for pianists to use different fingers on the repeating notes and the music editor suggests the players write in their own fingering choices. For those wanting clarity on how to play the turn in bar 51 the music editor suggests looking at the video score on our YouTube channel. Click the link on the home page of the website. The music editor has not made use of repeat signs which is an option that could have been used in the first part of the movement Beethoven expanded the musical forms of the classical period. He also is an important link between the classical and the subsequent romantic age. As a composer he was especially interested in process and the exploration of musical ideas. Für Elise is also a romantic work in the sense that it invites a strong emotional response from both players and listeners.

Added: 2020-06-18 12:10:37

Rondo from Sonatina in C Opus 20 No. 1

The third movement from Kuhlau’s Sonatina in C is an intermediate level piano solo and an excellent piece to play for those seeking to acquire the piano technique needed to play classical music competently. This is a typical last movement of a sonatina or sonata in that it is light in mood and in rondo form. A rondo is a movement with a recurring theme and the structure can be represented by the letters ABACAB + a closing section or coda. For those who persevere in managing to play the movement competently there are many pieces waiting to be played from the classical repertoire. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Playing at this tempo does require lightness in the hands. This is perfect music for the piano with both themes and accompaniment perfectly suited to being articulated on the piano. The sustain pedal is may be used but its use is not indicated in the sheet music score. Friedrich Kuhlau (1786 – 1832) was a Danish composer and pianist of the late Classical and early Romantic time who along with a group of composers that includes Muzio Clementi (1752 -1832), Jan L. Dussek (1760 – 1812) and others composed piano music that is has become essential repertoire for the growing pianist.

Added: 2020-06-13 12:20:46

Duet No.3 BWV 804 (organ)

Duet No.3 BWV 804 in G major is an appealing work with a light, dance like character. It is an intermediate level performance piece reminiscent of the composers Two Part Inventions. The Duet does present a number of score reading challenges for the player even though the music is conceived in two parts. The 4 Duets are part of Clavier-Übung III or the German Organ Mass and composed really at the zenith of the composer’s contrapuntal writing. The edited music score has suggested fingering which may serve as a useful guide to how the movement is studied in the first instance. The music editors concept is that once familiarised with the movement that players will make use of the plain score perhaps substituting their own choice of fingering where they feel it is appropriate. The time signature is in 12/8 and the piano realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many fine performances of this movement on several different types of keyboard instrument that are worth exploring.

Added: 2020-06-13 12:10:53

Duet No.3 BWV 804 (piano)

Duet No.3 BWV 804 in G major is an appealing work with a light, dance like character. It is an intermediate level performance piece reminiscent of the composers Two Part Inventions. The Duet does present a number of score reading challenges for the player even though the music is conceived in two parts. The 4 Duets are part of Clavier-Übung III or the German Organ Mass and composed really at the zenith of the composer’s contrapuntal writing. The edited music score has suggested fingering which may serve as a useful guide to how the movement is studied in the first instance. The music editors concept is that once familiarised with the movement that players will make use of the plain score perhaps substituting their own choice of fingering where they feel it is appropriate. The time signature is in 12/8 and the piano realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. There are many fine performances of this movement on several different types of keyboard instrument that are worth exploring.

Added: 2020-06-13 11:59:40

It’s A Date

It's A Date is a beginner level piano/keyboard piece based on a 12 bar blues. As a beginner score the letter names of the notes appear in the note heads and suggested fingering is in place. The tempo of the playback on the video score is 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.Players need to take notice of the accent signs marked in the score and keep their hands as light as possible. Playing a blues structured piece of music does encourage fluent playing and the development of musical memory. The 12 bar blues forms the basis of much popular music of the 20th century.

Added: 2020-06-08 13:25:05

The One Ten Blues Piano Solo

The One Ten Blues is an improver level piano solo exploring the blues idiom at a medium tempo Formally it can be represented by the letters A B A with A having a standard 12 bar blues structure and B being a middle 8 bar section. A percussive approach to playing the keyboard is appropriate for this piece and the rhythm needs to be played in a straight manner. The realisation plays back at 110 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute. As a warm up to playing the piece the music editor suggests playing through through the following three blues scales upwards and downwards slowly simply to become familiar with the sound of the scale. C Eb F Gb G Bb C F Ab Bb B (natural) C Eb F G Bb C Db D F G For those wishing to connect blues music with rock and roll and rhythm and blues spend time listening to recordings by Louis Prima, Big Joe Turner, Louis Jordan, Fats Domino and others.

Added: 2020-06-08 11:03:46

The Wild Horseman from Album for the Young Opus 68

The Wild Horseman is an improver level piano solo and an ideal piece to encourage fast playing. In ternary form ABA the music comes from the collection that Schumann composed in 1848 for his three daughters. It is in A minor and is an excellent piece for developing arpeggio playing. It should be played at a fast tempo whilst the realization plays back at 110 dotted quarter note beats to the minute. The Album for the Young is one of the great collections of piano literature for the young player.

Added: 2020-06-01 10:28:12

Canzona No.5

Froberger’s Canzona No.5 is a work performed on both the organ and harpsichord. It is composed in three section ABC each being independent of the other. The music is conceived in 4 lines and imitation is a featured compositional process. The realization plays back at 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the A section, 76 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the B section and 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the final C section. When playing through the movement some thought does need to be given to the sharing of the lines between the two hands. There are moments in the score when there is tonal/modal ambiguity in the score. False relation is in evidence in the writing. This movement is evidence that the tonal system was not fully established and in place. The thematic ideas in all three sections are of a lively and uplifting character. The tempo is much slower at the cadence points at the end of the three section. Cadence points also offer an opportunity for ornamentation that needs to be appropriate style. The music is conceived in 4 parts and where a part is not being sounded rests also indicated in the score. When played on a two manual organ the A+C section can be played on one manual and the B section on another. 8 ft stops would be an appropriate choice for the registration. Johann Jacob Froberger (1616 – 1667) was a German baroque composer, harpsichordist and organist particularly remembered for creating and developing the keyboard suite. The composer generally would not allow his music to be published so only his patrons and friends were familiar with his music. As recently as 2006 an autographed manuscript of his music was discovered. He was a pupil of Frescobaldi and spent time living and working in Vienna.

Added: 2020-05-31 12:11:44

Second Movement Vivace from Piano Sonatina in C major Opus 55 No.1

This is a short concentrated movement having a lightness of mood often associated with final movements of musical works in the classical period. The melodic material is both appealing and chromatic scale passages can be described as transition preparing the way for a return to the opening theme. The final 12 bars can be described as a coda or closing section. The realization plays back at a tempo of 80 dotted quarter notes beats (dotted crotchet) to the minute. A lightness in the hands is essential to play this music at tempo. As an adult player revisiting a student piece it becomes much clearer what two techniques need to be practiced in order to become a competent keyboard player. Firstly, thumb under technique and fourth finger over technique (encouraged by practice of scales). Secondly, changing the finger on a repeating note encourages a lightness in the hands when playing music at this tempo. There is an edited sheet music score available which has suggested fingering available as a free score from the PlentyMusic website. A plain sheet music score is also appended. This particular movement is also excellent for exploring the full range of the piano. Friedrich Kuhlau (1786 – 1832) was a Danish composer and pianist of the late Classical and early Romantic time who along with a group of composers that includes Muzio Clementi (1752 -1832), Jan L. Dussek (1760 – 1812) and others produced piano music that is has become valued repertoire for the developing pianist and much of it has been used for teaching purposes.

Added: 2020-05-31 10:58:09

Piano Sonatina in C Opus 20 No.1 First Movement

A quite charming and beautiful movement perfect for developing and combining legato playing with a sound piano playing technique. The repeat is not played in the realization. The music editor has been quite minimalist as far as score detail is concerned simply because too many edited copies of this sonatina have score detail that is irrelevant when playing on a modern piano or keyboard. There is an edited sheet music score available which has suggested fingering on the website. This also has a plain sheet music score attached. The principle of contrast so essential to the classical composition is evident in this movement. Friedrich Kuhlau (1786 – 1832) was a Danish composer and pianist of the late Classical and early Romantic time who along with a group of composers that includes Muzio Clementi (1752 -1832), Jan L. Dussek (1760 – 1812) and others produced piano music that is has become essential repertoire for the developing pianist.

Added: 2020-05-21 16:03:42

Le jardin de Dolly (from the Dolly Suite Opus 56) arr. piano duet (piano 4 hands)

Le jardin de Dolly is the third movement of the Dolly Suite Opus 56 and was originally published as a piano duet. The realization score plays back at a tempo of 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. When performing the music there is an opportunity to slow down at the ends of phrases and then return to a tempo at the start of the next phrase and this approach is featured in both the realisation and the accompaniments. Gabriel Fauré’s Le jardin de Dolly is a lovely piano duet to play. Once you notice the detail of the scoring then you begin to appreciate the beauty of the writing and scoring. Use of the sustaining pedal to communicate the range of the harmonic colour is recommended and but not indicated in the sheet music score. The movement technically is not difficult to play but it does require careful reading and understanding of the contexts of the parts particularly when the melody moves to one of the inner parts. Too many duettists play this music too quickly which makes it rather abrupt as such and some of the reflective quality is lost. There are many recordings from both recent times and the recording archive which are worth exploring. The music editor was particularly impressed with the recording by Beatrice and Walter Klein who play the movement in an almost hushed secretive manner. The modal element that features in so much of Fauré’s music stems back to the fact that the composer like many French musicians was trained in the traditions of church music which referenced the old scales used particularly in the singing of plainchant. The two piano parts Primo and Secondo can be downloaded separately as “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo part The Primo part sounds on the right channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the left channel. Accompaniment 1 plays at 76 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 69 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a 4 bar click beat before the music starts playing to give a clear pulse to players. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players

Added: 2020-05-12 13:30:02

Minuet in G WoO 10 No.2 arr. clarinet in A & piano

A very appealing and familiar movement from the treasure trove of Beethoven’s works WoO (Without Opus number) Originally composed for orchestra, the manuscript was lost and the music has essentially been reconstructed from a piano arrangement. It is a melodic piece full of character and humour and this arrangement is for clarinet in A with piano accompaniment. In performance the Minuet is played with repeats followed by the Trio section marked Più mosso again with repeats. Finally, the first Minuet is repeated but this time without repeats. A rit. (slowing down) at the end of the two main sections (minuet and trio) is appropriate. The music editor urges those auditioning this piece to listen to many performances featuring different soloists get a clear vision of how the movement can and should be played. It is a Beethoven piece that frequently is played badly. A tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the first Minuet section and a tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the Trio section marked Più mosso. Accompaniments are available for this score with a four bar count in played on a two sounds of the wood block. Because of the tempo changes and the upbeat in the solo part there is a two beat click between the sections. Wood block sounds are recorded on one side of the stereo channel so that the sound can be silenced. Accompaniment 1 has a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 110 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 2 has a tempo of 108 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 116 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 3 has a tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 120 for the Trio section. This score was reviewed, revised with accompaniments added in 2020. A clarinet in A part appropriately transposed is appended to the music score. Although not quite correct the title Minuet in G has been retained for this movement.

Added: 2020-05-06 09:59:44

Minuet in G WoO 10 No.2 arr. bassoon & piano

A very appealing and familiar movement from the treasure trove of Beethoven’s works WoO (Without Opus number) Originally composed for orchestra, the manuscript was lost and the music has essentially been reconstructed from a piano arrangement. It is a melodic piece full of character and humour and this arrangement is for bassoon with piano accompaniment. In performance the Minuet is played with repeats followed by the Trio section marked Più mosso again with repeats. Finally, the first Minuet is repeated but this time without repeats. A rit. (slowing down) at the end of the two main sections (minuet and trio) is appropriate. The music editor urges those auditioning this piece to listen to many performances featuring different soloists get a clear vision of how the movement can and should be played. It is a Beethoven piece that frequently is played badly. A tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the first Minuet section and a tempo of 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is suggested for the Trio section marked Più mosso. Accompaniments are available for this score with a four bar count in played on a two sounds of the wood block. Because of the tempo changes and the upbeat in the solo part there is a two beat click between the sections. Wood block sounds are recorded on one side of the stereo channel so that the sound can be silenced. Accompaniment 1 has a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 110 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 2 has a tempo of 108 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 116 for the Trio section, Accompaniment 3 has a tempo of 110 quarter note (crotchet) beats for the Minuet and 120 for the Trio section. This score was reviewed, revised with accompaniments added in 2020. A bassoon part is appended to the music score.

Added: 2020-05-06 09:48:00

Fugue in E (originally in G) BuxWV 175 arranged for guitar trio

The three part Fugue in E BuxWV 175 originates as an organ work but readily transcribes as music that can be a guitar ensemble. It is a movement featuring much imitation in the three lines of music. It is also divided into three sections and is more canzona than fugue. The music needs to be played very evenly with a lightness of touch. Entries of the subject in the voices need to be stated clearly. The challenge in playing music in this style is creating space and communicating the intentions and formal shape of the music. The playback tempo in the realisation is 76 quarter note beats to the minute but the movement can be played at a quicker tempo if preferred. Individual guitar parts are appended to the full score. There is minimal score detail in the sheet music score as is the convention with music from this era. The music editor also suggests listening to some of the organ versions that exist readily accessible on streaming media. Buxtehude 1637 – 1707 was an important compose of the mid-baroque period and an important influence on J. S. Bach, G.F. Handel and G. P. Telemann. Whilst described as a German composer he considered to be Danish himself though the place he was born is now in Sweden! His place of work from 1668 was St. Mary’s Church, (Marienkirche) Lübeck and apart from his vocal music composed for church contexts there is a substantial amount of music for organ including preludes, toccatas and fugues, chorale settings and pieces based on repeating bass lines or ostinatos.

Added: 2020-04-28 06:28:51

Fugue in G BuxWV 175 piano/organ

The three part Fugue in G BuxWV 175 originates as an organ work but readily transcribes as music that can be played on the piano. It is a movement featuring much imitation in the three lines of music. It is also divided into three sections and is more canzona than fugue. The music needs to be played very evenly with a lightness of touch. Entries of the subject in the voices need to be stated clearly. The challenge in playing music in this style is creating space and communicating the intentions and formal shape of the music. The playback tempo in the realisation is 72 quarter note beats to the minute but the movement can be played at a quicker tempo if preferred. There is minimal score detail in the sheet music score as is the convention with music from this era. The music editor also suggests listening to some of the organ versions that exist readily accessible on streaming media. Buxtehude 1637 – 1707 was an important compose of the mid-baroque period and an important influence on J. S. Bach, G.F. Handel and G. P. Telemann. Whilst described as a German composer he considered to be Danish himself though the place he was born is now in Sweden! His place of work from 1668 was St. Mary’s Church, (Marienkirche) Lübeck and apart from his vocal music composed for church contexts there is a substantial amount of music for organ including preludes, toccatas and fugues, chorale settings and pieces based on repeating bass lines or ostinatos. It is worth exploring music originally intended for the organ and harpsichord performance on the piano. Alan Feinberg’s CD “Fugal State” and Francesco Tristano “Long Walk” are two contemporary collections that include the keyboard music of Buxtehude played on the piano.

Added: 2020-04-28 06:15:46

Variations on “Ich denke dein” WoO 74 for piano duet (piano 4 hands)

The 6 Variations with Coda “Ich denke dein” for piano duet (piano 4 hands) were composed in 1803 and published in 1805. A quite delightful set of variations based on a song melody with a text that roughly translates as “I think of you when the sun shimmers on the sea” which suggests that the composer belongs more to the romantic than the classical era. sf means suddenly loud and is one of Beethoven’s most used score markings as is not unsurprisingly fp meaning loud going to soft. In Beethoven’s music the surprise element is always strong particularly in respect to dynamics and rhythmic accents which are often placed on the weaker beats of the bar. Time signatures appear at the beginning of the theme and also the beginning of each variation. All movements apart from Variations 3 and 5 are in common time. Tempos in Variation 3 and 5 are more relaxed and slower with the music notated in 2/2 time. As his sketch books show, Beethoven was particular fond of re-working and revising his composition ideas but there is always purpose and a clear sense of direction in his music. Use of the sustaining pedal is recommended but has not been indicated in the score. The lines of music are rhythmically independent which makes playing the trills in Variation 4 challenging. Beethoven is always interested in developing piano technique and there is evidence of this particularly in Variation 4. This particular variation took the music editor as much time to prepare as the rest of the work put together! The music editor suggests omitting the ornaments particularly in this variation in the first instance. Any pianists/keyboard players not sure of how the ornaments should be played should refer to the video score on the YouTube channel to see a suggested solution. In the video score the ornaments written out in full and it sounds exactly as the realisation available as the mp3 from the website. The playing of ornaments is much more interesting and challenging in Beethoven’s time. The Primo and Secondo can be downloaded separately as “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. The tempos are as follows in quarter note beats to the bar with the second figure indicating the half note or minim beat tempos for variations 3 and 5. There are three accompaniments: Accompaniment 112/50 Accompaniment 2 108/48 Accompaniment 3 104/46. There is a four bar count in /click on the accompaniment mp3. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-04-18 12:14:31

Manchega arr. flute, acoustic guitar & violoncello

This music was published in 1860. This arrangement for flute, acoustic guitar and violoncello playing pizzicato has a playback tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. Gottschalk’s music is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal quality and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score The small ornamental notes in the flute part (acciaccaturas or crushed notes) should be omitted whilst the movement is being learnt. It is then up to the player’s own discretion as whether to play them or not. Accompaniments have not been prepared for this arrangement. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-08 11:01:35

Manchega arr. mandolin & two acoustic guitars

This music was published in 1860. This arrangement for mandolin and two acoustic guitars has a playback tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. Gottschalk’s music is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal quality and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score The small ornamental notes in the mandolin part (acciaccaturas or crushed notes) do not sound in the realization. The music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion as whether to play them or not. The two acoustic guitar parts are available as accompaniments and can be downloaded as mp3 files at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. The mandolin may want to explore playing some of the sections at a different octave and in respect to this the PlentyMusic team would appreciate feedback.

Added: 2020-04-08 09:55:03

Manchega arr. three marimba players

This music was published in 1860! This pitched percussion arrangement is or 3 marimba players has a plays back tempo of 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the realization. The music editor has left the articulations markings from his masterscore simply because they help players understand the music even though many of the markings do not have a context in this particular arrangement. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the Gb section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced byChopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulations and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. Marimba parts 2 and 3 are available as an accompaniment and can be downloaded as mp3 files at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts in what must have been a very challenging working life. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-08 09:28:53

Manchega arr. trumpet in Bb & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in the key of Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. If you do spend time listening to the music of Gottschalk one senses the underlying influence of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The small ornamental notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play them or not. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. The music editor worked from an old print copy of the work and there were several ambiguities in the score so any feedback on detail would be much appreciated.

Added: 2020-04-08 08:09:19

Manchega arr. trombone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in F and the B section in Ab. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. A trombone part is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion as whether to play them or not. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There is the influence of Chopin in the compositional style of Gottschalk. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the articulation of the notes and both tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 21:50:01

Manchega arr. tenor horn & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not play in the playback, They are in the score but are an optional addition. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. If you do spend time listening to the music of Gottschalk one senses the underlying influence of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play them or not. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 18:47:35

Manchega arr. euphonium & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in F and the B section in Ab. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure A euphonium part in the treble clef appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play them or not in a performance. There is a strong influence of Chopin in the music of Gottschalk particularly in the harmonic writing and figuration. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulations, tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 17:40:02

Manchega arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate his virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk composition approach is influenced particularly by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the articulations, dynamics and tonal range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. The small ornamental notes sound in the realization although the music editor suggests leaving them out c during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether to play or them or not.A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. The music editor worked from an old print copy of the work and there were several ambiguities in the score so any feedback on detail would be much appreciated.

Added: 2020-04-07 17:15:06

Manchega arr. violoncello & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realisation and it is then up to the player’s own discretion either to play them or not. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended for the accompanist but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s music is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. The small ornamental notes excluding the appoggiaturas do not sound in the realization. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 14:20:16

Manchega arr. viola & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. A viola part is appended to the full score. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes are probably best left out during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion either playing or not playing them. There is a strong influence of Chopin in the music of Gottschalk. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. Three accompaniments are available playing at 63, 60 and 57 dotted quarter (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-04-07 11:39:37

Manchega arr. violin & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended for the accompanist but is not indicated in the score. The music of Gottschalk is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamics, tonal range and articulation in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. A violin part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 11:24:31

Manchega arr. oboe & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The small ornamental notes can be omitted particularly when learning the piece where rhythmic accuracy and precision is needed. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. An oboe part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 07:11:11

Manchega arr. English horn & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the realization is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The small ornamental notes can be omitted particularly when learning the piece where rhythmic accuracy and precision are needed. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A flute part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 06:59:14

Manchega arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is strongly influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the dynamic and tonal range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A clarinet in B appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-07 06:45:09

Manchega arr. bassoon & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an étude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended for the accompanist but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s composing approach was influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation as well as dynamic and tonal range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. A bassoon part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts aka working hard. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 17:27:00

Manchega arr. alto saxophone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate his virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore how notes are articulated and the tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 17:17:27

Manchega arr. intermediate level piano

Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World” whilst Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana . The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate piano technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate his virtuoso playing. This is an intermediate level arrangement with the playback tempo of the realisation being 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns in and shared between the hands are secure. The use of the sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. In bar 34 players are required to play both a Cb and a C natural. Gottschalk’s piano writing more than suggests the influence of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal range and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music.

Added: 2020-04-06 11:43:37

Manchega arr. flute & two acoustic guitars

The music arranger is amazed that this piece of music was published in 1860! This arrangement for flute and two acoustic guitars has a plays back tempo of 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute in the realisation. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The writing of Gottschalk is strongly influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the tonal range and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows ready access to the music. Individual parts for the three instruments are appended to the full score. The small ornamental notes – acciaccaturas or crushed notes in the flute part but not the appoggiatura do not sound in the realization. The two acoustic guitar parts are available as accompaniments and can be downloaded as mp3 files at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts in what was a very hard working life. Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 11:01:17

Manchega arr. baritone horn & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate Gottschalk’s virtuoso playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section sounds in F and the B section in Ab. The repeat does not play in the playback, There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. A baritone part in the treble appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Players who would like the music notated in the bass clef please advise the PlentyMusic Office. The small ornamental or acciaccaturas (crushed) notes do not sound in the realization and the music editor suggests leaving them out certainly during the learning of the piece. It is then up to the player’s own discretion whether or not to play them. There is a strong influence of Chopin in the music of Gottschalk. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore articulation, tonal and dynamic range in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American Creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 10:14:51

Manchega arr. flute & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the realization is 60 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in D and the B section in F. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The small ornamental notes can be omitted particularly when learning the piece where rhythmic accuracy and precision are needed. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. Gottschalk’s writing is influenced of Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A flute part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 10:01:04

Manchega arr. soprano saxophone & piano

Manchega originates as a concert étude for piano – an etude in music is a study. Such movements are intended to improve and demonstrate technique and in the context of the original arrangement was intended to demonstrate the composer’s virtuoso piano playing. The playback tempo in the playback score is 58 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The movement in ABA (Ternary form) which was very much the standard form during the romantic period. Composers needed to follow the conventions of their time to ensure the patterns of their music were readily recognized by audiences. The A section is in Eb and the B section in Gb. The repeat does not sound in the playback. There has been some re-scoring but not re-writing of the original material. This is an excellent piece for developing 3 v 2 playing which is such a characteristic element of Spanish and music based on Spanish models. The music editor suggests practicing the music slowly in the first instance so that all rhythmic shapes and patterns are secure. The use of the piano sustaining pedal is recommended but is not indicated in the score. The writing of Gottschalk is influenced by Chopin. As the repetitive element in the movement is strong there is an opportunity to explore the tonal range, articulation and dynamics in a performance. The music editor suggests that this movement along with much of Gottschalk’s music is worth discovering particularly in arrangements where the playing level allows access to the music. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 63 Accompaniment (2) 60 and Accompaniment (3) 57 dotted quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829 – 1869) was an American composer and pianist born in New Orleans who spent most of his performing career touring and giving concerts. He was often referred to as the greatest pianist from the “New World.” Chopin, Liszt and Alkan were great admirers of his talent. His compositions established him as one of the first identifiable American composers. In his music it is possible to hear a mix of American creole, African-American and European music traditions. His early works in particularly are imbued with the sounds that he heard in his youth in Louisiana. The syncopated nature of his music anticipates many of the characteristics of later American ragtime and jazz music.

Added: 2020-04-06 08:32:38

Bolero from 5 Spanish Dances for piano duet (piano 4 hands)

Moritz Moszkowski (1854 – 1925) was a German composer of Polish – Jewish descent who was an exceptional pianist and well known at the end of the 19th century as a concert pianist, conductor, composer and teacher. He was also a competent violinist. He composed many small-scale piano works of which his 5 Spanish Dances Opus 12 set are probably the best known existing in several formats. After moving to Paris in 1897 his health deteriorated from 1908 and his career quickly went into decline. From being rich and famous he soon lost all his money as a result of exchanging the copyrights on his music for government bonds which became worthless at the outbreak of the war in 1914. The Spanish sound is referenced by use of the phrygian mode which has the semi-tones between the first and second and the fifth and sixth degree of the scale - D Eb F G A Bb C D. The rhythmic shapes are from patterns associated with the Bolero which originated in Spain during the C18th as a form of ballroom dance and became a template and form used by many composers of art music. Music associated with particular countries and regions of Europe particular on its fringes became very popular towards the end of the 19th century in a movement that was known as nationalism. Moszkowski was a very well known composer artist in his own time but after his death like many composers his music disappeared from concert programmes. Score detail is in place for the whole movement simply for clarity. The suggested tempo to play this movement advised by the music editor is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute but a realistic and equally satisfactory tempo is 96 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. There are two options as to how to play the trills . Either as in the video score which can be viewed on our YouTube channel or by playing semi quavers. One of the characteristics of a Bolero is that it they speed up at the end and this feature has been retained in the realizations and accompaniments. This Bolero is a great ensemble piece offering plenty of contrast and pianistic in the sense that it quite playable. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 104 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 100 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 96 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a four bar count in that features the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players. One of the characteristics of a Bolero is that it they speed up at the end and this feature has been retained in the realizations and accompaniments. This Bolero is a great ensemble piece offering plenty of contrast and pianistic in the sense that it quite playable. For those who want to explore the music of Moszkowski Étincelles (Sparks) from the Opus 72 set of Études is quite a movement often played as an encore at the end of a concert.

Added: 2020-03-14 07:48:16

Study in Canon No.1 Opus 56 arr. piano duet (piano 4 hands)

A movement with beauty, shape and a sense of space. The imitation principle is understandably very strong in this work composed, the music editor understands, when Schumann was intent on restoring rigour and confidence to his own compositional process. For the players there is surprisingly intensity and discipline needed to play this relatively short movement. Whilst this music references the past there is a romantic twist or two in the harmonic language. A tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is used in the realisation. Trills begin on the note and have been written out in the first section of the score in the ossia staves. Understand that the melodic and rhythmic shapes of the ornaments are constant throughout the whole movement. The French word for study is Etude and those who develop or have developed a keen interest in music will be very aware of the many musical challenges associated with this word! Schumann’s Canonic Studies were composed in 1845 for pedal piano and subsequently arranged for piano duet / piano four hands by Georges Bizet. There are also other versions for organ, two pianos and string quartet. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 80 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 76 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 72 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 4 at 68 quarter note beats to the minute.. There is a two bar count in with the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-03-05 11:15:26

Berceuse (Dolly Suite) arr. piano duet (piano 4 hands)

A charming and quite beautiful piece which has been arranged for many different instrument combinations although its origins are as a piano duet. A berceuse is a lullaby or cradle song so a gentle lilting approach is a required with nothing happening abruptly. The realisation plays at 69 quarter note beats to the minute. When performing this music there is an opportunity to slow down at the ends of phrases and then return to tempo at the start of the next phrase. Markings to indicate this are not included in the score. Pedalling has been indicated in the score. The sustaining pedal is put down as the first sound at the beginning of the bar is being played and lifted on the second beat of the bar. Additional pedalling can be added even though it might not be indicated on the score but it should never muddy the texture and lines of the music. The modal element that features in much of Faure’s music is also evident. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 76 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 72 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 68 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. There is a four bar count in with the sound of a woodblock. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-03-04 15:07:39

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. euphonium & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for euphonium accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Euphonium players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A euphonium part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 09:41:19

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. baritone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for baritone accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Baritone players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A baritone horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 09:36:01

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. tenor horn & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for tenor horn accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Tenor horn players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A tenor horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 09:32:31

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for horn in F (French horn) accompanied by the piano the sounding key is F. Horn in F (French horn) players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A horn in F (French horn) part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:55:38

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. trombone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for trombone accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Trombone players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t as well represented in the realization as it might be. A trombone part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:51:47

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. tuba & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for tuba accompanied by the piano the sounding key is F. Tuba players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A tuba part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:45:31

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. trumpet in Bb & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for trumpet in Bb accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Trumpet players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a featured of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-04 08:35:33

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. violoncello & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for violoncello accompanied by the piano the sounding key is D. Violoncello players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 18:46:14

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. viola & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for viola accompanied by the piano the sounding key is F. Violists players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A viola part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 18:34:55

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. violin & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for violin accompanied by the piano the sounding key is D. Violin players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A violin part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 18:19:12

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for tenor saxophone accompanied by the piano the sounding key in Eb. Tenor saxophone players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not a feature of the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A tenor saxophone part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 17:21:53

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. alto saxophone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for alto saxophone accompanied by the piano the sounding key is Eb. Flute players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. An alto saxophone part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 17:11:04

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. soprano saxophone & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for soprano saxophone accompanied by the piano sounding in the key of Eb, the soloist should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 16:57:54

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. English horn & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for English horn accompanied by the piano sounding in the key of F, soloists should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 16:06:24

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. bassoon & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for bassoon accompanied by the piano the sounding key in D. Bassoon players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A bassoon is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 11:18:47

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for clarinet in Bb accompanied by the piano sounding in the key of Eb, soloists should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-03 10:39:36

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. oboe & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for oboe accompanied by the piano the sounding key in D. Oboe players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. An oboe part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-02 17:35:23

Mi Teresita (Little Waltz) arr. flute & piano

Teresa Carreño 1853 – 1917 was a Venezuelan concert pianist and composer whose career spanned a period of 54 years. Known for her powerful and spirited playing she earned the title from her Berlin years as the “Valkyrie of the piano.” She was closely associated with the music of Edward MacDowell, a pupil, premiering several of his works and also the music of Amy Beach. She lived in the USA and Berlin which became her base for her years in Europe. Her schedule of concerts and the longevity of her career suggests that she was very hard working. A superb player of octaves she possessed a powerful tone and great strength. She travelled widely performing in Europe including the Henry Wood Proms, USA and Australia. Henry Wood wrote that "It is difficult to express adequately what all musicians felt about this great woman who looked like a queen among pianists - and played like a goddess.” She must indeed have been a larger than life character because over 100 years after her death her legacy remains strong and there are player piano recordings of her work available. “Mi Teresita” (Little Waltz ) composed in 1885 for her daughter Teresita was one of her most popular pieces during her lifetime and often performed as an encore at her own concerts. In this arrangement for flute accompanied by the piano the sounding key in D. Flute players should be aiming for a beautiful legato and focusing on the tonal quality of their playing. The movement should not be played too quickly and there is a captivating closing section. The considerable range of dynamics also needs to be explored in a performance. Rubato is an aspect of the performance that players can consider although it is not featured in the realization. The melody is reminiscent of something that might feature in a music box and it is a pity that a lilting quality isn’t quite represented in the realization. A flute part is appended to the full score. Piano accompaniments are also available for download in mp3 format at tempi of Accompaniment (1) 128 Accompaniment (2) 124 and Accompaniment (3) 120 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-03-02 16:50:39

Children’s March in G for Piano Duet D.928 (Piano 4 Hands)

The Children’s March is an intermediate level piano duet. The repeats are played in the realization and the formal pattern can be summarized as follows. March: A A B B Trio: A A B B March Da Capo (No repeats) AB. This is a template that appears in much classical and romantic music. As is the convention the repeats are not played in the Da Capo repeat of the March. There is a great range of tempo explored in the many performances available of this march. The realization playback at 96 quarter (crotchet) note beats to the minute. This is a characterful and appealing piece with enough contrast and charm to make it an interesting performance piece for both performers and audiences. No sustaining pedal is indicated in the sheet music score although its (minimal) use is suggested. Musical ideas are shared between the parts and players need to be sensitive with regard to the dynamics that they use. Many of Schubert’s greatest works are composed for piano duet and he made a substantial contribution to the repertoire. The composing context often related to his circle of friends for whom he would often write music. Whilst the Children’s March is a short work there are some substantial and large scale works also waiting to be explored. In the Trio section the triplets require a lightness in of touch in the way they are played. It is also important to understand that the Primo and Secondo parts are rhythmically independent. The accompaniment downloads that are available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 96 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 90 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 84 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute. If players are using a metronome in their preparation then it might be sensible to play to a half note or minim beat. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-03-02 10:00:00

March No. 1 of Three Marches Opus 45 for piano duet (piano 4 hands)

The Three Marches Opus 45 for piano duet (piano 4 hands) were composed in 1803 and published in 1804. The march form features strongly in 19th century music. In March No.1 the composer does not quite follow convention in the formal arrangement and symmetry of the typical March and Trio. March No. 1 can be represented as follows - March A B B Trio A A B March Da Capo (no repeats) A B. The realisation and music scores are presented as the movement is performed so repeats where indicated are played. The score detail in Beethoven’s music is always interesting particularly regarding dynamics. Accents for example, are often placed on the weaker beats of the bar and the surprise element in a score is always strong. The playback score plays back at a standard march tempo of 60 half note beats to the minute. The Trio is played at the same tempo as the March. Beethoven is particularly fond of adding closing sections often referred to as codas and there is a lovely example from bars 36 to 40. This is an excellent movement for understanding Beethoven’s approach to composition in his so called “middle” period. While many of the musical elements are straightforward the composer’s desire to expand and develop form, harmony and process are constantly evident. In addition, Beethoven’s music always has a strong rhythmic focus. All the way through the movement musical ideas are shared and developed creating what is a great ensemble piece. The ornaments in the music of Beethoven and his contemporaries also offer more challenges than those of the classical era. There are considerations as far starting notes and the number of notes played in trills - trills at important cadences can add to the dynamic and intensity of a performance. You might notice that the video score has a 6 note trill played at the end of the March although in the realization it is played as a four note shape. The Primo and Secondo parts can be downloaded as “accompaniments” enabling players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the right channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the left channel. The tempos are as follows in quarter note beats to the minute. Accompaniment 1 126 Accompaniment 2 120 Accompaniment 3 112. There is a four bar count in /click on the accompaniment mp3. When performing printing two pages of music on to one side of A4 offers a practical solution for players. It is a good idea for players to use a metronome in their preparation.

Added: 2020-03-02 09:40:46

Third Movement Molto presto from Keyboard Sonata for piano duet in B Flat K.358

The Molto presto third movement of the Sonata for piano duet in B flat K.358 is a positive, joyous and like much of the composer’s music uplifting. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 108 half note (minim) beats to the minute. The first repeat is played in the realisation whilst the second repeat indicated in the sheet music score is not played. Multi-rests have not been used in the sheet music score but there are numbers in place indicating the empty bars in the sheet music score. This is a movement that does need to be played quickly and some of the tempi available on recordings are actually very challenging to play. The best advice is to start at a manageable tempo and then gradually increase it. The tempo of the movement as it is being played does however always need to be consistent. The music editor suggests setting a metronome to a half note (minim) beat minim beat in practice routines. There is opportunity for developing the “changing finger on a repeating note” technique and the playing of trills played by two hands requires careful practice. In the early stages of learning the movement the music editor suggests omitting the trills. For those wanting to see how the trills are played they can refer to the video score on our YouTube channel by clicking the appropriate link on the homepage of the website. The movement has many melodic shapes, textures and compositional processes characteristic of the composer and the music editor suggests that much can be learnt about the composer’s musical style by playing and listening to the piano duets. Mozart’s music always has a great sense of ensemble and his musical language is always consistent across the many musical forms that he embraced. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the primo or secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 108 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 104 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 104 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute There is a four bar count in featuring two different sounds of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-02-15 12:42:01

First Movement Allegro from Sonata for Piano Duet in B Flat K.358

The First Movement from the Sonata for Piano Duet in Bb K.358 for piano 4 hands is an intermediate level piano duet. The realization plays back at a tempo of 144 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Mozart composed many piano duets which he would often perform with his elder sister Nannerl. A lightness of touch is required in a performance and all notes need to be clearly articulated. There is some lovely sharing of the melodic ideas in the ensemble. Playing Mozart requires a consistent and even approach and the avoidance of exaggerated playing. As far as the ornaments are concerned players should be imitating each other in their delivery. Trills played by both hands together do require careful practice The music editors view on the playing of ornaments is that they should be played simply, rhythmically and consistently. This is music that is very much about melody and accompaniment and it is important for players to communicate its charm and beauty. The first repeat is played in the realization and the second repeat marked in the sheet music score is typically omitted in a performance. There are not many crescendo markings evident in many of the piano duet scores available simply because much of Mozart’s keyboard music was written with the harpsichord in mind. The harpsichord is able to offer a contrasting range of dynamics but not a gradual increase (crescendo) or decrease in sound (diminuendo).The piano or more accurately the fortepiano invented by Christofori was work in progress during Mozart’s lifetime but essentially early pianos were much thinner toned instruments compared to the iron framed pianos familiar to modern ears. The fp indication loud going to soft is one more typically associated with both the instruments and piano music of Beethoven. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the Primo or Secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the Secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 144 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 132 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 120 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute There is a four bar count in featuring two different sounds of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-02-15 09:49:53

Second Movement Adagio from the Sonata for Piano Duet in B Flat K.358

The Second Movement: Adagio from W.A. Mozart’s Sonata for Piano duet in Bb K.358 is an intermediate level piano duet. The Sonata, composed in the period 1773-74 in Salzburg was most probably intended to played by Mozart and his older sister, Nannerl. The realisation score plays back at a tempo of 58 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. The first repeat is usually played in a performance whilst the second indicated in the sheet music score is usually omitted. Pianists and keyboard players do need to approach the work with a lightness of touch in their hands. When playing the movement as part of an ensemble one of the performing challenges is to maintain clarity in the texture and to communicate the melodic ideas and how these are shared between the players. Whilst not indicated in the score minimal use of the sustaining pedal is suggested. The octave playing in the Secondo part needs careful practice and occasional use of the fourth finger is also suggested for this particular passage. The trills particularly in the Primo part when they are played by both hands also require attention. No repeats are played in the realisation. The challenge when playing Mozart is actually to make it sound like Mozart with a lightness of touch and beauty of sound. The accompaniment downloads available enable players to enjoy an ensemble music experience playing either the primo or secondo parts. The Primo part sounds on the one channel of the stereo signal and the secondo part sounds on the other. Accompaniment 1 plays at 58 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute, Accompaniment 2 at 56 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute and Accompaniment 3 at 54 quarter note beats (crotchet) to the minute There is a two bar count in featuring two different sounds of a wood block. When performing printing two pages of music onto one side of A4 offers a very practical solution for players.

Added: 2020-02-14 17:38:59

Tico-Tico arr. mandolin + TAB and acoustic guitar + TAB

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for mandolin and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. The appended parts for both mandolin and acoustic guitar have TAB charts to support the conventionally notated copy. This syncopated piece is structured into three sections and can be represented formally as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version it is a piece that has travelled widely in various different formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 88 (2) 84 (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 17:01:12

Tico-Tico arr. mandolin and acoustic guitar

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for mandolin and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. This syncopated piece is structured into three sections and can be represented formally as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version it is a piece that has travelled widely in various different formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. Both players are required to play from the full score. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 88 (2) 84 (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 15:55:12

Tico-Tico arr. marimba and acoustic guitar + TAB

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for marimba and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. The appended part for the acoustic guitar also has a TAB chart to support the conventionally notated copy. The piece is structured into three sections and formally can be represented as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version and is a piece that has travelled widely in various formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. There is understandably in this Brazilian piece a strong syncopated element. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 88 (2) 84 (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 15:46:12

Tico-Tico arr. marimba and acoustic guitar

In this arrangement of Tico-Tico for marimba and acoustic guitar the sounding key is A minor/major and the realization plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played. This syncopated piece is structured into three sections which can be represented formally as AABBAACCA. Dating from 1917 this Brazilian choro (lament) was composed by Abreu and whilst there is no definitive notated version it is a piece that has travelled widely in various different formats. It is an excellent ensemble piece and there are many arrangement possibilities suited to both formal or more informal music making activities. Both players are required to play from the full score. Accompaniments featuring the acoustic guitar can be downloaded as mp3 files playing at (1) 88 (2) 84 (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-15 15:02:23

Over the Waves arr. flute & piano

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most familiar of Latin American melodies. The waltz is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground. This improver level (second year players) movement in ternary ABA form is an ideal ensemble piece. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. A flute part is appended to the full score and the sounding key is Bb. Piano accompaniments are available as an mp3 download at tempi of (1) 60 (2) 58 and (3) 56 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-07 21:58:52

Over the Waves arr. pitched percussion (two marimbas)

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most well known Latin American pieces. The waltz melody is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground organs and was used for the song "The Loveliest Night of the Year" from the MGM film "The Great Caruso." This improver level (second year players) movement in ternary ABA form is an ideal ensemble piece. The realisation which features two marimbas playsback at 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and pitched percussion players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. Piano accompaniments are available as an mp3 download at tempi of (1) 60 (2) 58 and (3) 56 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute.

Added: 2020-01-07 19:55:21

Over the Waves arr. piano solo (Melody + Chords)

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most familiar of all Latin American pieces. The waltz melody is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground organs and was used for the song "The Loveliest Night of the Year" from the MGM film "The Great Caruso." This improver level (second year players) movement is a melody accompanied by vamped chords The realisation plays back at 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and keyboard players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. The movement is in ternary form

Added: 2020-01-07 19:45:44

Over the Waves arr. piano solo (Two Part)

Juventino Rosas was a Mexican composer and violinist who began his career as a street musician. After a visit to Cuba in 1894 he became very poorly and sadly died at the young age of 26. "Over the Waves" (Sobre las Olas) was published in Mexico in 1888 and is one of the most well known Latin American pieces. The waltz melody is nowadays played by many stylistically differing types of performing groups. The melody is very much associated with the music of funfairs, trapeze artists and fairground organs and was used for the song "The Loveliest Night of the Year" from the MGM film "The Great Caruso." This improver level (second year player) movement is a two part version. The realisation plays back at 60 dotted half note (minim) beats to the minute and players need to communicate a one to the bar feel in their playing. The movement is in ternary form.

Added: 2020-01-07 19:13:26

None but the Lonely Heart arr. solo piano

Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. For the pianist the challenge is to communicate the melody of the song with as much of the intended accompaniment as possible. In the transcription there has been some necessary editing of the chords and the technique of crossing hands will need to be explored by the keyboard player to ensure legato playing of the melody. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which the pianist will need to take into consideration during a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. Pianists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Songs are understandably often arranged in different keys and two versions are available in the pdf download the first in Eb and the second in D.

Added: 2020-01-03 14:29:46

None but the Lonely Heart arr. flute, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for flute accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the flute player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprising marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adds both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 09:31:41

None but the Lonely Heart arr. oboe, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for oboe accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the oboe player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprises marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adds both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 09:04:37

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violin, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for violin accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the violin player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprises marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 08:37:52

None but the Lonely Heart arr. viola, marimba & acoustic guitar

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for viola accompanied by marimba and acoustic guitar keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the viola player to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment comprises marimba and acoustic guitar with off-beat or syncopated chords adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute as an mp3 download. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the marimba and acoustic guitar accompaniment is available playing at (1) 88 (2) 90 (3) 92 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music with the music editor suggesting that this is both an excellent performance and assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-03 08:24:13

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violin & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for violin and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the soloist to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 92 (2) 90 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music and the music editor suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 21:17:29

None but the Lonely Heart arr. viola & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for viola and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the soloist to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 92 (2) 90 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music and the music editor suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 21:10:28

None but the Lonely Heart arr. oboe & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for oboe and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the soloist to develop both control and quality of tone in their playing. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 92 (2) 90 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a considerable musical and emotional range in the music and the music editor suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 20:57:39

None but the Lonely Heart arr. flute & two acoustic guitars

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 and comes from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. This arrangement for flute and two acoustic guitars keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song and is an excellent piece for the flute soloist to develop both control and quality of tone. The accompaniment is played by two acoustic guitars with the off-beat or syncopated chords in the acoustic guitar 2 accompaniment adding both intensity and urgency to the music. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 90 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. Individual parts are appended to the full sheet music score and the guitar duo accompaniment is available playing at (1) 92 (2) 90 (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute as an mp3 download. For a piece of just 54 bars in length there is a both considerable musical and emotional range which suggests that this is an excellent assessment piece.

Added: 2020-01-02 19:39:25

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violin & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Violin players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A violin part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 18:55:21

None but the Lonely Heart arr. violoncello & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Cellists should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1)92 (2)88 (3)84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A violoncello part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 17:00:59

None but the Lonely Heart arr. viola & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Viola players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A viola part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 13:35:09

None but the Lonely Heart arr. tuba & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Tuba players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A tuba part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 13:25:02

None But The Lonely Heart Heart arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Trumpet players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A trumpet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 13:19:45

None but the Lonely Heart arr. trombone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Trombone players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A trombone part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 12:50:35

None but the Lonely Heart arr. tenor horn & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Tenor horn players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A tenor horn part notated in the treble clef and appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 12:28:52

None but the Lonely Heart arr. euphonium & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Euphonium players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A euphonium part notated in the treble clef and appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 12:03:51

None but the Lonely Heart arr. baritone saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Baritone saxophone players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A baritone saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 11:40:19

None but the Lonely Heart arr. English horn & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Oboe players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. An English horn part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-02 11:19:35

None but the Lonely Heart arr. bassoon & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A bassoon part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 17:24:11

None but the Lonely Heart arr. soprano saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 17:12:46

None but the Lonely Heart arr. tenor saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 16:23:10

None but the Lonely Heart arr. alto saxophone & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song and dates from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment and audition piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Solo players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing control and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 15:55:32

None but the Lonely Heart arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Clarinet players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2020-01-01 15:34:40

None but the Lonely Heart arr. oboe & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Oboe players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. An oboe part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2019-12-31 16:13:49

None but the Lonely Heart arr. flute & piano

None but the Lonely Heart originates as a song dating from 1869 coming from the composer’s Opus 6 collection. The poetry was written by the German romantic poet Goethe and subsequently translated into Russian. The music editor recommends reading a translation of the text although the clear message in the poem is an expression of loneliness. Although only 54 bars long the piece has great emotional and musical range making it an ideal assessment piece. The repeating elements add unity to the song which has strong rhythmic and melodic shapes. Whilst there is a clearly evident phrase structure there are some overlapping phrases and the occasionally musical link which players need to take into consideration during a performance. Musically the falling minor 7th in the melody is characteristic as is the chromatic harmony which features a number of half-diminished 7th chords. Flute players should be aiming for a legato in their playing ensuring that they feature contrasting dynamics in a performance. This arrangement keeps close to the composer’s original version of the song. There is a considerable amount of score detail and it is an excellent piece for developing controlled and quality of tone in solo playing. The suggested phrasing is determined by the shape of the melody and the punctuation of the poetry. Accompanists will need to make use of the sustaining pedal whilst the off-beat or syncopated chords in the accompaniment add to the intensity of the music. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 92 quarter notes or crotchet beats to the minute. There are accompaniments available playing at (1) 92 (2) 88 (3) 84 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute from the PlentyMusic website. A flute part is appended to the sheet music score.

Added: 2019-12-31 16:07:12

Keyboard Sonata in D R.84

This is a stunning piece and often played as an encore. There are many fine performances of this work some of them taken at speeds that could be described as frightening. For the sake of clarity in communication the sheet music score is the same as the realisation or playback score. A plain score is also appended to the edited music score. This work needs to be played with the fingers close to the keys control and a light touch as many notes are played staccatissimo and the changing fingers on a note technique will need to be used. Where appropriate look for opportunities to use sequential fingering. The cadences can and should be played with more fluidity than is demonstrated in the realisation particularly if additional ornaments are added in the repeats. A tempo of 76 dotted quarter notes to the minute is used in the realisation and the work should be played with a one in the bar feel. If you can manage a tempo of 80 dotted quarter notes to the minute then music does really come alive The advice on playing the ornaments is to be consistent, maintain rhythmic symmetry and explore options in the repeat sections. The music editor has yet to find two performers who have the same or at least a similar approach to the playing of the ornaments and suggests that players should listen to various performances of the work. Padre Antonio Soler was a Spanish Catalan composer whose work belongs to the late Baroque and early Classical times. His best known works are his one movement sonatas which show the influenced by Domenico Scarlatti. Soler also took Holy Orders in his early 20’s and working at the monastery known as EL Escorial near to Madrid in Spain combining his duties as a monk with composition and teaching. His music was catalogued by Rubio early in the 20th century. This music is played on the harpsichord and piano whilst there are arrangements of this sonata for the harp and classical guitar.

Added: 2019-12-13 12:31:04

Prelude in G BWV 902

This prelude possibly dates from 1730 and is composed in four voices or lines of music with some sections having all voices sounding, whilst in others three and sometimes only two. It opens with a section that is almost vocal in character before it transforms into a keyboard piece. There are no ornaments indicated in the score although there is an extraordinary amount of detail in the rhythmic figuration. The B section which begins at Bar 29 has some almost toccata like shapes whilst a four octave range is explored in the keyboard writing. The tempo of the realisation and playback is 72 quarter note beats to the minute and the repeats are not played. The repeat bar is indicated by a double bar at the end of bar 28 and there is also one at the end of the final bar in the sheet music score. One challenge for the performer is communicating the layers and lines that exist in the music with an awareness of an eighth note or quaver pulse. Another is to play the movement at a tempo that is appropriate and which can be maintained for the whole movement. Some of the figuration in the score can be a challenge to play if the tempo is too fast. The piece can be performed AB, AAB and even AABB the latter making it quite a long piece. The music editor when learning the movement started with the final section bars 41-56, before playing bars 29-56 and then the piece as a whole. The specified fingering is appropriate for someone who can manage a reach of a 9th with both hands. A plain score is also appended to the edited music score.

Added: 2019-12-13 10:48:27

Piccolo Valzer

Puccini’s Piccolo Valzer dates from 1894 and but was revisited by the composer becoming Musetta’s Waltz “Quando me n’vo” in Act II of the opera “La Boheme.” It is interesting to play this waltz melody as a piano piece and the music editor suggests a Moderato tempo rather than Lento. The composer was inspired to write the work after a boat trip fishing on the lake close to his home. The playing instruction con ondulazione is a reference to ripples on the water. Pianists need to avoid playing with too heavy a touch and the sustaining pedal needs to be used or else the playing may sound on the lumpy side. This is marked in the sheet music score and be ready for some rather quick pedalling changes. The realisation plays at 94 quarter note beats to the minute. There is opportunity for the music to ebb and flow in respect to the tempo and the tempo rubato is a reference to this type of playing. There is some wonderful harmonic writing in this ternary form ABA work but avoid any exaggerated playing and aim to communicate the simplicity and beauty of the melody.

Added: 2019-12-13 09:45:08

Down By The Riverside arr. alto saxophone & piano

Down By The Riverside is a song that dates back to before the American Civil War but was not published until 1918. It can be described as an African American spiritual. There are many recorded versions dating as far back as the 1920’s and It was also familiar as an anti-war protest song during the Vietnam war. There are many versions of the lyrics which include Old Testament bible references. There are fine performances to be discovered by traditional jazz bands and singers that explore traditional, gospel and contemporary popular music styles. This arrangement sounds in the key of Eb and features syncopation in a march style. It is as an excellent introduction for learning to play in the 20th century popular idiom. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There is one accompaniment available that plays back at a tempo of 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-13 09:35:28

Down By The Riverside arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Down By The Riverside is a song that dates back to before the American Civil War but was not published until 1918. It can be described as an African American spiritual. There are many recorded versions dating as far back as the 1920’s and It was also familiar as an anti-war protest song during the Vietnam war. There are many versions of the lyrics which include Old Testament bible references. There are fine performances to be discovered by traditional jazz bands and singers that explore traditional, gospel and contemporary popular music styles. This arrangement sounds in the key of F and features syncopation in a march style. It is as an excellent introduction for learning to play in the 20th century popular idiom. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There is one accompaniment available that plays back at a tempo of 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-13 09:06:15

Down By The Riverside arr. flute & piano

Down By The Riverside is a song that dates back to before the American Civil War but was not published until 1918. It can be described as an African American spiritual. There are many recorded versions dating as far back as the 1920’s and It was also familiar as an anti-war protest song during the Vietnam war. There are many versions of the lyrics which include Old Testament bible references. There are fine performances to be discovered by traditional jazz bands and singers that explore traditional, gospel and contemporary popular music styles. This arrangement sounds in the key of C and features syncopation in a march style. It is as an excellent introduction for learning to play in the 20th century popular idiom. A flute part is appended to the full score. There is one accompaniment available that plays back at a tempo of 84 half note or minim beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-13 08:28:38

Elite Syncopations arr. intermediate level piano

Elite Syncopations is one of Scott Joplin best ragtime compositions. If you are not sure how to approach the playing of Joplin’s music listen to the composers own whose remastered piano rolls which are an excellent source of clarifying how this style of music should be performed. A tempo of 78 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute is recommended in this arrangement for intermediate level piano which also has suggested fingering in place. The music sounds key in the original key of C.

Added: 2019-12-12 22:23:28

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. violoncello with piano accompaniment

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo of the realisation in the realisation plays at 63quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. Accompanists need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A trombone part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 17:39:03

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. arr. trombone & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime known particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The music has been transposed to sound in the key of F and the tempo in the realisation plays at 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. Accompanists need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A trombone part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 17:16:24

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The sounding key is Eb and the tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The uses of the sustaining pedal by the piano accompanist is recommended and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A trumpet in Bb appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 17:02:00

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. arr. tenor saxophone & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The approach to this arrangement has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the video score which is available to view on our YouTube channel the ornaments have been written out although symbols have been used in the sheet music score which is available from the website. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The accompanist does need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A tenor saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 16:38:42

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. violin & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The accompanist does need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A violin part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 16:27:18

First Movement from Sonata orig. in G arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The sounding key is Eb and the tempo of the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which is on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The accompanist does need to make use of the sustaining pedal and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A clarinet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 16:12:12

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. oboe & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which can be found on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The uses of the sustaining pedal by the piano accompanist is recommended and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! An oboe part is appended to the full score.There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 15:34:41

First Movement from Sonata in G arr. flute & piano

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became a Naples based composer from 1725 when the city was an important musical centre. His life sadly was cut short by illness but he did become a well-known composer in his lifetime particularly for his Stabat Mater and opera buffa. The music editor’s approach has simply been to present an arrangement for solo instrument with piano accompaniment. There is no baroque or for that matter classical preoccupation with the challenge for the performer being to present what is a charming and appealing piece of music in a performing context. The tempo in the realisation is 66 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute whilst the repeat is not played. In the sheet music score the ornaments are represented by symbols although the mordents do not sound and are optional. For those actually wanting to see how the ornaments are played have a look at the realisation score which can be found on our YouTube channel. Elements of baroque style can be identified in the rhythmic detail and the contrasting dynamics. The uses of the sustaining pedal by the piano accompanist is recommended and there is some score detail relating to its use in place. An arrangement for solo violin with piano accompaniment by Alessandro Longo based on the trio sonata by Pergolesi is the source for this particular arrangement. Longo is best known for his work cataloguing Scarlatti’s sonatas and apart from being a fine concert pianist was Director of the Naples Conservatory. There are many other works have been incorrectly attributed to Pergolesi because as his name was well known, it was easy to sell the sheet music of others in this way! A flute part is appended to the full score. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempos of (1) 68 (2) 66 and (3) 64 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. Each accompaniment has a click track at the opening to give the tempo enabling players to play the upbeat in time.

Added: 2019-12-12 15:19:51

Odeon arr. solo piano

Odeon originates as a piano piece and dates from 1909. It is a lively rhythmic movement with syncopated shapes that needs to be played at a consistent tempo. This is the piano version in its original key with the realisation playing at a tempo of 92 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin.

Added: 2019-12-12 09:32:44

Odeon arr. flute, acoustic guitar and string bass

This arrangement of Odeon for flute, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The three individual instrument parts are also appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling or swaying in a dance context. The acoustic guitar and string bass as accompanying instruments needs to be played quite percussively communicate the energy of the movement. There are accompaniments featuring acoustic guitar and string bass available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-12 09:20:52

Odeon arr. marimba, acoustic guitar and string bass

This arrangement of Odeon for marimba, acoustic guitar and string/upright bass is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The three individual instrument parts are also appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling or swaying in a dance context. The acoustic guitar and string bass as accompanying instruments needs to be played quite percussively communicate the energy of the movement. There are accompaniments featuring acoustic guitar and string bass available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-12 09:07:23

Odeon arr. bass trombone & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for bass trombone and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A bass trombone part part appended to the full score The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girdling or swaying in a dance context. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 13:35:20

Odeon arr. violoncello & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for violoncello and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music is in its original key although where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The violoncello part is notated in the tenor and bass clef and there is a part appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girdling or swaying in a dance context. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 12:18:59

Odeon arr. trombone & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for trombone and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A trombone part appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 11:18:14

Odeon arr. bassoon & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for bassoon and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The bassoon part is notated in the tenor and bass clef and a bassoon part is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 10:51:45

Odeon arr. baritone saxophone & piano

Odeon originates as a piano piece and dates from 1909. It is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns and the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed down a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A baritone saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 09:12:04

Odeon arr. alto saxophone & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for alto saxophone and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 08:47:06

Odeon arr. clarinet in B flat & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for clarinet in Bb and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 88 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed down a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 08:40:18

Odeon arr. flute & piano

This arrangement of Odeon for flute and piano is a lively rhythmic movement full of energy featuring many syncopated patterns with the realisation playing back at a tempo of 92 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. It is also a movement with a wide melodic range. In this particular arrangement the music has been transposed up a semitone from its original key and where necessary there are some octave transpositions in the melody line to keep within the instrument’s range. A flute part is appended to the full score. The repetition element is quite strong as is typical of a piece of popular music whilst the form of the movement can be represented by the letters AABBACCA. Nazareth was a Brazilian composer and pianist whose compositional style absorbs many different influences including Brazilian, European, African and ragtime. As a composer Nazareth was particularly influenced by Chopin. The small ornamental notes can be added when the piece is able to be played competently. The score details in the composer’s hands is written in his native Portuguese and the words bright and dry are used along with the word gingando which means girgling. The accompanist needs to have quite a percussive approach in their playing to communicate the rhythmic detail and energy of the movement. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of 96, 92 and 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute with the repeats being played.

Added: 2019-12-11 08:19:16

Sweet Dreams arr. saxophone choir/ quintet

An arrangement for soprano, two alto, tenor and baritone saxophones – 5 parts in total of this improver level ternary form (ABA) work from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and tone quality in the melody playing. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The score and parts can be downloaded as a one document pdf file from the website.

Added: 2019-12-09 20:55:10

Sweet Dreams arr. clarinet choir/ quintet

An arrangement for four clarinets in Bb and bass clarinet – 5 parts in total of this improver level ternary form (ABA) work from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing and tone quality in the melody playing. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. The score and parts can be downloaded as a one document pdf file from the website.

Added: 2019-12-09 20:38:15

Sweet Dreams arr. violin & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for violin accompanied by acoustic guitar of this ternary form work (ABA) from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase requiring a singing legato tone when performed. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. Whilst described as an improver level piece the guitar player’s part is obviously harder than the flute players. There are three guitar accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 20:34:31

Sweet Dreams arr. oboe & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for oboeaccompanied by acoustic guitar of this ternary form work (ABA) from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase requiring a singing legato tone when performed. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. There are three guitar accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 19:04:34

Sweet Dreams arr. flute & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for flute accompanied by acoustic guitar of this ternary form work (ABA) from Tchaikovsky’s 1878 Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase requiring a singing legato tone when performed. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute. Whilst described as an improver level piece the guitar player’s part is obviously harder than the flute players. There are three guitar accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:52:38

Sweet Dreams arr. violoncello & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a plain score part is appended to the edited music score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:46:28

Sweet Dreams arr. violin & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. Violinists may wish to try performing with a mute. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a violin part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:39:14

Sweet Dreams arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a horn in F (French horn) part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:28:34

Sweet Dreams arr. trombone & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a trombone part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 18:04:58

Sweet Dreams arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a trumpet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 12:07:25

Sweet Dreams arr. bassoon & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a bassoon part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 11:20:08

Sweet Dreams arr. tenor saxophone & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute and the music sounds in Bb. A tenor saxophone appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 11:13:18

Sweet Dreams arr. soprano saxophone & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute and the music sounds in Bb. A soprano saxophone appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-09 11:07:20

Sweet Dreams arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such indicative score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The clarinet range is also explored in this particular arrangement. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a clarinet in Bb part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-08 08:31:07

Sweet Dreams arr. oboe & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such indicative score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory as repetition is a strong element. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst an oboe part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 80 (2) 84 and (3) 88 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-08 08:21:24

Sweet Dreams arr. flute & piano

This improver level ternary form (ABA) work is from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Young, Opus 39. It is a melodic movement with a regular phrase structure which is not surprising for a composer known for his ballet music. There are editions where accent markings are placed very generously in the music scores although the music editor suggests that modern instruments with their stronger tone quality do not require such indicative score markings. This is an excellent piece for developing legato playing, quality of tone and musical memory. The realisation plays back at a tempo of 84 quarter note or crotchet beats to the minute whilst a flute part is appended to the full score. The piano accompanist can make use of the sustaining pedal in the A section with the use of the pedal guided by the harmonic rhythm. Pedalling in other words is governed by the changing chords or harmony. There are three piano accompaniments available at tempi of (1) 88 (2) 84 and (3) 80 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 20:09:55

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. violoncello and piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for violoncello accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for instrument players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor has suggested pedalling for some parts of the movement but the guiding principle is that pedalling relates very much to changes in the bass note. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A violoncello part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 13:20:40

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. violin & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this original version for violin accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for instrument players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor has suggested pedalling for some parts of the movement but the guiding principle is that pedalling relates very much to changes in the bass note. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A violin part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 13:16:50

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. alto saxophone & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for alto saxophone accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the alto saxophone within its range. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. An alto saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:57:29

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. tenor horn & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for tenor horn accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A tenor horn part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:51:13

Romantic Piece No. 1 arr. horn in F (French horn) & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for horn in F (French horn) accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A horn in F (French horn) appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:43:32

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. trumpet in B Flat & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for trumpet in Bb accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the alto saxophone within its range. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A trumpet part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:37:23

Romantic Piece No. 1 arr. soprano saxophone & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for soprano saxophone accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the video score is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the soprano saxophone within its range. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A soprano saxophone part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:16:38

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. clarinet in B Flat & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for clarinet in B flat accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback of the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A clarinet in Bb part appropriately transposed is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) without repeats and (2) with repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 12:02:34

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. oboe & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for oboe accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback of the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for oboe players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling is in place for parts of the movement with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the clarinet within its range. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. An oboe part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 11:52:49

Romantic Piece No.1 arr. flute & piano

A simply beautiful piece of music of chamber music possibly deserving of a more inspiring title than simply Romantic Piece No. 1 Opus 75 but suited to being played by a number of solo instruments although its origins are as a violin and piano piece. It dates from early 1887. In this arrangement for flute accompanied by piano there is considerable dynamic detail and any performance needs to reference this aspect of the score detail. The tempo of the playback in the realisation is 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute. This is an excellent piece for flute players keen to improve their tone and legato playing as it has a very song like and melodic character. Great space is created in the accompaniment figuration which has an almost Bach quality whilst the harmonic language and at times the texture clearly belong to the late 19th century. The music editor suggested pedalling for the whole movement is in place with the pedalling effectively changing every time the bass note is changed. The repeats are not played in the realisation. There are some octave transpositions in the arrangement needed to keep the flute within its range. Antonín Dvorák is described as Czech composer with his work incorporating rhythms and musical features of folk music from Moravia and his native Bohemia. Like many of his contemporaries of the late romantic era who lived on what were considered to be, at the time, the peripheries of Europe, he is often described as a nationalist composer. Dvorák’s compositional style is influenced by Brahms although his works have a very individual style possessing a great sense of energy and anticipation of the new century. A flute part is appended to the full score. Two accompaniments are available (1) with repeats and (2) without repeats playing back at a tempo of 104 quarter note (crotchet) beats to the minute.

Added: 2019-12-07 11:15:51

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. solo piano

An arrangement by the composer for solo piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Pianists have a number of different techniques that they develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions.

Added: 2019-12-05 12:17:11

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. flute & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for flute and acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the trumpet melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 68/108/68 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 64/112/64 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 12:04:18

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. oboe & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for oboe and acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 68/108/68 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 64/112/64 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 11:10:21

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. violin & acoustic guitar

An arrangement for violin and acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 64/108/64 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 68/112/68 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 10:43:21

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. two acoustic guitars

An arrangement two acoustic guitar of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 66 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 108 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although this is not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the acoustic guitar 1 melody. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. Acoustic guitar 2 accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 68/112/68 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 64/108/64 Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 10:28:13

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. marimba & piano

An arrangement for pitched percussion (marimba) and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Accompanying pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this collected material was incorporated into arrangements and compositions. A marimba part is appended to the full sheet music score. Piano accompaniments are available with the following tempo options (1) 68/112/68 (2) 66/112/66 (3) 64/108/64. Numbers indicate the quarter note (crotchet) beats per minute for the ABA sections respectively.

Added: 2019-12-05 10:13:05

Norwegian Dance No.2 arr. violoncello & piano

An arrangement for violoncello and piano of this charming character piece. This movement is in ABA ternary form with the A section playing back at a tempo of 68 quarter note beats to the minute in the realisation and the faster B section at 112 quarter note beats to the minute. The music has a regular 4 bar phrase structure and there are some chromatic elements in the writing. There is opportunity for some subtle changes in tempo particularly at the ends of sections and these feature in the realisations. The melodic and rhythmic shapes of the movement are both strong and although concisely written there is plenty of contrast. It is an excellent performance piece with the opening melodic shape having an almost teasing quality. There is always a sense of movement in Grieg’s writing and the ranges of colour in his harmonic writing make his music eminently suitable to being played by many different combinations of instruments. Accompanying pianists have a number of different techniques that they can develop when playing this piece including legato, staccato, accents, tenuto, spread chords, crossing over of hands and using the sustaining and sostenuto pedal. It is a very good piece for developing octave playing. The sustaining pedal needs to be used in the playing of the movement and many of the piano chords are played in a spread or arpeggiated pattern. Grieg lived at a time when there was much development in piano technique and the quality of pianos improved greatly during his lifetime with the introduction of iron framed instruments. The humour in the music also invites an exaggerated performance although not featured in the realisation. Players should listen to performances to form their own view and explore different approaches to interpreting the music. Where appropriate some octave transpositions have been incorporated into the oboe melody line. As is the case with music from this period the sheet music copy has a considerable amount of score detail. Grieg’s Norwegian Dance No.2 was published in 1880 as a piano duet or more correctly music for piano four hands. Piano duets were a very popular in the late 19th century and much music would appear in this format. Grieg was fortunate in being able to access several folk music collections and much of this col